Professionalism in Nursing - page 3

by malinne

41,309 Views | 28 Comments

There's always a lot of talk (especially at administrative levels) about "professionalism" in nursing. A recent question here was "What can we do to promote professionalism?" I'm not going to influence responses by expressing... Read More


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    ....
    Last edit by traumaprincess on Apr 19, '06
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    Hmmm,Professionalism!!! lets see. maybe caring compassion, knowing your procedures, learning about different cultures so you can be sensitive to their needs, being open enough to make mistakes and correct them, Letting the boss know about your convictions (not legal, the ones in your heart). I think I would rather act professional and be comfortable than look professional and act unprofessional. What it boils down to is you can look like a real pro...but when you open your mouth....it doesn't matter if you are wearing an expensive suit or a furry muffin on your head(don't ask me where i came up with that), your words can either hurt or heal.


    by L. Ron Hubard
    A professional learns every aspect of the job. An amateur skips the learning process whenever possible.
    A professional carefully discovers what is needed and wanted. An amateur assumes what others need and want.
    A professional looks, speaks and dresses like a professional. An amateur is sloppy in appearance and speech.
    A professional keeps his or her work area clean and orderly. An amateur has a messy, confused or dirty work area.
    A professional is focused and clear-headed. An amateur is confused and distracted.
    A professional does not let mistakes slide by. An amateur ignores or hides mistakes.
    A professional jumps into difficult assignments. An amateur tries to get out of difficult work.
    A professional completes projects as soon as possible. An amateur is surrounded by unfinished work piled on top of unfinished work.
    A professional remains level-headed and optimistic. An amateur gets upset and assumes the worst.
    A professional handles money and accounts very carefully. An amateur is sloppy with money or accounts.
    A professional faces up to other people’s upsets and problems. An amateur avoids others’ problems.
    A professional uses higher emotional tones: Enthusiasm, cheerfulness, interest, contentment. An amateur uses lower emotional tones: anger, hostility, resentment, fear, victim.
    A professional persists until the objective is achieved. An amateur gives up at the first opportunity.
    A professional produces more than expected. An amateur produces just enough to get by.
    A professional produces a high-quality product or service. An amateur produces a medium-to-low quality product or service.
    A professional earns high pay. An amateur earns low pay and feels it’s unfair.
    A professional has a promising future. An amateur has an uncertain future.
    The first step to making yourself a professional is to decide you ARE a professional.
    Are you a professional?
    Last edit by workerbeezee on Sep 15, '07 : Reason: after thoughts
    beckster_01, orchid 10, fiveofpeep, and 2 others like this.
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    Quote from WVUturtle514
    I agree with the above poster. When I started as a new grad in the ICU I had a preceptor who only focused on the things I did wrong and was constantly correcting me and pointing out my mistakes. Because of this, I was constantly watching my back b/c I was scared to death I was going to make a mistake and be chastized for it and it severely restricted my ability to learn. I took it for about a month before going to my nurse manager about it. She promptly gave me a new preceptor who taught by encouragement and example.....needless to say, I did wonderfully with that preceptor and was on my own within two months!!! I think we should encourage, not discourage!!!
    I had an even worse story than yours. The preceptor tortured me for a whole semester. I have no idea why she is why so abnormal. There must be a fault with everything you did.
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    L. Ron Hubbard huh?
    Scary.
    brownbook and Simplepleasures like this.
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    Quote from Town & Country
    I don't think ANY administration TRULY wants "professional" nurses, because THAT implies that a nurse has a conscience and a set of standards --- all of which are dangerous to the current patient nurse ratios.
    Hee, hee, hee. Oh, Town & Country. How delightfully evil of you. Although, yes, as a new nurse, I have sometimes come slam against the wall of what admin TRULY values (need I say, it aien't patients, it's the bottom line, whether that's making sure patients don't complain, making sure that MD's are given special treatment, making sure the squeaky wheel on the nursing staff gets greased/placated, and, of course, the be-all and end-all, say it with me, avoid litigation).
    Professional nurses would also hold MD's up to standards of professionalism...and I can't speak for anyone else, but I sure haven't gotten that message in "real world nursing." More like, "Um, yeah, NURSES are expected to be professional and fight for patient safety but, um, you know...that's a DOCTOR...it's ALL RIGHT for HIM to act like that, or to cross the line...We're not actually going to say it to your face, but why don't you just look the other way like a good little goose-stepper? Good girl, have a cookie." That is to say, the MD's usually are "well-behaved", but when they don't follow the rules that nurses are required to follow, even if it puts/potentially puts a patient in danger, which a nurse would NOT be allowed to do, they can get away with it. (Not stepping on MD-qualified toes is more important than the doctrines of Professionalism, and Patient Safety...up until the point it leads to a lawsuit, of course, and then it's not like the administrators are going to admit that they enable these unprofessional and dangerous practices.)
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    Quote from workerbeezee
    Hmmm,Professionalism!!! lets see. maybe caring compassion, knowing your procedures, learning about different cultures so you can be sensitive to their needs, being open enough to make mistakes and correct them, Letting the boss know about your convictions (not legal, the ones in your heart). I think I would rather act professional and be comfortable than look professional and act unprofessional. What it boils down to is you can look like a real pro...but when you open your mouth....it doesn't matter if you are wearing an expensive suit or a furry muffin on your head(don't ask me where i came up with that), your words can either hurt or heal.


