Interview Questions About Ties to the Community

  1. 0
    Hello! I'm a new grad still looking for work after graduating in May 2013. I've had a handful of interviews with numerous hospitals, all of which (except for one), have been out of state. Unfortunately I haven't received any offers, and I'm increasingly seeing that it could be in part because I don't have any connections in the majority of areas I'm applying to.

    Almost all of the interviewers have asked questions such as "Do you have family that lives in the area?" "How do I know you aren't going to leave?" The most recent interview I had asked A LOT of questions like that (and almost sounded irritated that I didn't know anybody there), and I find that they are difficult questions to answer. I just feel frustrated that all my nursing related answers seem to go well, but saying no to having family in the area seems to be more of a determining factor.

    I understand that they want to be sure you will stay a good amount of time, but at the same time, people move to places where they don't know anybody all the time, and they get to know new people and often stay. Is already having ties to the community really as big of a factor as it seems, or is it just me?

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  2. 0
    I don't think it's just you. The economy has changed since I was younger and moved across the country on a whim (several times). I don't advise lying in an interview (or ever) but it might behoove you to come up with some ties to the community. I remember when I moved to Seattle, I didn't know anyone, but I impressed the interviewer with the research I had done on the city, and by telling him that I had always wanted to live there. (Turns out I stayed 14 years.) When I moved to Boston, I told the interviewer that I wanted to work at the nation's best oncology unit, and that having worked in oncology in another city, I was impressed by what they were doing at the particular facility I was applying to. (All right -- bad grammar -- I'm at a loss to how I could have phrased that sentence!) If you're moving with a friend, mention that. You'll be more likely to stay if your friend stays.

    If you think that particular city is a great place to raise kids, or if you've researched and found that it has an underwater state park for scuba diving (which happens to be your passion), or that it's very close to a ski resort where you can practice snowboarding in hopes of becoming Olympic potential or that the Baptist church with the nation's best choir is there -- mention that. There must be SOME reason you're considering living in that city besides the fact that you hope to get a job there. Whatever it is, bring it up and make it sound as important as possible. Good luck!
  3. 0
    I got a lot of those while I was interviewing for the job I have now. I just told them that the unit I was interviewing for was my absolute dream job and that I knew I never wanted to do anything else, and that I would pick happiness in my job any day over being miserable at work but knowing people in the area. I got hired, so I guess that worked!
  4. 1
    I would be okay with the question "do you plan on staying here at least a couple years?" I am not okay with the question "do you have family or friends here?" Asking about personal life is a little sketchy in a professional job interview.

    It also shows that they have problems with retention if they have people leaving right and left. Why do people leave after a year or two? Is the pay bad? Do they fire people right and left? Is there a lot of lateral violence? Something is fishy here. If you are feeling brave you can ask "what is the retention rate at your facility? I know I plan on working here at least a few years unless there are some issues that I need to be aware of first." but only if you are feeling brave and are willing to take a risk :P

    I know for a fact that if I move across the country and find a comfortable job where I am getting paid a decent wage, and am learning a lot and am happy, I will stay for at least few years or even for life. But if I hate my job (lots of lateral violence, very low pay, etc), then I am going to leave in a year or two after I "do my time".
    Nola009 likes this.
  5. 0
    Quote from obesity33
    I would be okay with the question "do you plan on staying here at least a couple years?" I am not okay with the question "do you have family or friends here?" Asking about personal life is a little sketchy in a professional job interview.

    It also shows that they have problems with retention if they have people leaving right and left. Why do people leave after a year or two? Is the pay bad? Do they fire people right and left? Is there a lot of lateral violence? Something is fishy here. If you are feeling brave you can ask "what is the retention rate at your facility? I know I plan on working here at least a few years unless there are some issues that I need to be aware of first." but only if you are feeling brave and are willing to take a risk :P

    I know for a fact that if I move across the country and find a comfortable job where I am getting paid a decent wage, and am learning a lot and am happy, I will stay for at least few years or even for life. But if I hate my job (lots of lateral violence, very low pay, etc), then I am going to leave in a year or two after I "do my time".
    You might be planning to find a comfortable job and stay for awhile, but the usual attitude these days is to stay for a short time and then move on. Huge turnover is the norm now, even in wonderful jobs with great pay and benefits and great coworkers. People want to get into L & D or ER or ICU or they want to be NPs or go to anesthesia school. A huge turnover -- especially in an ICU where people are just getting their minimum amount of experience before anesthesia school will accept them -- is no longer a red flag.
  6. 0
    I think Ruby Vee's advice is spot on about thoroughly researching the area where your interviewing and then perhaps you could speak about that and how excited you would be to make a new life there, because that is what your looking for and maybe that they don't currently have the opportunities in healthcare your looking for in your current area. I would also agree not to flat out lie, but they don't know you and a little "enhancing" here and there is perfectly acceptable. I know first hand just how tough it is out here. I work prn at a LTC now and had only my 3rd hospital interview last week and I graduated at the same time as you. It's a rough market out there plain and simple and some of the interviews can be brutal. Good luck to you
  7. 0
    Apologies for my late response, but thank you so much to you all for your responses. I've really tried learning as much as I can about the areas, expressing my interest in staying, explaining my stable work history of only 2 previous jobs, but it still doesn't seem to be enough. When I get rejected after an interview, I always ask if they could give any feedback and/or why I wasn't selected, and the only answers I ever get are "it's just really competitive" or "you need to get experience." So, I'm left feeling frustrated and without a direction to improve - I have no idea where the problem is, if there is one at all. I'm at a loss for what to do...it keeps getting farther and farther away from graduation and I feel like nothing is ever going to work. I guess all I can do is to keep trying...maybe someday I'll come across the right people that will be willing to give me a chance!


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