Looking for union organizing info (newbie here) - page 2

Howdy folks! I'm a newbie here and I look forward to learning from this BB often. I'm a surgical tele nurse 2 years out of school and I work at the largest Catholic hospital "chain" in Illinois. ... Read More

  1. by   Pinky18
    Edited - spam - TOS violation.
    Last edit by Nurse Ratched on May 12, '03
  2. by   pickledpepperRN
    Originally posted by billzie
    Thanks again folks for all of your input and support. I was able to find this response from the former co-workers of the RN that the hospital brought in to bad mouth the union:
    http://216.239.57.104/search?hl=en&q...ndy+wysock</a>

    On another note...
    We are having our first Organizing Committee open house this Thur and Fri (May 15, 16) from 8am to 8pm at 6060 N. Northwest Hwy Chicago, Il. If any of you folks scoping this thread are from the Chicago area and want to check us out, get/give info, or just shoot the breeze drop in, we're glad to have you! We will be have some folks from around the country to share their experiences organizing. I will be there for parts of both days, but mostly on Thur. If anyone has questions or would just like to talk to me one on one, just email me and we will exchange phone #s.
    Hope to see you there!
    Thanks again folks, Bill.
    After the meetings please tell us how it went. OK?
  3. by   kewlnurse
    there are a lot of bad unions out ther, I have worked for 2 of them. Carful what you wish for, you just might get it.
  4. by   pickledpepperRN
    Originally posted by kewlnurse
    there are a lot of bad unions out ther, I have worked for 2 of them. Carful what you wish for, you just might get it.
    I know a nurse who worked at a hospital with a contract with this union (SEIU). She was suspended for something she said she didn't do. When she called her union representative (paid by the union NOT an employee steward) he said, "If you're so unhappy why don't you leave."
    Doesn't that sound like management?
    She quit and works at another hospital.

    http://cna.igc.org/cna/seiuwatch/
  5. by   -jt
    she should have sued her union for misrepresentation
    Last edit by -jt on May 16, '03
  6. by   pickledpepperRN
    Originally posted by -jt
    she should have sued for misrepresentation
    I agree. Before that she should have gone to HIS supervisor.
    She said, "I thought you had a union so you didn't have to sue your employer."
    Too bad.
  7. by   pickledpepperRN
    Bill:
    What happened at the meeting?
  8. by   -jt
    < Before that she should have gone to HIS supervisor.
    She said, "I thought you had a union so you didn't have to sue your employer."
    Too bad.>

    well you lost me there. If her complaint was with the union rep not representing her appropriately, whats that got to do with her employer? If shes misrespresented by her union rep, she reports that to her UNION - not her employer - and she can sue her union. Her union is not her employer. So I dont get what she meant in her comment. Anyway, she still should have reported to her union officials how she was treated by her so-called rep.
  9. by   pickledpepperRN
    Originally posted by -jt
    < Before that she should have gone to HIS supervisor.
    She said, "I thought you had a union so you didn't have to sue your employer."
    Too bad.>

    well you lost me there. If her complaint was with the union rep not representing her appropriately, whats that got to do with her employer? If shes misrespresented by her union rep, she reports that to her UNION - not her employer - and she can sue her union. Her union is not her employer. So I dont get what she meant in her comment. Anyway, she still should have reported to her union officials how she was treated by her so-called rep.
    Sorry, I didn't explain accurately. This is a large union with a main office in Washington DC. Instead of quitting my job I would have reported the union employee to his supervisor at the UNION.
    I would hope that this particular union representative was not speaking for his employer.

    If the union did not then represent my as they should (after all that is part of what dues are for) then I would sue the union.
  10. by   billzie
    Howdy again folks and sorry for the delay, sometimes life gets in the way...
    I attended the open house for our organizing commitee on the first day in the early hours 0800-1200, so I did not see much action and was a little dissappointed in the turnout. I did see a handful of folks who I'd never seen before and this was encouraging as they were from other facilities in our system. All was not lost and my faith restored as I heard from my fellow organizers that the afternoon to evening hours were much more busy.
    We're still fighting the unbelievable fear factor amongst our co-workers, hmmm, still makes me wonder how the Catholic values of our hospital is breeding this. According to the national union officers who've worked with us, they think this is the worst they've seen the fear and opprssion of hospital workers. Oh, I wish the mentality here were more coastal, it seems you good folks are more proactive, political, and outspoken for your rights and have gotten out from under the boot of management to better yourselves. (cheers) Here's to hoping for hope!
    Thanks all, Bill.
  11. by   pickledpepperRN
    Bill:
    When the California Nurses Association wanted to organize as a union they had to get an expert from Chicago! Thant was in the 1940s. Perhaps the times have changed.
    I do see that the better the patient care the less union activity. Money is needed, but nurses won't work hard just for the money. Some of us are wildly protective of our patients though.
    Last edit by pickledpepperRN on May 27, '03
  12. by   billzie
    Yes, Chicago is ironically a union town in about every trade and profession, just not in healthcare, only a handful of hospitals and those are usually gov or univ.
    I would have to agree that money is not the key issue here. Patient issues are high on the list. But, quality of profession is the key issue for us (in many areas, pay included). We believe that with the improvements of the work environment and the environment of care with improve likewise.
    Pay is a dirty word, but, if it contributes to retention then it deserves to be an issue in the forefront of debate concerning patient care. Re: retention, I've also seen/heard at my hosp that it costs on average $25,000 to aquire/precept a R.N. Given the turnover rate if this $ was distributed as retenition bonuses I think the hospital is better served by it's investment in keeping its experienced staff.
    Sorry to ramble, but, whenever $ is an issue it always seems like we have to over-extend our defenses.
    Bill.
  13. by   pickledpepperRN
    I absolutely agree!
    Pay the experienced nurses so they stay!
    Why let them change jobs while hiring new nurses. All the sign on bonuses can go toward retaining senior nurses and improving care.
    How is it going at your hospital? They are fortunate to have you.

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