Importing nurses from the Phillipines - page 5

My hospital is working on getting nurses from the Phillipines to fill some of our needs. We have been in the paper process for almost a year and now it looks like we actually will be getting some of... Read More

  1. by   -jt
    Theres the Phillipine Nurses Association in America & other Asian-American organizations in almost every state.

    see: http://www.awib.org/content_frames/directory/asian/
    Last edit by -jt on Oct 6, '02
  2. by   NancyRN
    I can't understand why it's ok to bring in foreign nurses and ask them to work under conditons AMERICANS find appalling. The issue isn't whether or not we like Filipinas.

    If it's unsafe for me, its unsafe for them too. If I never get a break, they never get a break. If my back aches, their backs will ache.

    Is it also ok to get 5 year olds to weave your oriental rugs?
  3. by   tiger
    nancy, please think about you last question on your post. do you think it is really appropriate?
  4. by   NancyRN
    I find exploitation morally objectionable no matter what form it takes.
  5. by   -jt
    <I can't understand why it's ok to bring in foreign nurses and ask them to work under conditons AMERICANS find appalling. >

    Its not ok! Thats the whole objection. This "solution" is being used by the hospital associations to AVOID fixing those conditions. Thats why nurses groups are in DC fighting against it.

    Yet, how many of us protesting here have sent a note to our Congressmen & Senators telling them NOT to pass the bill that will change the immigration laws to allow an unlimited number of new overseas recruits & reducing their qualification & credential requirements?

    If the hospitals cant take this easy way out, they will be forced to face facts & fix the problems that are keeping their own RNs away from the job.
    Last edit by -jt on Oct 6, '02
  6. by   tiger
    Originally posted by NancyRN
    I can't understand why it's ok to bring in foreign nurses and ask them to work under conditons AMERICANS find appalling. The issue isn't whether or not we like Filipinas.

    If it's unsafe for me, its unsafe for them too. If I never get a break, they never get a break. If my back aches, their backs will ache.

    Is it also ok to get 5 year olds to weave your oriental rugs?
    these "foreign nurses" are adults, and educated ones. it is not like forced labor on a child.
  7. by   -jt
    <these "foreign nurses" are adults, and educated ones. it is not like forced labor on a child.>

    True but I think her point was more a symbolic one. The foreign recruits are exploited too in that they are obligated to make no waves as their visa depends on them keeping the job. They are forced to keep their mouths shut & just put up with the hospital does to them - or be fired, lose their visa & have to go home having "failed" in the US. Where we are refusing to work in certain conditions, these RNs feel they have no choice but to accept whatever is thrown at them once they get here & are obligated to the hospital sponsoring them. Its not true - there are laws that protect them - but a lot of them dont know that.
    Exploitation is exploitation.
  8. by   apols_uk
    gardengal i think there are few filipino caterers but they are based in california and new york called goldilocks i dont know if its available on your state. when i visited the states i went there.
    america food is ok its introducing them slowly. pop corn burgers
    milkshakes they are fine. these filipinos are adventurous anyway.

    like when i first came to england they dont even know that the philippines existed on the map so they served us full english breakfast and tea with milk which is quite odd to me but after a while i found it nice. they are easy to be with non of my english colleagues in here finds us difficult to handle like blending in. it comes out naturally.
  9. by   Gardengal
    I believe I use a different definition of exploitation than it seems others do. I do not believe that my hospital is planning to use the Phillipine nurses coming to our facility to derive unjust profit from the work of another. We are viewing this as a mutually beneficial relationship. The nurses want to come to the US, we want them to come and work with us. How is that exploitation?

    These nurses obviously know the level of committment they are making as they undergo an arduos process of paperwork, testing and approvals before they can even come. They will receive an orientation to their new positions and will have a group of persons welcoming them and trying to help them in their transition.
    Remember, the whole reason I opened this can of worms was because I was attempting to be additionally prepared to offer assistance to the newcomers and am seeking guidance from the international network of nurses who view this site. How is that exploitation?

    These new nurses coming from the Phillipines will be part of our staff! Just like any other new person they will be instructed in policy, procedure and chain of command: and how to complain. There really is no reason to fear retribution when questioning something or making a complaint.

    If I didn't think my place of employment was a good place to work I wouldn't be there. The job market is wide open and there are always other places to go. I choose to invest my energies into assisting in fixing broken systems which make work more difficult. Is it easy? No. But I truly believe that work is what we make of it, and it is only through our collective energies that we are able to effect change.

    I think it is exciting that we are welcoming a group of nurses from another country. I understand from our interview team that they are a nice group of people who are motivated and intelligent. I see no reason why they would feel exploited. I hope that they would want to stay after the contract is over and that they are able to do that with immigration services if they choose. After all-not only are we interested in recruitment, we want to retain staff too. Isn't the first part of that assisting them in their transition and making them feel welcome?
  10. by   -jt
    <We are viewing this as a mutually beneficial relationship. The nurses want to come to the US, we want them to come and work with us. How is that exploitation? >

    If the hospital is having a staffing problem & cannot recruit local area nurses because of what the nurses view as unacceptable working conditions, inadequate compensation, unsafe staffing ratios or management practices like forced overtime, etc, but instead of addressing those problems & making changes in the facility to improve upon those things & be more attractive as an acceptable place of employment to the local RNs, the administration is just shrugging its shoulders to it all & going off to recruit from the Phillipines & will then have THOSE nurses working in the same unacceptable conditions & for the same inadequate compensation that are driving the local nurses away, that is exploitation - whether those unsuspecting foreign nurses want to come there or not. And unfortunately, thats how foreign recrutiment is being used in most of the places where we work. The job market is not wide open for the foreign recruit. They have to stay & work for the hospital that sponsored their visas.

    Theres enough US nurses out here. If the employers would just fix what we need fixed, we'd come back to work. But they refuse to do that & choose rather to go get foreign nurses who will be obligated to put up with whatever the adminsitration wants to dole out if they dont want to be sent back. Thats exploitation.
    Please excuse our cynicism in these posts but this is what we see happening everyday where we work.

    Its great if thats not what is happening at your facility, but if its not, yours is certainly the minority.

    Check out www.advancefornurses.com
    NY edition this month. It had an editorial on how to make new recruits in general feel more welcome & a part of the staff.
    Last edit by -jt on Oct 6, '02
  11. by   NancyRN
    Gardengal, I'm not saying anything BAD about foreign nurses. In fact, if you liked them as much as you say you do, you'd be concerned for them.
  12. by   FTell001
    OH my G**!!! this group is discussing the etiquette? Can't they see what the hospitals are doing? Have you thought about what will happen to your jobs if they continue to bring in these nurses?
    And..if you keep your jobs..what keeps them from lowering the salaries you are currently getting? What if....they can hire them for a lot less money..give them a lot more patients to care for....and then you try getting management to listen to your complaints about pt. overload!
    OH..and .......this is an "out" for the hospitals. They can import those nurses..take your jobs..and do you really think MORE nurses will be put on a shift? Nah...no nurse shortage. Nurses are refusing to hire on to those hospitals for that back breaking labor, stress and disrespect. But....we won't have to worry about that soon...they will staff the hospitals with nurses that will just be grateful to be living in the USA..maybe they won't complain?
    YEp...THATS THE TICKET!
  13. by   Gardengal
    Originally posted by NancyRN
    Gardengal, I'm not saying anything BAD about foreign nurses. In fact, if you liked them as much as you say you do, you'd be concerned for them.
    I am concerned for them, which is the reason for my initial question.

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