Did a Magnet attract you?

  1. are magnet hospitals really"better" for nurses to work for? if so, why? thanks. ]
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  2. 15 Comments

  3. by   MIA-RN1
    I am bumping this because I'd like to know too. The hospital I will be starting at when I graduate is working on obtaining magnet status.
  4. by   NurseNili
    my facility is a magnet status hospital, one of only three on the west coast. i can tell you, having that prestige is pretty nice for a few reasons. it makes the salaries for nurses go up automatically, because magnet facilities want to attract only the top nurses, and top nurses get paid big $$$. our facility was not magnet when i first started here, but became magnet about 3 years after i got here, and since then, it has developed programs like full tuition reimbursement for bsn and msn programs, all kinds of nurse driven committees, a ton of educational offerings...in my ed, we get 16 hours of paid continuing education a year on top of paid education for all the required certifications that we have to maintain, and there 5 certs that our basic nurses must have in order to work here. not to mention yearly "magnet status" bonuses, and excellent raises, clinical ladders, etc...if you have a chance to work for a magnet facility, do it. it raises you another level that you may not otherwise have at another facility.
  5. by   Kim O'Therapy
    Quote from nursenili
    my facility is a magnet status hospital, one of only three on the west coast. i can tell you, having that prestige is pretty nice for a few reasons. it makes the salaries for nurses go up automatically, because magnet facilities want to attract only the top nurses, and top nurses get paid big $$$. our facility was not magnet when i first started here, but became magnet about 3 years after i got here, and since then, it has developed programs like full tuition reimbursement for bsn and msn programs, all kinds of nurse driven committees, a ton of educational offerings...in my ed, we get 16 hours of paid continuing education a year on top of paid education for all the required certifications that we have to maintain, and there 5 certs that our basic nurses must have in order to work here. not to mention yearly "magnet status" bonuses, and excellent raises, clinical ladders, etc...if you have a chance to work for a magnet facility, do it. it raises you another level that you may not otherwise have at another facility.
    thank you for the information. does magnet status = better nurse : pt ratios?
  6. by   Havin' A Party!
    Not sure any generalities apply.

    One of our large, prestigious local magnets, pays new RNs significantly less than smaller non-magnet facilities.

    Suggest we do head-to-head comparisons before deciding where to go.

    Think it'll come down to what features "attract" us more, as individuals.
  7. by   NurseNili
    well, in the ed, nursing ratios don't really apply, sometimes i only have two patients and sometimes i have six, depending on how busy it is. but the floors have strict ratios, and they are very particular about how many patients they have...they won't accept another patient if they are "over ratio". and, really, i thrive on having a bunch of patients to deal with and get bored very easily if i only have two. so, really, i think all hospitals in california have to abide, to the best of their ability, by the ratios, which is not a magnet thing, but a law. and as far as the new grad thing, when i graduated nursing school 13 years ago, there were no jobs for new grads, and the first job i got paid pittance compared to what new grads are making now. at least at my hospital, new grads are making bank! i hear no complaints from the new grads, which is great for them, makes them want to work more! i would hope that it would be like that at other facilities, but i am not sure...anyone know what the average hourly is for a new grad these days?
  8. by   ChristineN
    How do you find out if a hospital is a magnet hospital?
  9. by   Kim O'Therapy
    Quote from NoelChristine
    How do you find out if a hospital is a magnet hospital?

    The hospital usually displays that information on their web site.
  10. by   Kim O'Therapy
    Quote from nursenili
    well, in the ed, nursing ratios don't really apply, sometimes i only have two patients and sometimes i have six, depending on how busy it is. but the floors have strict ratios, and they are very particular about how many patients they have...they won't accept another patient if they are "over ratio". and, really, i thrive on having a bunch of patients to deal with and get bored very easily if i only have two. so, really, i think all hospitals in california have to abide, to the best of their ability, by the ratios, which is not a magnet thing, but a law. and as far as the new grad thing, when i graduated nursing school 13 years ago, there were no jobs for new grads, and the first job i got paid pittance compared to what new grads are making now. at least at my hospital, new grads are making bank! i hear no complaints from the new grads, which is great for them, makes them want to work more! i would hope that it would be like that at other facilities, but i am not sure...anyone know what the average hourly is for a new grad these days?
    i am in the greater houston area and the few hospitals that display their pay ranges also happen to be magnet. the pay scale is $43000 - $68000.
  11. by   nativenurse
    ?So, does a Magnet attract? The P.R. is that having "Magnet Status" means a lower turnover, higher retention of nurses and staff, and improved patient care and satisfaction. Does this happen?
  12. by   West_Coast_Ken
    Quote from NoelChristine
    How do you find out if a hospital is a magnet hospital?
    The list is located at: http://nursingworld.org/ancc/magnet/facilities.html

    There are now 8 facilities in California, two in Oregon and one in Washington for a total of 11 on the west coast.

    Regards,

    Ken
  13. by   Havin' A Party!
    Quote from nativenurse
    ?So, does a Magnet attract?...
    As mentioned previously, it can. Think it's situation-dependent.

    My thoughts are that, generally, the more "traditional" the nurse's situation, the more it might. By that term, I mean younger age, kids, relatively recent ADN or BSN, no specialization, no other professional / career experience, etc.

    OTOH, the folks with the more unique backgrounds will likely not be as attracted because of the structural nature of most "Magnets."
  14. by   a_clay
    Quote from NoelChristine
    How do you find out if a hospital is a magnet hospital?
    Here is the link to the ANCC website that has a list of all Magnet Facilities in the US. http://www.nursingworld.org/ancc/magnet/facilities.html

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