msn-education

  1. I'm currrently in a BSN program. My school also offers a MSN program that you can begin after graduating with the BSN. How long do you recommend working as a RN at some type of facility before switching to an educator at a university? My school hires most of their MSN grads as clinical faculty. Normally the MSN is 36 hrs., and can be completed in 2+ yrs.? Is that enough time to be prepared for a teaching role. Also, is 9 hrs. a semester to many hours to take for graduate courses if you plan on working full time, most of the classes are online?Thanks.
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  2. 5 Comments

  3. by   suzanne4
    I would definitely recommend getting a couple of years in before even starting the program. Otherwise, how can you teach? Your BSN only begins to prepare you,the real learning is done after you get your RN, when your learning curve just begins. Also, right now you want to teach, but please give it a year or two to decide if that is right for you.....................
  4. by   ProfRN4
    Quote from mjbsn2006
    I'm currrently in a BSN program. My school also offers a MSN program that you can begin after graduating with the BSN. How long do you recommend working as a RN at some type of facility before switching to an educator at a university? My school hires most of their MSN grads as clinical faculty. Normally the MSN is 36 hrs., and can be completed in 2+ yrs.? Is that enough time to be prepared for a teaching role. Also, is 9 hrs. a semester to many hours to take for graduate courses if you plan on working full time, most of the classes are online?Thanks.
    Think about your experience as a student, and your professors. It's the same everywhere (I assume): the ones who haven't worked hands on in 20 years, and the ones who still work per-diem on the weekends. Who is the better professor? Don't you want to be able to share your clinical experiences to your students, rather than lecturing from a text? I've been a nurse for 10yrs, and it will be 12 by the time I get my MSN in Ed. And the thought scares me that I will not be able to 'know everything'. But at least I have 10yrs of various experience to draw from.

    It's not the 2yrs of grad school that prepares you, it's the experience on the floors that prepares you. 9 credits is a lot in grad school, (more than 9 undergrad), also, depending on your other commitments. I work per-diem, and take 6 credits, and that's plenty. I also have a 4yr old. Grad classes are no joke (I know undergrad isn't either). More papers and presentations, which are time consuming (but better than tests). If I were you I'd take it slow at first. Get yourself acclamated (sp?) to full time nursing. You need to go through orientation and get comfortable first. Take 1 or 2 core classes the first semester. that's just my 2 cents
  5. by   Audreyfay
    IMHO, if you are considering an MSN anyway, why not take one class at a time. That most certainly is enough, along with working full time. That is the way I built on my ADN, then my BSN, and now have my MSN. The hardest thing about NOT going back to school now is that it is easy to get out of the groove, and then never bother going back. Good luck with your pursuit!
  6. by   noonan_2
    Hi...I'm a BSN nurse who has the heart of a teacher, and wishes to do exactly that. I've been a cardiac/surgical nurse at a relatively small community hospital for four years and I'm anxious to start a MSN program that is focused in this direction. The main problem is that I have no idea where to start and the programs in my area are few. I'm attempting to study for my GRE's, but without a straightforward plan, I'm having a lack of motivation. Does anyone have any advice? I'm living on Cape Cod, and the community college just got it's BS program.
  7. by   skicheryl
    Quote from noonan_2
    Hi...I'm a BSN nurse who has the heart of a teacher, and wishes to do exactly that. I've been a cardiac/surgical nurse at a relatively small community hospital for four years and I'm anxious to start a MSN program that is focused in this direction. The main problem is that I have no idea where to start and the programs in my area are few. I'm attempting to study for my GRE's, but without a straightforward plan, I'm having a lack of motivation. Does anyone have any advice? I'm living on Cape Cod, and the community college just got it's BS program.
    You may want to consider University of Phoenix Online MSN program. I am starting my 7th class in the program tomorrow. Other than working in learning teams, I really enjoy the courses although they are very intense. Each class (except a couple of them) is 6 weeks long and 3 semester hours credit, you will work hard during those 6 weeks. Learning teams are fine until you get on a team with a slacker, then you do your part and the slackers part, or your grade will suffer. In about half the classes I've taken there has been a slacker on my learning team but if the team has 4 or 5 students and everyone does their share it works really great. Some classes I have spent 30 - 40 hours a week on homework. Others have been 15-20. I really like the fact that I can take up to 4 weeks off between classes. It helps me stay sane! Good luck.

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