Considering Becoming an RN - pg.2 | allnurses

Considering Becoming an RN - page 3

Hello! First post here. I'm going to be giving you all a lot of information here. I have read tons of threads on this board to help me make a decision, but I figured I would try and get some... Read More

  1. Visit  HouTx profile page
    3
    hmm - hafta admit I'm wading in on the 'don't' side.

    One of my offspring is in a theater profession (technical, not acting, thank heavens) so I'm somewhat familiar with that environment. Keeping in mind that nurses who want full time jobs with benefits do not have the luxury of choosing their own schedules - there is just no way you could do it and continue with your commitment to acting. New grads - who are lucky enough to get a job - will be relegated to the 'off shifts' (evenings, nights) and everyone has to work their share of weekends.... no flexibility there. Just don't see how you would be able to participate in all the required "prep" - auditions, rehearsals, etc. & since performances are usually at night - nope, not do-able. Even if you were to focus on areas outside live theater... you would not have sufficient flexibility to do it.

    Another issue you may need to consider. You didn't mention your academic background; are you proficient in basic sciences & math? You will have to make stellar pre-requisite grades to qualify for nursing school admission.

    FYI, the "cushy" 4 days off per week do not really work out that way if you're working nights. As one OP has already pointed out - you spend a lot of that 'free time' simply resting and recovering from those 12 hour shifts.

    You can "be proud" of any type of work. Nursing is not really a readily available source of ego-kibbles. We get very little acknowledgement for our efforts - Kudos are not part of the job.
    TopazLover, llg, and Designer NP like this.
  2. Visit  asmborden profile page
    0
    Have you thought about radiology tech?
  3. Visit  HouTx profile page
    0
    Me again. Just had another thought re: flexible jobs.

    Have you considered anything in the IT field? I know many IT consultants who can pretty much set their own hours. Many are able to work from home. The education is less grueling and easier to obtain than nursing. Just a thought.
  4. Visit  Designer NP profile page
    0
    I voted "No" simply because you said you love acting. That to me means you are a creative person and nursing would stiffle it. I know this because I'm a creative at heart too. I enjoy reading, writing, painting and interior design. When you are a nurse you are not able to use your creative abilities much..and you will begin to resent nursing for it.

    I've been a nurse for almost 12 years & have been burnt out for a long while now. I even took a job at Target for a short while early in my career and loved it!

    Like others have echoed the schedule is not all its's cracked up to be. There will be many times you cannot participate in auditions or shows because of your schedule. You WILL be tired and recupurating on your days off because of the way they work bedside nurses nowadays.

    My suggestion is to take a career test (many are online) and find a career that fits within your true "creative" self. Follow what you love and you won't regret it later on down the line.

    I wish you the best!
    Last edit by Designer NP on Mar 6, '13 : Reason: spelling
  5. Visit  llg profile page
    0
    Quote from HouTx
    hmm - hafta admit I'm wading in on the 'don't' side.
    Keeping in mind that nurses who want full time jobs with benefits do not have the luxury of choosing their own schedules - there is just no way you could do it and continue with your commitment to acting. New grads - who are lucky enough to get a job - will be relegated to the 'off shifts' (evenings, nights) and everyone has to work their share of weekends.... no flexibility there. Just don't see how you would be able to participate in all the required "prep" - auditions, rehearsals, etc. & since performances are usually at night - nope, not do-able. Even if you were to focus on areas outside live theater... you would not have sufficient flexibility to do it.

    FYI, the "cushy" 4 days off per week do not really work out that way if you're working nights. As one OP has already pointed out - you spend a lot of that 'free time' simply resting and recovering from those 12 hour shifts.

    You can "be proud" of any type of work. Nursing is not really a readily available source of ego-kibbles. We get very little acknowledgement for our efforts - Kudos are not part of the job.
    I agree 100% with HouTx on these issues. Thanks for typing it all out for me, HouTx.

    I'm not one of those people who believes you have to have a "calling" to nursing to be successful and satisfied as a nurse ... but it doesn't sound as if there is a good match between your desires and the realities of nursing.
  6. Visit  PacesFerryBSN profile page
    0
    Try physical or occupational therapy, nursing these days is the pits......
  7. Visit  JimboWalls profile page
    0
    Thank you for all of the advice thus far! You have all been extremely helpful. Even the one who linked me to a video of nurses doing the Harlem Shake. I needed a laugh. Thank you for that. Please keep the advice coming! I would like to hear from as many of you as possible.

    Now for some replies:

    Quote from HouTx
    Another issue you may need to consider. You didn't mention your academic background; are you proficient in basic sciences & math? You will have to make stellar pre-requisite grades to qualify for nursing school admission.

