Need advice about getting job

  1. 0
    I am a 36 y/o nursing student. I have completed my first year along with 4 clinical rotations. I have been seeking a job as either a CNA, or student/nurse intern in a hospital. I am not picky, I just want to get the experience. I have had absoultely no luck.

    I admit is has been a while since I have had to look for work. I've only had 3 jobs since I graduated high school. My last job lasted over 10 years and I quit that to attend school full time this past August. I have great professional and personal references.Have things changed in how I should go about getting a job?? Anyways, I fill out the applications, give a cover letter, and a copy of my resume. I always make sure I wear nice dress pants and a blouse. I fill out the application then get told "we'll call you, don't call us", which is followed by a postcard in the mail saying that they will keep my application on file. Then I wait, and wait, and wait...I haven't gotten any response.

    I am beginning to wonder if I should stop giving a cover letter and a copy of my resume since it reflects a business background. Several students in my class have gone to file applications in jeans and didn't even give resumes and have gotten jobs. :uhoh21:

    Help, I need advice.. Thanks, Berta
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  4. 0
    As someone on the "other side" of the application process (hiring people), here are a few thoughts off the top of my head.

    1. Are you following up your application with a phone call? It helps to actually talk to someone instead of just dropping off and/or mailing the paperwork. They can tell you about the usual process of application, what to expect, etc. I would call and talk to your contact person at least once per week until you get some sort of official response regarding your application.

    2. Do you know anyone at the institution where you are applying who could help bring your application to the attention of the people filling the open positions? ... and maybe give you a little insight into how to negotiate your way through the system?

    3. Are you putting anything on your application that might be a "red flag" for the institution that is discouraging them from calling you back for an interview? For example, is there something on the application that you are giving the "wrong answer" for ... such as willingness to have a criminal background check performed, willingness to submit to a drug test, etc.

    4. Does your application show that you are able to work the hours the employer needs you to work? ... and that you will work for the amount of money they want to pay you?

    5. How many people are applying for how many open positions? Is it simply a matter of applying for jobs for which only a small fraction of applicants are accepted?

    Good luck,
    llg
  5. 0
    Quote from llg
    As someone on the "other side" of the application process (hiring people), here are a few thoughts off the top of my head.

    1. Are you following up your application with a phone call? It helps to actually talk to someone instead of just dropping off and/or mailing the paperwork. They can tell you about the usual process of application, what to expect, etc. I would call and talk to your contact person at least once per week until you get some sort of official response regarding your application.

    2. Do you know anyone at the institution where you are applying who could help bring your application to the attention of the people filling the open positions? ... and maybe give you a little insight into how to negotiate your way through the system?

    3. Are you putting anything on your application that might be a "red flag" for the institution that is discouraging them from calling you back for an interview? For example, is there something on the application that you are giving the "wrong answer" for ... such as willingness to have a criminal background check performed, willingness to submit to a drug test, etc.

    4. Does your application show that you are able to work the hours the employer needs you to work? ... and that you will work for the amount of money they want to pay you?

    5. How many people are applying for how many open positions? Is it simply a matter of applying for jobs for which only a small fraction of applicants are accepted?

    Good luck,
    llg
    llg, thanks for the reply. You do bring up a few good points.

    I have called back a couple of the places I applied. Each call evoked a response similar to, "we get lots of applicants, didn't we tell you that we'd call you and your application will be on file for one year". I've even followed up with emails to the person mentioned in the ad. I was beginning to think that it may be inappropriate to call. Do you really beleive it's ok for me to keep calling once a week?

    Unfortunately, I don't have anyone who works at theses facilities for any "extra" pull. This is a new field for me.

    I am very careful not to miss or leave blank any part of the applications. I am not aware of any red flags I could be sending up. I've never done any crimes, drugs, etc. I even go ahead and sign the CORI form and the credit background check form.

    I am very flexible in the amount & shift I can work. I let them know I can work part time, per diem, evenings, days, rotations, weekends, and holidays. Basically, I am willing to work whatever they have available. Could this be the problem? Am I too willing? (Sadly, I really am. I want the experience.)

