Would you still become a NP or would you go the MD route? Would you still become a NP or would you go the MD route? - pg.5 | allnurses

Would you still become a NP or would you go the MD route? - page 5

This is my first post, but I've been reading the boards for some time. My question for current NPs is: If you could go back in time, would you still become a NP or would you go the MD route... Read More

  1. Visit  Dodongo profile page
    #52 3
    Quote from RockMay
    They might require an "intro to organic chemistry" or "principals of organic chemistry" but those are not true orgo 1 and orgo 2 courses. Those of us who took actual orgo 1 and 2 look on those baby courses are complete fluff.
    Oh come on Rocky. How can you honestly say that you think organic chem is essential to the practice of medicine? I graduated with 24 credits of chem from my first degree - 6 classes with lab. I took those courses about a decade ago. I could not tell you the difference between SN1 or SN2 reactions. And if you were to show me a mass spec graph I wouldn't even know how to begin coming up with what compound it was. I remember lots of boats and chairs though - Super helpful. I also had this really cool molecular model set. So that was fun. But again, my point is that it's not something physicians ponder on regularly.

    And, I'd be surprised if half of PA programs required it. Out of the 4 just in my area 1 requires it. The rest require inorganic.

    You are extremely high and mighty which is just so exhausting for me. And you really are making PAs in general look bad (although I work with some really good ones). But I must say I do love checking to see just how ridiculous you are. So for that, keep it up.
  2. Visit  Goldenfox profile page
    #53 2
    Quote from ICUman
    Do you have any personal opinions or thoughts on CRNA vs MD? What would you personally choose if you could have a do-over



    I don't know a whole lot about the current world of CRNAs although I do know that their profession has its own challenges as well. But, they are in a different situation because CRNA school is much more of a challenge to get into and get through than NP school. And there aren't dozens of CRNAs competing against each other for a single low-paying job in many parts of the country as is now happening with FNPs. At one point I had heard that, in some quarters, the anesthesiologists where using turf politics to keep out the CRNAs but that was years ago and I don't know if it is still true now. I have a relative who is a CRNA and she is doing very well. She does mostly contract work and earns very good money and though she often works odd hours she loves it. Since you have the ICU background if you are interested in anesthesia then CRNA is definitely something you should investigate more.

    If I could do it all over I would go to medical school and go into either derm or plastic surgery as a specialty.
  3. Visit  Goldenfox profile page
    #54 2
    Quote from RockMay
    They might require an "intro to organic chemistry" or "principals of organic chemistry" but those are not true orgo 1 and orgo 2 courses. Those of us who took actual orgo 1 and 2 look on those baby courses are complete fluff.


    What exactly are you saying about organic chemistry..that its so hard that only bright medical students can do it but not us silly nurses?

    When I was a pre med student I took organic chemistry and advanced math and biology courses. To me, these classes were easy because I used to love science and math. I actually found organic chemistry to be easier than general chemistry because orgo is more about using formulas to create things---which is much more interesting to do than to just observe reactions. There is nothing at all hard about these classes. Even if you are not a sciencehead you can still master them if you study and learn the principles behind the rules.

    These upper level science and math classes are fascinating, but there is no reason at all for NP schools to require them---or medical schools for that matter. Being an expert at linear algebra and differential equations and knowing all the details of how to formulate carbon-based products is awesome but these things will not necessarily make anyone a better clinician whether you are an NP or a physician. As a doctor or NP all that you need to know is what the drug is and how it works---you don't need to know how to make it.

    Ask most practicing docs out there who've been at it for a while how much they remember about calculus and organic chemistry from their sophomore years of college and they would probably laugh at you.

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