    by L. Ron Hubard
    A professional learns every aspect of the job. An amateur skips the learning process whenever possible.
    A professional carefully discovers what is needed and wanted. An amateur assumes what others need and want.
    A professional looks, speaks and dresses like a professional. An amateur is sloppy in appearance and speech.
    A professional keeps his or her work area clean and orderly. An amateur has a messy, confused or dirty work area.
    A professional is focused and clear-headed. An amateur is confused and distracted.
    A professional does not let mistakes slide by. An amateur ignores or hides mistakes.
    A professional jumps into difficult assignments. An amateur tries to get out of difficult work.
    A professional completes projects as soon as possible. An amateur is surrounded by unfinished work piled on top of unfinished work.
    A professional remains level-headed and optimistic. An amateur gets upset and assumes the worst.
    A professional handles money and accounts very carefully. An amateur is sloppy with money or accounts.
    A professional faces up to other peopleís upsets and problems. An amateur avoids othersí problems.
    A professional uses higher emotional tones: Enthusiasm, cheerfulness, interest, contentment. An amateur uses lower emotional tones: anger, hostility, resentment, fear, victim.
    A professional persists until the objective is achieved. An amateur gives up at the first opportunity.
    A professional produces more than expected. An amateur produces just enough to get by.
    A professional produces a high-quality product or service. An amateur produces a medium-to-low quality product or service.
    A professional earns high pay. An amateur earns low pay and feels itís unfair.
    A professional has a promising future. An amateur has an uncertain future.
    The first step to making yourself a professional is to decide you ARE a professional.
    Are you a professional?
    Thank you, workerbeeze, and L. Ron Hubbard. Although, yes, I will have to ask you where you came up with the furry-muffin-as-headgear image.
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    Quote from sanchy
    Hi. Im an RN student and my teachers are the most improfessional people in the whole world. They constantly sit down at the nurses station to gossip, they publiclly humiliate us in front of other health professionals and even the patients how can nurses get any credibility with people like that. Ive never seen say a doctor trainee being treated like that its unheard us but us were like cattle its okay! its so degrading. Our teachers are doctor wannabes on a power trip. ive met very few people who are actually proud of being nurses.
    That's terrible, sanchy - both that your teachers act like that, and that you've met "very few people [...] actually proud of being nurse." Maybe I'm lucky, but every nurse I meet (whether a good one or a bad one, for whatever that's worth) is proud of being a nurse...or at least knows that the lay public respects nurses.
    I hope that you're either able to rise above that toxic situation, or to get out of it. Take care.
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    I am a nursing student who is in the home stretch with just about 12 weeks left and I came online to find some ideas on questions I could ask a speaker for class. WOW! This place is great! I agree with everything every one of you had to say. Here I am as a student doing research for something as silly as asking a question in class all because my instructors are on power trips. I cry a lot of the time because I just want to be a great nurse and I feel like nothing I do in regards to school is right. I can NOT wait to be out of school but I'm scared to death of being on the real nursing end of things once I get out. My mother and brother are nurses so I do get lots of encouragement but my educators can have some empathy too ya know.
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    Quote from LilPeanut
    I'll disagree with the uniform thing too. I work at a children's hospital and it goes a long way to make the kids feel better. There are plenty of Drs. who have decorated their lab coats as well, to make patients feel more at ease.
    IMO, children hospitals are exempt.


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