Medical Marijuana for RN's - page 4

by Graciegirlienurse 19,253 Views | 43 Comments

Is it ok for a registered nurse to use medical marijuana (with a prescription) outside of work of course?... Read More


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    I'll post this link again, not for the sake of argument but to dispel rumor and myths.


    http://www.drugpolicy.org/marijuana/factsmyths/

    Personally, I miss smoking it. Last time I did was over 14 years ago...All it did to me was make me laugh and make me hungry.

    This is not to say that it wouldn't have some detrimental effects on others, just as any medication would. But I think the government desperately needs to check into this as a form of treatment for people with various medical problems.
    NightNurse876, Jessy_RN, LolaVenice, and 1 other like this.
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    And we all need to remember that the adverse effects of smoking marijauna is nothing compared to the effects of drinking alcohol. And there is a difference between recreational use and habitual use. I don't think smoking a joint ever now and then is going to make you lose your memory. Heaven knows I am losing mine and I don't do anything!
    Neveranurseagain likes this.
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    I would have to agree with the majority of the posters, it should be legalized and taxed like nothing has ever been taxed before. That would put a near end to the demand driving illegal operations and help our trillion dollar deficit. I would like to see other drugs treated in a similar way, not legalized for anyone to buy at the store, but regulated by the government, prescribed to addicts, and geared towards recovery. How could something like that work? I have no idea but I'm sure any drug cartel or organized crime leader would turn cringe at the idea of their product's demand falling right out from under them.
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    Quote from edisongirl25
    I agree that it's like alcohol, but I don't think it would help the debt b/c the reason it isn't legal is b/c the gov't makes too much off of it being illegal. Marijuana can be grown in a backyard or basement, the gov't can't tax it or make money off of "homegrown" stash. I don't smoke, never have either, but it's more money for uncle Sam to keep it illegal.
    However, if it was legalized; there could be rules and regulations as to who can or can not sell marijuana and where. The marijuana sold legally could have a "Marijuana tax" which the government could benefit from. Those who were growing and selling it that did not have the authority to do so (those that have passed exams on proper handling and growing techniques...what fertilizers can or can not be used, how pure the form needs to be, ect...similar to what your typical farmer would have to go through) would still be punished as they are now; except the government would then be benefiting two-fold...once on the tax for those that are legally selling it, and once again on the fines for those that are selling it illegally. Also, many dollars are spent on the war on drugs...and this includes marijuana at this time
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    Hi, I'm new and I'm an aspiring nursing student. I worked as an admin assistant in some very reputable hospitals out here in Los Angeles, and have worked with some terminally ill patients who used medical marijuana as part of their therapy. Here in Los Angeles, it's "very" legal.

    "Marinol is given often for folks with poor appetites, on chemo, immunocompromised, etc... It does not contain THC so therefore there is no euphoric feeling and you don't get "high." I write for it often for my patients with poor appetite to attempt to stimulate it..."

    This is inaccurate. Marinol is 100% SYNTHETIC THC and it DOES make people feel euphoric (as if anything is wrong with that).

    Any person using Marinol WILL test positive for THC.

    However, Marinol is a schedule III drug, and can be prescribed with refills, safely.

    Overall, the chemicals in marijuana and marinol are safe.

    Cognitive dissonance and politics keep the plant itself illegal.

    Even in states where it is legal, the law doesn't protect you from being fired from your job if you test positive for THC, even if it's not a medical or other type of job that is sensitive (air pilot, etc.). They tried to pass a law here recently in california to protect employees with valid recommendations, but it didn't pass.

    THC stays in your system for 30-90 days, so it's really sad that people who choose to partake on vacation could be penalized at work one or two months later.

    The more fat you have on your body, the longer it stays too.

    I would love it if the medical community would include cannabis in education.

    There is absolutely an appropriate place for it in western medicine.

    Honestly, I'd rather be treated by a nurse who smoked a doobie before she went to bed the night before, rather than taking AMBIEN, but that's just my humble opinion!!!

    Anyway, just wanted to share some of my experience working with medical cannabis patients (they like to call it "cannabis" in the medical community out here because of the stigma of "marijuana".)

    Hope to talk with you guys more! This site is interesting.
    rloh961 likes this.
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    "I would have to agree with the majority of the posters, it should be legalized and taxed like nothing has ever been taxed before. That would put a near end to the demand driving illegal operations and help our trillion dollar deficit. I would like to see other drugs treated in a similar way, not legalized for anyone to buy at the store, but regulated by the government, prescribed to addicts, and geared towards recovery. How could something like that work? I have no idea but I'm sure any drug cartel or organized crime leader would turn cringe at the idea of their product's demand falling right out from under them."

    They are doing this in California right now. They charge 8.5% tax on medical marijuana sold in herbal dispensaries. It is absolutely working and has taken cannabis out of drug dealer's hands (in MOST cases) and has put it into the hands of reputable business owners.

    It has been easier for the board of equalization to shut down operations not paying tax, than it is for the DEA to figure out who is legit, and who isn't.
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    "And we all need to remember that the adverse effects of smoking marijauna is nothing compared to the effects of drinking alcohol. And there is a difference between recreational use and habitual use. I don't think smoking a joint ever now and then is going to make you lose your memory. Heaven knows I am losing mine and I don't do anything"

    Google Dr. Tashkin's study from UCLA, 2006. 30-year study showed NO CONNECTION between heavy joint smoking and lung cancer.

    Don't look at me! It's Dr. Tashkin's study!

    I attended a medical conference (a CME credit approved by UCSF) back in April and he revealed the results of the study....

    More bronchitis and lung infections, but no connection to cancer or permanent damage, including no COPD.

    Alcohol is FAR worse for your liver than cannabis is for your lungs.

    Plus, there are other, safer delivery systems nowadays (tinctures, sprays, capsules, or cooking it in foods, or something called "vaporization" where it's inhaled, but not smoked).
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    I grew up, and am now raising teenagers in Oregon. Marijuana is all over the place. I also lived in Holland for ten years, where it is legal, and only found in certain places. Hardly anyone smoked it when I lived there, and I felt dumb for even brooching the subject because only people who had pain or were tourists smoked pot.
    I think we should legalize it (and prositution too for that matter) It's a plant for God's sake.
    NightNurse876, vixnnet, and LolaVenice like this.
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    I used to work for a boss who always said "you can do anything once". Guess it's up to you to decide if you are willing to risk your job and credentials in order to partake.
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    Quote from firestarterrn
    here are some links that provide the scientific research on marijuana and memory...

    [color=#ff4400]http://www.livescience.com/health/060313_pot_brain.html

    http://www.livescience.com/health/06...ot_memory.html

    "we found that the longer people used marijuana, the more deterioration they had in these cognitive abilities, especially in the ability to learn and remember new information," said study author lambros messinis, phd, of the department of neurology of the university hospital of patras in patras, greece. "in several areas, their abilities were significant enough to be considered impaired, with more impairment in the longer-term users than the shorter-term users."
    yes, but the study only involved 64 people that were selected from a larger study group. 64 total [this includes light, medium, and heavy smoker] subjects does not make this statistically significant. and the fact that these people were actually selected from a larger study group means you're throwing out a lot of data, which means that the scientific validity of this study is questionable, at best. really, people should realize that you can prove almost anything you want if you set the study up right....
    rloh961, NightNurse876, Zookeeper3, and 2 others like this.


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