What to do after BSN in Sweden?

  1. 0
    Hi!

    I'm studying to be an RN w/ BSN here in Sweden and since my wife is from Texas we're planning to move back there when I'm through. However, I'd like to take the opportunity to get some further education here before we move as it's all free. Question is - what would be of use to me once we move?

    The classes my university offer are (they are all one year, although all classes but the MSN require one year of work experience):

    MSN
    OR nursing
    ICU nursing
    Psych
    Paramedic
    Nurse anesthetist

    Although I am very interested in working in the OR, our anesthetist program cannot (AFAIK) be used to become a CRNA in the states. Also, I have no idea whether OR nurses in the States require certifications etc.

    Would the MSN be of any significant value working as a nurse?

    Basically, I'm pretty lost as to what I should do. Granted, I still have quite some time to make up my mind, but I know how time will fly and taking the big leap to move to the US require a lot of planning.

    Any advice would be greatly appreciated!

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  2. 4 Comments...

  3. 0
    Noone care to share their views?
  4. 0
    I think that knowledge is never wasted. However, I believe the people who hire nurses will be looking at two main things: do you have a license and how much/what type experience do you have? Most nurses with MSN degrees do not work full time on a nursing unit (there are always exceptions, but most of these are teachers or administrators). Paramedic would be of no help as far as nursing is concerned. You cannot work as a nurse anesthesist unless you have specific training and experience here in the states. I imagine your course work is free, so I would concentrate on anything that would augment the type of nursing you plan to practice. However, the nurse recruiters here will not consider those courses. Hope this helps. BTW, I will be in Taby in a few weeks to see my little vikings.
  5. 0
    It all depends on what type of nursing that you care to do. If you are interested in the OR, any hospital that you will work at will put you through their full orientation over here in the states. It doesn't matter what type of training that you had previously.
    You would be starting off here probably as a new grad, so the sooner you got started over here, the faster things would move for you.
    I would recommend taking your English exams as soon as you can close to finishing your degree. You must finish your classwork and have a completed set of transcripts to apply to a Board of Nursing to sit for the NCLEX exam.
    Since you are married to an American you are not required to complete the Visa Screen program according to the current laws. However, those are subject to change, and I personally think that they will, to require that all nurses have the appropriate English skills. This is the only way to guarantee it.

    Good luck.....................
  6. 0
    Quote from purplemania
    Paramedic would be of no help as far as nursing is concerned. You cannot work as a nurse anesthesist unless you have specific training and experience here in the states. I imagine your course work is free, so I would concentrate on anything that would augment the type of nursing you plan to practice. However, the nurse recruiters here will not consider those courses. Hope this helps. BTW, I will be in Taby in a few weeks to see my little vikings.
    Thank you for your reply! I realize that our anesthetist education cannot be translated into a CRNA. Regarding paramedic, all ambulances in Sweden are required to have an RN on board, hence the academic paramedic courses here.

    I just recently found out that TX (where we'll be moving to) now seem to require that foreign educated nurses have two years work experience before taking the NCLEX so I guess I'll just skip all the free academic schooling and go for real experiece for the two years following the BSN.

    Thanks and hope you enjoy Taby!

    EDIT: Duh, maybe I should get my titles correct before I post. I now know what a paramedic does. What I meant to say regarding the course (1 year) is that it trains RNs for working in an ambulance. So an ambulance RN would have 3 years +1 year ambulance edu. Sorry. I get confused - paramedic - EMT etc.
    Last edit by Swedandy on May 31, '04


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