RE: Thanks for connecting with me. and is there hope for me?

  1. 0
    I am a new nurse as of 2011 and had a really hard time passing my boards because immediately after school I was badly injured in a car accident. I finally passed my boards a year after graduation and ended up waiting and waiting for a job with no success. Finally after waiting forever I got a job Dec 2012 but got fired after only 4 weeks because my manager and preceptor said that I was to slow with charting and passing medication. I cried for over a week then starting trying to apply to other hospitals in the area. Would you put that job on your resume? What should I do?
    Thank you so much for your help
    LovesnursingRN
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  4. 4 Comments so far...

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    I would be forthcoming if I were you. SInce it was your very first job, it would not be hard to surface if a thorough background check was done. However, I would take a more proactive view of the situation. by expressing your desire to move past the new-grad category as quickly and as SAFELY as possible.

    That being said, your situation, based on MY assumption without all the details of your time spent passing medications, is one MAJOR pet-peeve of mine. If the manager and preceptor had an issue with your timeline, I venture to guess that there were other tasks and possibly more patients involved than a preceptor should have had that allowed for some things to get missed. Had you been in training during the days when disturbing the medication nurse was practically a firing offense, you would probably be well on your way to an insurmountable confidence level. But as luck would have it, you preceptor probably had more added onto her plate than she could possibly handle and you, Mr/Miss Newcomber, had to be the head that rolled. Unless there is a profound disregard for patient safety, co-workers, and the job itself, NO ONE should be fired within weeks of entering a brand new career field. They showed that they were no better than the ones demanding the one-year experience before the ink dries on your license! I mean, 4 weeks???? Sounds like my experience in my attempt in learning Spanish. I sat down at my desk on the first day of class. The instructor said, "fakejrhfbaeliufbaliufhEachKearjbflhjefmsgtiwwtywn tkuurjtrayki, si?" So I got up and left!!!
    Last edit by BSNINTHEWORKS on Mar 2, '13 : Reason: correcting auto-correct
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    Be honest with future employers. Don't badmouth the company that fired you, but tell the truth - you'd only been there four weeks, you were a new grad new hire, you don't feel you were given the time to prove yourself.

    Be eager, honest, and respectful. I can't imagine a company firing someone for simply being slow at charting during a training period (or at least, I hope you were still in training...please tell me you were still in training? Or that employer has more problems than slow charting, and you have even more evidence that it is more them than you.)
  7. 0
    Thank you so much for reading and answering my post everyone, because I really need your advice. I was on orientation when I got fired, but was only doing patient care on the floor for 3 weeks with a rude, evil acting preceptor in ,Detroit, Michigan. I have applied for many jobs since then ( 2 months ago) and I can not seem to get hired anywhere. I am scared that that job being on my resume is the reason why! Also there are only 3 hospital chains in Detroit and that was one of them. They own like 10 hospitals. The other two (in-which is very unfair) does not hire new grads under 1-year nursing experience). I have been on a few interviews but can not for the life off me figure out how to explain that job and its loss without sounding like a incompetent nurse and it leaves me jobless! I have friends in Michigan who says just do not mention them because no one in Michigan is going to hire you. HELP!!!!!
  8. 0
    Quote from delilas
    Be honest with future employers. Don't badmouth the company that fired you, but tell the truth - you'd only been there four weeks, you were a new grad new hire, you don't feel you were given the time to prove yourself.

    Be eager, honest, and respectful. I can't imagine a company firing someone for simply being slow at charting during a training period (or at least, I hope you were still in training...please tell me you were still in training? Or that employer has more problems than slow charting, and you have even more evidence that it is more them than you.)
    I've been trying to get other nurses opinions myself. I quit my first nursing job 2 months in, but I'm scared to put it on my resume and applications that I wouldn't even get an interview when they automatically see that on my resume. I don't know what to do. Advice anyone? I don't want a background check to look like I was being deceitful either though. I'm lost as to what to do


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