Anyone over 50 recently hired? - page 2

by Biffbradford

1,518 Visits | 16 Comments

Let's say within the last 6 months. Anyone? Just curious. :confused:... Read More


  1. 0
    Honestly, I'm hoping that there are some jobs . My situation is a bit odd, I have an ASN, graduated 27 yrs ago, worked FT for 7 yrs in a variety of settings (college health service, med-surg floor, neuro briefly, OR, Medicare peer review office).

    I have not worked in nursing for 20 yrs, and just taken my NCLEX again and passed. So, the job hunt will soon be on for me (my self-employment work is at its height for the next couple of weeks yet).

    As you can imagine, trying to find people I used to work with and under has been challenging after 20+ yrs, so I'm concerned about being able to get references from nursing jobs. I've been self-employed for the last 10 yrs, so my work references would be from people who have worked with me, but not that I have been employed by. Any thoughts/suggestions for my situation?
  2. 0
    My original question was not specifically aimed at 'new grads' or I would have stated it that way.

    So, 3-5 50+ year olds hired withing the past ~6 mo, all with advanced (masters) degrees or higher?
  3. 0
    Diplomas and ASN/ADN are worthless because it's an EMPLOYERS MARKET right now. That means we don't have a shortage of people applying to positions so the standards have been raised greatly. Diploma and associates are not accepted because it would cause inequity in the compensation system (which is negotiable) between the incoming diploma / associates nurse and the current employees who are all BSN or higher. Basically if an incoming nurse who had a diploma or associates was hired, everyone else would demand a raise and it would cost hundreds of thousands to hire the new nurse.

    If you just want to work in a nursing home or small clinic I'm sure you can get by with an old diploma or nursing or associates. Though you are negating your real advantage over other nurses which is that you have multiple years of experience and they won't. Combine you years of exp with an advanced degree and you're the ideal candidate not some 30 year old with 5 years exp and their BSN.

    On the other hand if you're just looking for some low-level nursing gig and you're willing to relocate there are jobs all over the country regardless of your years of exp or education.
  4. 1
    Quote from trinnylax0484
    Diplomas and ASN/ADN are worthless because it's an EMPLOYERS MARKET right now. That means we don't have a shortage of people applying to positions so the standards have been raised greatly. Diploma and associates are not accepted because it would cause inequity in the compensation system (which is negotiable) between the incoming diploma / associates nurse and the current employees who are all BSN or higher. Basically if an incoming nurse who had a diploma or associates was hired, everyone else would demand a raise and it would cost hundreds of thousands to hire the new nurse.


    I disagree, I have associate RN degree and I was hired for an OR residency program at a level trauma hospital. Even if it took 9 month after graduation. Yes I competed with over 300 other applicants (which I am sure a lot of them have BSNs). There is only 4 of us in the program and 3 with ADN only 1 with BSN and all 4 are new grads with no experience. It takes time, great effort and real passion for field to get a job as new grad. It is wrong of you to completely disregard the ADN degree. By the way only few hospitals offer increase pay for BSN, majority of facilities, there is no difference in pay for BNS or ADN.
    MrChicagoRN likes this.
  5. 0
    Quote from Biffbradford

    So, 3-5 50+ year olds hired withing the past ~6 mo, all with advanced (masters) degrees or higher?
    I start a new job Monday. I am 56, bump the count up! I have an ADN.
  6. 0
    Quote from trinnylax0484
    diplomas and asn/adn are worthless because it's an employers market right now. that means we don't have a shortage of people applying to positions so the standards have been raised greatly. diploma and associates are not accepted because it would cause inequity in the compensation system (which is negotiable) between the incoming diploma / associates nurse and the current employees who are all bsn or higher. basically if an incoming nurse who had a diploma or associates was hired, everyone else would demand a raise and it would cost hundreds of thousands to hire the new nurse.

    .
    depends on the area. adn/diploma degrees are not worthless. as a matter of fact many of the adn/diploma nurses with years of experience are returning to practice.

    when the reality of what a nurses job entails,
    there has been a departure of degree nurses in our area. many are
    not happy with the direct care aspect. with all the cutbacks, direct care is more difficult with the current staff ratios..

    employers value nurses who show they are committed to patient care
    and do not hopscotch jobs. many adn/diploma nurses have years of
    experience and many years at one or two jobs over their career.
    my friend who is a diploma grad was just offered a part time job,
    she had been with the hospital 28 years before she retired.


    i can tell you many adn/diploma nurses are currently working and
    being hired for specialty areas that are not small clinics or nursing
    homes.

    please also respect the fact that many adn/diploma nurses have over the years have taught bsn students in the clinical area when in training.
    i respect the nurses of all education levels including lpns who
    took their time to help me in clinicals and practice. back then were
    unified as nurses, not polarized by degrees..

    just because nursing education requirements change, patients and doctors value experienced rns including adn/diploma nurses, and lpns in
    many areas.


    please have respect for all an nurses regardless of education or experience.
    Last edit by jahra on Sep 18, '11
  7. 0
    Although I am not looking for a new job, I was called last month with an offer - from the hospital where I worked about 6 years ago.

    I'm an APN with over 5 years APN experience, 19 years total nursing experience, an MSN and two post-MSN certificates plus all the other certs: BLS, ACLS, ENPC, PEPP, TNS, etc.


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