What kind of license do I get by becoming a LPN through the Army?

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    My goal is to get my BSN in pediatric oncology, but I also want to join the military. Right now I am a high school senior taking nursing prerequisites at the nearby community college. The Army has a program the trains you to be an LPN. I was wondering if it would be a good idea for me to do that program on reserves, that way I get the Army experience and then can do a LPN-BSN program when I'm done. My question is: with the Army LPN trainging, do I get an LPN license in whatever state I take the test in? Or is the license good for any state/country?
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  4. 4 Comments so far...

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    I had mine before I went into Army. I initially went at a lower job then switched jobs. When I was in you had to start at basic levrl then decide lvn or paramedic style. I was active not reserves. The lvn school is tough both as a civilian and militarily. I then used my funding to get my RN when I got out.
    OliviaJames likes this.
  6. 0
    I think you may be referring to the 68C -- Practical Nurse Specialist. As I recall (told by a friend), there is a little over a year of training & receive an LPN but, according to my source - it requires a 6 year enlistment.
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    When I was in it was a 91c pratical nurse. 91a was combat medic. I had both. You reallym learn to push your own limits and work as a team. Friends and memory for life.
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    It's now 68w with the "m" option. It's technically combat medic. Done in fort Sam Houston, tx. It's an extremely long AIT. It does not automatically give you a license. The army has trained you, so they don't care if you have a license. However, passing the course does allow your name to be sent to the board of nursing where you can sit for the nclex. You can choose your home state or anywhere you want to take the exam and get licensed.

    You can join the reserves as well with this MOS. That is really the way to go, IMO. You get LPN, then tuition assistance to pay to bridge to RN,get your BsN etc. Amazing opportunity.


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