Nurse Educators, Introduce Yourselves! - page 6

Welcome to the Nurse Educator Forum. It is my desire that you find this a warm, inviting place and will come here often for friendly, collegial discussions. Let me introduce myself: I have been an... Read More

  1. by   lisajy
    Quote from diannenurse
    I believe you will ge positioned quite well with your geriatrics specialty...as you know there is a huge demand for gereatric nurses. I would think a masters degree would be a great place to start with advanced practice NP you could be teaching, but would have to maintain your practice license. A CNS would be another option that may fit better if you are interested in community health.
    Salaries are greater in state vs private colleges.
    I found that it is most useful to seek job postings via the college online advertisements, look in your state job bank, and other various internet sources. Your local newspapers are usually the last to get the news.
    Good luck., Dianne
    While everyone talks about the importance of geriatric health care professionals, you may find that it limits you, especially as an NP. I cannot treat anyone under the age of 50 so it would be difficult to work in in a family practice. As far as education, it might be an asset to have geriatric experience. While we try to let everyone teach what they know best, there is always something left over or coveted by senior faculty. As to your question about the nurse educator shortage, I am not sure what to tell you. Our administration is currently looking at salaries but as someone else said they can't pay nursing faculty a lot more than those teaching other subjects. However, the low salaries are turning nurses away from education and to practice. We usually advertise locally as those who respond from away rarely are interested in relocating to WNY. Even those in our larger cities are not willing to drive 2 hours to teach and make less than they could as floor nurse. There are several journals that list positions as well as online resources. Good luck in your program.
  2. by   vickynurse
    Quote from gerinurse10
    Hello! Quick question: Do you think that nursing educator salaries will be on the rise due to the shortage? Is the shortage peeking now or will you see it get worse in the future? I am presently enrolled in a MSN education program (2007 graduate?) and hope to teach when I get out. I have looked at the help wanted ads and don't really see many open positions. Where are they and for what specialty? My specialty is community health and geriatrics, do you think I will eventually need a PhD to get a full time position? Thanks

    Here in the midwest, finding a job is very much dependant on "who you know" (even a little bit). If you come across faculty on your floor,cafeteria, etc I would suggest that you introduce yourself, express your interest, and be sure to inquire regarding who does the hiring in the nursing department at their place of employment. I would then follow up with a call or letter w/resume to that person and be sure to be a 'name dropper'. Most full time faculty in our area work as adjunct for 1-3 years before landing a full time slot. You may have to teach something other than your favorite subject for awhile as others have indicated.

    Good luck!
  3. by   kailuaa
    HI all, I am an asthma care manager. I take care of patients and administrate the program. I am frequently called upon because of my clinical expertise to 'teach' asthma. I have been asked to teach nurses, establish competencies, do SLM, and teach physicians and RNPs! My MSN is in nurse administration - so I am taking a nurse educator theory course, to hopefully make me competent! I look forward to learning from you
  4. by   JustaMaleRN
    Just starting my first gig as a nursing instructor in an ADN program. I will be one of the clinical instructors for a M-S 2 course. Hoping to find my niche, and hopefully a new home!
  5. by   Kokomo
    Dear Vicky,
    We have spokwn before via email. I start my first educational position at a community college soon. I will be doing clinicals and assisting in the skills lab. I am very excted for this opportunity. I presently have my BSN with 9 years clinical experience. Any words of advice?
    Thank you,
    Kokomo
  6. by   profjanmc
    I can offer a couple of words of advice, get to know the staff and the routine of the unit you wil be teaching in. It helps the students get an "in" if the staff knows and respects the instructor. Knowing the routine, paperwork etc....helps the students avois having to ask so many questions of the staff members. If you can, work a couple of shifts to get a feel of the place (even if it's volunteer time). Skills lab is a lot of prep and set-up, tear down. The students are looking for positive feedback and constructive suggestions, let them do it, as long as they aren't hurting anyone. And remember to have fun, attitude rubs off on the students! Be approachable and friendly. Hope it helps, good luck!
  7. by   nuprofessor
    I can relate to alot of what has already been said. I currently teach in an ADN program that has a BSN completion program also. I teach Fundamentals. Worked my way up the education ladder- LPN, ADN, BSN, and now MSN (1998). Seriously considering DSN if I can find a program that will allow me to continue working where I am AND go to school. My orientation to teaching started innocently. Years ago was asked to fill in for an instructor whose husband was sent overseas suddenly in early Spring (private sector job)- she had to go. The following Fall I was asked if I was interested in continuing teaching (My background until then was Cardiac and Critical Care). I was given the choice of teaching OB or PEDS (BOY talk about a hum dinger of a choice). I had NO experience in either (you have to understand that where I worked it was not areas that a Male was to work). I selected Peds and actually grew to love it. I did ALL of my graduate work in the pediatric and education areas (mainly diabetes and cystic fibrosis). Have taught for about 11 years now (mostly in ADN, but also some in BSN). Presently I am teaching at the school that I earned my ADN (plan to attain tenure- 2 1/2 years- and retire from there MUCH later).
    Well thats me in a nutshell !!!
  8. by   Kokomo
    Quote from profjanmc
    I can offer a couple of words of advice, get to know the staff and the routine of the unit you wil be teaching in. It helps the students get an "in" if the staff knows and respects the instructor. Knowing the routine, paperwork etc....helps the students avois having to ask so many questions of the staff members. If you can, work a couple of shifts to get a feel of the place (even if it's volunteer time). Skills lab is a lot of prep and set-up, tear down. The students are looking for positive feedback and constructive suggestions, let them do it, as long as they aren't hurting anyone. And remember to have fun, attitude rubs off on the students! Be approachable and friendly. Hope it helps, good luck!
    Thanks Jan,
    Am nervous however excited for ths change. I attend orientation for the students next week. I will take your advice and expect the best.
    Kokomo
  9. by   profjanmc
    Quote from Kokomo
    Thanks Jan,
    Am nervous however excited for ths change. I attend orientation for the students next week. I will take your advice and expect the best.
    Kokomo
    You are welcome....I adore watching the students cry at deliveries, pick up a baby for the first time and call me after many years and thank me, it's very rewarding to help shape the future nurses.

