ADN to BSN or ADN to work - page 2

A part of me is considering on spending another two years in school and applying to 4-year colleges (maybe go back to Cal State Fullerton where I got my BA in psychology) to get a BSN (bachelor's in... Read More

  1. by   SarasotaRN2b
    I would think that if you are finishing with an ADN in Boston, there have to be options for you otherwise why have any ADN programs at all. I would think that most schools want to be able to provide nurses for their own local area. Maybe the hospitals just want to know that you will be continuing to work with towards a BSN.

    Either way, good luck!
    Kris
  2. by   BETSRN
    Quote from mccnrs2b
    I would think that if you are finishing with an ADN in Boston, there have to be options for you otherwise why have any ADN programs at all. I would think that most schools want to be able to provide nurses for their own local area. Maybe the hospitals just want to know that you will be continuing to work with towards a BSN.

    Either way, good luck!
    Kris
    Personally, I don't think the all BSN thing is ever going to fly. That is just my opinion as I am one of those people with a non-nursing Bachelor's that went through a diploma program (at that time).

    I certainly understand the desire to make nursing more "professional" but I am not sure that requiring a BSN is going to do that.

    Until the BSN programs can turn out more CLINICALLY competent nurses (as new grads) having all BSN grads is a pipe dream, I think. That's just my opinion.

    I would love to see BSN programs be 5 years (or at least some summers) to enhance the clinical portion and support their students as they learn. I would hope that would lead to less burnout on the part of the new grads.

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