Working Women - page 2

Interesting reading: Feminism and Nursing: An Historical Perspective on Power, Status, and Political Activism in the Nursing Profession By Joan I. Roberts and Thetis M. Group Praeger... Read More

  1. by   grouchy
    -jt, I've been meaning to reply for awhile to thank you for posting this info. My great-great Aunt (who I never met ) was a sewing-machine operator in NYC and an original member of the ILGWU, so I found this info especially fascinating, an insight into the lives of my ancestors. It was also shocking and depressing to see that a century later, despite all the changes that have occurred in that time, how workers/working women continue to face problems that are fundamentally unchanged.
  2. by   -jt
    As working women, we all owe her a debt of gratitude. And as nurses, we owe the same to these other nurses:

    City In Crisis - 1966
    http://allnurses.com/forums/showthre...isis#post89997
    Last edit by -jt on Apr 26, '02
  3. by   OC_An Khe
    Those that don't learn from history are doomed to repeat it.
    It starts with knowledge and involvement.
    Our profession will only be as rewarding as we make it. Its up to nurses to dedcide what is good for nursing, not the bean counters.
    Involvement and activism are necessary.
  4. by   nightingale
    Jenny P:

    You just never know about those classes. Guess I better look before I yap. I will look for a couple of these books.

    All:

    I have begun my small journey of activism and awareness by contacting my legislators and writing to editors about articles I find that are important. Baby steps in the struggle but important. I need to do it and nursing needs help. It saddens me greatly to see tha almighty dollar argument winning out over safe healthcare for our nation.

    It is thanks to the awareness of the posters on this BB I owe my direction. I agree we must stand united and move forward not backward. Ocankhe... I agree wholeheartedly:

    Those that don't learn from history are doomed to repeat it.
    It starts with knowledge and involvement.
    Our profession will only be as rewarding as we make it. Its up to nurses to dedcide what is good for nursing, not the bean counters.
    Involvement and activism are necessary.


    Bonnie
  5. by   -jt
    I think for Nurses Week, we should have a luncheon or dinner for the nurses at our facilities and during the event, turn down the lights & show a slide presentation with readings of these stories of women in the labor movement. It just might get some nurses thinking....... and moving.
  6. by   -jt
    "Well, children, where there is so much racket there must be something out of kilter. I think that 'twixt the negroes of the South and the women at the North, all talking about rights, the white men will be in a fix pretty soon. But what's all this here talking about?

    That man over there says that women need to be helped into carriages, and lifted over ditches, and to have the best place everywhere. Nobody ever helps me into carriages, or over mud-puddles, or gives me any best place! And ain't I a woman?

    Look at me! Look at my arm! I have ploughed and planted, and gathered into barns, and no man could head me! And ain't I a woman? I could work as much and eat as much as a man - when I could get it - and bear the lash as well! And ain't I a woman?

    I have borne thirteen children, and seen most all sold off to slavery, and when I cried out with a mother's grief, none but Jesus heard me! And ain't I a woman?

    Then they talk about this thing in the head; what's this they call it? [member of audience whispers, "intellect"] That's it, honey. What's that got to do with women's rights or negroes' rights? If my cup won't hold but a pint, and yours holds a quart, wouldn't you be mean not to let me have my little half measure full?

    Then that little man in black there, he says women can't have as much rights as men, 'cause Christ wasn't a woman! Where did your Christ come from? Where did your Christ come from?
    From God and A WOMAN! Man had nothing to do with Him.

    If the first woman God ever made was strong enough to turn the world upside down all alone, these women together ought to be able to turn it back , and get it right side up again!
    And now they is asking to do it, the men better let them.

    Obliged to you for hearing me, and now old Sojourner ain't got nothing more to say."

    -Sojourner Truth
    at the Women's Rights Convention
    Akron, Ohio
    1851

    http://www.womenwriters.net/domesticgoddess/
    Last edit by -jt on Apr 27, '02
  7. by   Jenny P
    I quoted Sojourner Truth at our last MNA convention, Julie; glad to know we're on the same page! I do SO appreciate your postings here, because this history of nursing and womens' rights and political activism is so important to all of us. Even the guys can be motivated by this information; knowing the driving forces behind some of our history may inspire some of them.

    The fact that nursing became complacent and rested on its' laurels in the middle of the 20th century, then let corporations and the almighty dollar take over health care at the end of the century is something that we are all to blame for. Nurses became so wound up in saving our own necks that we didn't (or couldn't) look farther than our own individual workplace at what was happening to nursing globally.

    Ocankhe and Bonnie, it is so true: if each and everyone of us does a little bit to advance our profession, we could be the major force behind radical health care reform! By sheer numbers alone we are bigger than the AMA and possibly even health insurance company execs. If every nurse would use their vote and talk with or write to their legislators; there would be no telling what changes we could effect. I really believe that votes can count more than $$$$$ politically.

    History rocks; and the lessons we learn from it can shape our future.

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