    You can "be proud" of any type of work. Nursing is not really a readily available source of ego-kibbles. We get very little acknowledgement for our efforts - Kudos are not part of the job.
    I have a BA, so I don't have much past experience with math and sciences (other than in high school, where I was a 3.9 GPA student). In college I got a B- in Calc I, a C- in Chemistry, and a D+ in Intro Psych. I graduated college as a 3.0 GPA student. So as you can see, I did terrible in the 3 math/science classes I was in. However, at this point I was going for engineering because I didn't know what else to do (it's the family job). I ended up switching to a film degree. Because I wasn't looking forward to a career in engineering, I didn't put much effort into my studies and I believe that's why I did bad in those classes. However, if I find a career I would actually like, I am sure I could keep my eye on the prize and put the proper work and effort into achieving that goal. But when there's a lack of motivation, there's a lack of studying, and I believe that's what happened there. Regarding your other comment, I am not worried about receiving acknowledgement for my work. I've worked retail for five years if that tells you anything. Personal satisfaction is all I need.

    Quote from HouTx
    Me again. Just had another thought re: flexible jobs.

    Have you considered anything in the IT field? I know many IT consultants who can pretty much set their own hours. Many are able to work from home. The education is less grueling and easier to obtain than nursing. Just a thought.
    I really don't know much about IT, to be honest.

    Quote from NurseCutie
    My suggestion is to take a career test (many are online) and find a career that fits within your true "creative" self. Follow what you love and you won't regret it later on down the line.

    I wish you the best!
    I have taken plenty of career tests. I am an INFJ. "The INFJ is a special individual who needs more out of a career than a job. They need to feel as if everything they do in their lives is in sync with their strong value systems - with what they believe to be right. Accordingly, the INFJ should choose a career in which they're able to live their daily lives in accordance with their deeply-held principles, and which supports them in their life quest to be doing something meaningful. Since INFJs have such strong value systems, and persistent intuitive visions which lend them a sense of "knowing", they do best in positions in which they are leaders, rather than followers. Although they can happily follow individuals who are leading in a direction which the INFJ fully supports, they will very unhappy following in any other situation."

    Possible Careers:
    Clergy / Religious Work
    Teachers
    Medical Doctors / Dentists
    Alternative Health Care Practitioners, i.e. Chiropractor, Reflexologist
    Psychologists
    Psychiatrists
    Counselors and Social Workers
    Musicians and Artists
    Photographers
    Child Care / Early Childhood Development
  8. Visit  JillyRN profile page
    0
    Just a personal experience:

    I was one of the lucky ones who was drawn to nursing from a young age. As I got serious about looking into programs and the specifics of the career, I was even more excited to get started in nursing. I knew even if I absolutely hated some aspects of it, it was only 3 12s, I would always have a job, good pay, etc. All the things that people always echo about nursing. Unfortunately, that is not the case anymore. I graduated in May 2010 with my ADN. It took me 6 months to find my first RN job making $16/hour, working Mon-Sat, driving an hour each way, for a money hungry private physician's office. That will truly test your love for nursing. Since then, I've been lucky enough to obtain a different, much more enjoyable position. Still Mon-Fri in a clinic and the pay is slightly better. But I definitely don't feel like I have the options or flexibility that are "promised" when people talk about nursing. Until a hospital is willing to give me a shot on the floor, I will never see 3 12 hour shifts. I have no choice to negotiate salary when there are 100s of nurses in a 10 mile radius that will work for less just to have a position. These are all stressful situations that may take away time from the hobbies you love. I say go with what you feel, but I wish you good luck either way!
  9. Visit  dt70 profile page
    0
    Most people in IT feel under paid for what they do. Never ending training several times a year with expanded duties and no extra pay compensation . Working 7am - 3pm M-F is nice. with overtime 3am calls and occasional weekend shifts not so.
    want 95+ from financial district getting up at 4A and getting home for dinner at 9pm with no life because you gotta wake up in 7 hours.

    Maybe shadow Bruce Willis and make 15 mil a flick.

    20 years IT and want change
  10. Visit  bebbercorn profile page
    0
    Have you tried signing up as a volunteer at a local hospital? That might give you an inside look to see if it will work for you...
  11. Visit  sbostonRN profile page
    0
    3-day workweeks are definitely not a guarantee. I would love it if I could work for an employer that offered 12-hour shifts but none of them are hiring near me. So I'm stuck commuting 45 minutes 5 days a week for my regular 8-hour shifts.

    If you're able to shadow a nurse or talk to more nurses in your area, you might get a better idea of what it's like in your area. I work in an area that is saturated with nursing schools churning out fantastic BSN-prepared nurses, and many Magnet-designated hospitals that many nurses in this country would love to work for. So that means it's extremely difficult to get a job because of the competition. It's a job like any other - sometimes you take what you can get. I like nursing for the fact that it provides me the means to do what I want with my time off - traveling!
  12. Visit  lovinlife11 profile page
    0
    I agree with the suggestion of radiology tech. As an introvert you wouldn't have to deal with patients, you would make a respectable income and 3-12's may be a possibility. Respiratory therapy is another good option too.

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