How physically demanding is it?

  1. 0
    Hi everyone,

    I have decided I want to make a career change and go into nursing. Currently I am working in the mortgage industry and I am not happy there at all. I almost went into nursing about 10 years ago, but life got in the way. Now I am thinking very seriously of doing it. I had been planning on going to a local community college starting this summer semester, and taking the pre-requisite courses that I need and then going on from there.

    I've been reading this board a lot lately, and one thing I keep seeing over and over is you are on your feet a lot and they hurt. How bad is it? Do you develop feet, leg, and back problems even if you don't have any to begin with? I am asking this because a little over 3 years ago I was in a car accident where I broke my foot and ankle and tore several ligaments. I had to have 3 surgeries and although my foot is much better it'll never be 100%. Since I have a desk job right now, I can live with the daily aches and pains.

    Now I am curious if this profession would make my foot problem worse. I am starting to worry if I spend all the time and money into going to school, that 6 months after I got a job I would have to give it up. Are there some nursing specialties that are not as physically demanding as others?

    Is it unrealistic for me to want to go into nursing with an existing foot problem? Any advice would be very much appreciated. I have a real passion for helping people, but I don't know if it's realistic anymore.
  2. 8 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    From my own experience I can tell you bedside nursing is very physically demanding. I developed foot problems from the running around, but they fortunately resolved with orthotics. Your foot limitations shouldn't prevent you from going into nursing, if that is your dream. Talk to your podiatrist about their recommendations for what you are physically able to do. There are many different areas of nursing. Perhaps visit a few of these specialty areas listed on this site and ask what the physical demands of these jobs are. Good luck!!
  4. 0
    Quote from Kaliera
    Hi everyone,

    I have decided I want to make a career change and go into nursing. Currently I am working in the mortgage industry and I am not happy there at all. I almost went into nursing about 10 years ago, but life got in the way. Now I am thinking very seriously of doing it. I had been planning on going to a local community college starting this summer semester, and taking the pre-requisite courses that I need and then going on from there.

    I've been reading this board a lot lately, and one thing I keep seeing over and over is you are on your feet a lot and they hurt. How bad is it? Do you develop feet, leg, and back problems even if you don't have any to begin with? I am asking this because a little over 3 years ago I was in a car accident where I broke my foot and ankle and tore several ligaments. I had to have 3 surgeries and although my foot is much better it'll never be 100%. Since I have a desk job right now, I can live with the daily aches and pains.

    Now I am curious if this profession would make my foot problem worse. I am starting to worry if I spend all the time and money into going to school, that 6 months after I got a job I would have to give it up. Are there some nursing specialties that are not as physically demanding as others?

    Is it unrealistic for me to want to go into nursing with an existing foot problem? Any advice would be very much appreciated. I have a real passion for helping people, but I don't know if it's realistic anymore.
    Phone triage
    Lots of previous threads about this topic use the search feature and search things like career change, would you recommend nursing, and physically demanding. Yous should get plenty of hits from all of these.
  5. 0
    In most areas of nursing you will be on your feet all day, either walking, standing, or both, many times for 12 hr shifts. There are a very few areas which are not as bad, such as the NICU, doctors offices, outpatient clinics. But I would be lying if I said that hospital nursing will not take a toll on your body.
  6. 0
    I agree it takes a toll and I even work in the OR where the walking and lifting is less intense than on the floor, but we do push around large and heavy equipment and lift heavy instrument pans. My aches and pains are much more prevalent than when I was a mortgage banker sitting behind a desk all day. 800 mgs. of Ibuprofen x 3 every day, that's the only way I get through the days I work.
  7. 0
    For me, think walking around is much easier on the lower back and extremeties than standing still, or near still, for a long time.

    For that reason, the OR would probably not work for yours truly.
  8. 0
    I work in the ER, so sitting is very RARE! Lots of standing at the bedside which kills my feet ( now have nike air with 2 inserts which work better). After 2 days this week I was beat when I woke up for the 3rd shift in a row. Back is sore from lifting, pulling that goes on in the ER. Rules never pick up a non-breather out of a car while family watches...your back will pay u back in the morning.!
    Overall I love my job! The physical stress and mental stress is worth it! (I think)
  9. 0
    If it got really bad, you could work for a plastic surgeon and sit and take vital signs every half hour(I know 2 people who do this) or you could work as a pharm rep or you could work for insurance companies or you could work as a school nurse or you could teach... the possibilities go on and on. I think there are so many options that you're bound to find one that makes you happy even if you find yourself somewhat "disabled" If you go ahead and pursue nursing you'll have all those options available to you
  10. 0
    NICU nurses don't stand up for 12 hour shifts?? MAN! I wish someone had told me! I was doing it wrong...


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