    ...Jan
  10. by   lalorac
    Hi, everyone.

    I just found this board. I've been teaching clinical pediatrics in a BSN program for 4 years. Recently, I have been appointed a full-time clinical position. I look forward to the sharing on this board!
  11. by   Kokomo
    Quote from lalorac
    Hi, everyone.

    I just found this board. I've been teaching clinical pediatrics in a BSN program for 4 years. Recently, I have been appointed a full-time clinical position. I look forward to the sharing on this board!
    Hi Lalorac,
    Welcome to the nursing forum. I also found it by mistake and am so glad that I did. I have received alot of feedback and support regarding my shift in nursing careers. Can you tell me alittle about yourself and how you became an instructor if you don't mind?
    Wishing you well,
    Kokomo
  12. by   Kokomo
    Quote from profjanmc
    You are welcome....I adore watching the students cry at deliveries, pick up a baby for the first time and call me after many years and thank me, it's very rewarding to help shape the future nurses.

    ...Jan
    Hi Jan,
    I recently spoke with an old friend who is a methodist minister (retired now). He received his phD in philosphy later in life. I spoke with him today long distance and he was so proud that I had chosen to become an instructor. He knew me before I went back to school to pursue my career in nursing. I have 5 children so this was quite a feat at the time (also a non supportive, now ex-husband).
    Anyway....the support makes me feel more confident in my new life role.
    Thanks,
    Kokomo
  13. by   lalorac
    Quote from Kokomo
    Hi Lalorac,
    Welcome to the nursing forum. I also found it by mistake and am so glad that I did. I have received alot of feedback and support regarding my shift in nursing careers. Can you tell me alittle about yourself and how you became an instructor if you don't mind?
    Wishing you well,
    Kokomo
    Teaching was always an interest of mine. However, when it came to making career choices, nursing seemed to be more flexible. (Which I have not regreted). I've worked in Pediatrics (floor nursing, pedi rehab, nurse manager, Emergency Room, Clinic and Urgent Care settings) since I got out of my BSN program, many, many years ago.

    Several years ago, a co-worker and I convinced each other to go back and get our masters. Soon after graduation, my co-worker received a desparate call from a faculty member at the university, needing to find a clinical instructor for pediatrics. The faculty member was my co-worker's advisor and did not know of any other graduating students who specialized in pediatrics. (We were the only 2 in our class). My co-worker hates the stress of teaching and refused the offer, but told her that she knew someone who could do it. She put the faculty member on hold and ran down the hall to get me. She warned me that she would not speak to me again if I did not take this job offer!

    So, I couldn't have one of my dearest friends not speaking to me, could I? Seriously, it was a position I only dreamed about and it hadn't occured to me to actually seek out opportunities. So, I took the job.

    My first semester was terrible. The students were disrespectful, and, not completely their fault, not prepared to handle pediatrics. I almost left and gave up on teaching. However, the course coordinator (who started with the university when I did) convinced me to stay. We had some input to the curriculuum and made some significant changes in coordination with the other faculty. Now, the students are more prepared and teaching is a joy.

    Carol

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