    What I am finding even more frustrating is I figure the position has been filled by someone more qualified,then I go check back on their website and the position is still there. UGH

    Should I stop leaving my resume with the application? It does show a background heavy in the business field and nothing in the medical field. I have worked fulltime since high school and have only had three jobs in the past 18 years. The only gap in employment is from Aug 2003-till now. I quit work to go to school full time.

    llg, thanks for your reply. I appreciate your feedback.
    Berta
  6. 0
    Have you tried speaking with the nurse manager of the floor where you had your clinicals? They may have positions open on those floors. I know that is how several people from my class got their positions. Good Luck!
  7. 0
    I think you really need to be talking to someone face-to-face about your situation -- someone who knows the job market in your area. I recommend setting up an appointment for an "informational interview" as opposed to a "job interview." The purpose of an informational interview is to learn about the job market as opposed to applying for a specific.

    The best person to talk to might be the Nurse Recruiter at the hospital you are interested in, but you might have trouble "getting in the door" and getting that scheduled. As another poster suggested, a nurse manager on a floor where you have taken clinical work is another good possibility ... as is someone in their nursing staff development department.

    You don't think you have the "connections" to get in to see these people, but you probably do. Your faculty members probably know some of these people and could help you get an appointment to see one of them. Talk with your faculty members -- particularly those who teach clinical courses and may have hospital connections. You might also find that your course coordinators, department heads, and/or school administrators have connections with the local hospitals. Meet with them, explain your difficulties, and ask for a little help and support. In addition to being able to give you some potentially helpful advice, they might be able to call up an acquaintance at a local hospital and get you connected.

    Once you obtain that informational interview, ask that person to tell you about the local job market, what kinds of jobs available, what types of requirements, etc. You might also ask them to review your resume and let you know if there are any "red flags" that you should re-work or remove. Think of it as a fact-finding mission, not a job-finding one.

    Ooo... gott'a go. I'll check in with this thread later to see if I can add anything to this post.

    llg
  8. 0
    LLG,
    Thanks for your words of advice. I called and spoke to one of the nurse managers on the floor I was interested in working on. It was the weirdest phone call I've ever made. Kind of went along the lines of "hi, you don't know me, but......" Anyway, she set me up for an interview and said she really wanted to meet with me. I had my interview today with human resourses, the nursing ed dept, and the nurse manager. She told me she wants me! Yipee Of course, they have to do all the background checks etc. I mentioned to her the hard time I had trying to find work. She said she wasn't surprise. hummmm
    thanks again, Berta
  9. 0
    Berta,

    I am soooo happy things went well for you! May they continue to go so well. Please let us/me know how things turn out.

    llg
  10. 0
    I know how you feel , hon.
    I'm not into nursing yet but recently graduated with my ma in counseling. I applied for several jobs both in and out of the field (mostly out) and only got ONE interview. The one iv i got I was very qualified and still did not get the job. Getting those letters in the mail can hurt Keep trying... you are bound to find something !




    Quote from Berta
    I am a 36 y/o nursing student. I have completed my first year along with 4 clinical rotations. I have been seeking a job as either a CNA, or student/nurse intern in a hospital. I am not picky, I just want to get the experience. I have had absoultely no luck.

    I admit is has been a while since I have had to look for work. I've only had 3 jobs since I graduated high school. My last job lasted over 10 years and I quit that to attend school full time this past August. I have great professional and personal references.Have things changed in how I should go about getting a job?? Anyways, I fill out the applications, give a cover letter, and a copy of my resume. I always make sure I wear nice dress pants and a blouse. I fill out the application then get told "we'll call you, don't call us", which is followed by a postcard in the mail saying that they will keep my application on file. Then I wait, and wait, and wait...I haven't gotten any response.

    I am beginning to wonder if I should stop giving a cover letter and a copy of my resume since it reflects a business background. Several students in my class have gone to file applications in jeans and didn't even give resumes and have gotten jobs. :uhoh21:

    Help, I need advice.. Thanks, Berta
  11. 0
    yeeeeeeee i just read your post ! Congrats !!!


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