Aussie-isms - page 7

by Grace Oz

Ok, I'll start a thread too! :cool: In an effort to help our non -Aussies understand our lingo, I'll start a thread on our slang words and / or words that are parculiar, common, here in Aust. So everybody, get onboard & add... Read More


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    "Mate" can mean frind, but can also mean buddy/pal ie generic term (I was watching "The Force: Behind the Line", that WA police reality show, the other day, and the arresting officer kept saying things like "Just sit down, mate" and "I'm going to search the car now, alright mate?" which sounds weird if you think it only applies to genuine affectionate relationships.
    I'm on nights and very tired, so more verbose than usual!
    How about "dry as a
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    Quote from talaxandra
    I'm on nights and very tired, so more verbose than usual!
    How about "dry as a
    "bone"? You ARE tired.

    I thought of another...

    "flat out like a lizard drinking' - lazy
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    "Cooee!" is a shout, traditionally used in the outback but can be done anywhere, in the city, in the bush, in the shopping mall. It is done to attract attention, find missing people or to let people know where you are.

    It is a loud and shrill cry - a call of "cooee" can carry over considerable distance.

    Most of us were brought up hearing our mothers shout "cooee" out the back door or anywhere really, which told us to she needed to see us.

    My favourite saying is "within cooee"
    which means not far from, within reach, close to achieving a goal.
    Last edit by joannep on Mar 6, '08
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    Ah... we could go all day, couldn't we? lol
    nyapa likes this.
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    Too true. When do we stop *evil grin*. Hey, we are giving away all our secrets! People may actually be able to understand our 'Strine if we are not careful!!!
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    Quote from nyapa
    "bone"? You ARE tired.
    Ah, the dangers of allnurses at work - MET calls mean abandoning the site mid-post!
    Take 2:
    "Dry as a dead dingo's donger" - extremely thirsty
    I always thought "flat out like a lizard drinking" meant really busy, at top speed. The joys of slang!
    "Useful as tits on a bull" - a waste of space
    "Bangs like a dunny [toilet] door in a storm" - enjoys sex, a lot
    "Full as a goog [egg]" - replete
    "Scarce as rocking horse [excrement]" - rare
    "Up at a sparrows fart" - arose very early
    "Beaten by the ugly stick while swinging from the ugly tree" - not very attractive
    "He wouldn't work in an iron lung" - lazy
    "Couldn't organise a **** up in a brewery/orgy in a brothel"" - useless
    I checked out a couple of online sites - I hadn't realised before that how many Aussie expressions are scatological and otherwise broadly physical!
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    OMG, things we say!
    Question though - I recognise all of these. How many do we use in real life; are we starting to lose them?
    I know language is a living thing, but it is sad to see that we are losing our own colourful individualism...
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    "Couldn't organise a **** up in a brewery/orgy in a brothel"" - useless

    a polite variation on that would be

    "Couldn't grow a choko vine round a country dunny" ie extremely incompetent, a choko vine (chayote or vegetable pear) grows extremely fast, and was usually grown on either wooden fences or over dunnies, and you ended up with far more of the flavourless buggers than you could ever cook in a lifetime. (choko's in white sauce anyone?)

    Another word to add to the list, though not a slang term, is "fortnight" (used in the UK & Commonwealth countries) and means 2 weeks.
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    And then there are all the shortenings - smoko, billy-o, arvo, brekkie, footie, sickie...
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    Quote from talaxandra
    And then there are all the shortenings - smoko, billy-o, arvo, brekkie, footie, sickie...

    Yeah, and don't forget .................. "quickie".


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