Which Degree is preferred?

  1. 0
    I graduate from a community ADN program in December, yet cannot help looking to the future. I have 5 years experience in the ER as a tech prior to nursing school, and am very interested in becoming a NP to work "urgent care" or "fast track" as we called it in our ER.

    Are there any NP specialties better than others for this type of practice?

    What about pay ranges (i hate to ask these questions, sorry!) ?

    Any other tips, ideas, or anything is welcome.

    Thanks!
  2. 780 Visits
    Find Similar Topics
  3. 3 Comments so far...

  4. 1
    Quote from CRNAspire
    I graduate from a community ADN program in December, yet cannot help looking to the future. I have 5 years experience in the ER as a tech prior to nursing school, and am very interested in becoming a NP to work "urgent care" or "fast track" as we called it in our ER.

    Are there any NP specialties better than others for this type of practice?

    What about pay ranges (i hate to ask these questions, sorry!) ?

    Any other tips, ideas, or anything is welcome.

    Thanks!
    For ERs, especially fast tracks and urgent cares, often times FNP is preferred so you can treat both adults and pediatrics. The pay ranges significantly based on hospital/location.
    CRNAspire likes this.
  5. 0
    Quote from CRNAspire
    I graduate from a community ADN program in December, yet cannot help looking to the future. I have 5 years experience in the ER as a tech prior to nursing school, and am very interested in becoming a NP to work "urgent care" or "fast track" as we called it in our ER.

    Are there any NP specialties better than others for this type of practice?

    What about pay ranges (i hate to ask these questions, sorry!) ?

    Any other tips, ideas, or anything is welcome.

    Thanks!
    You blink and the future becomes the present....

    You mentioned becoming an ADN... Will be a great time now and with your first job(s) to start networking (ie go down to the ER and talk with the providers).

    FNP does give you the broadest range of treatment ages... Although in some ERs the NPs/PAs are restricted by age group... Overall it really will depend on your market area, state laws and hospital rules..... So I would highly suggest you talk with the professors at the local schools as well as someone at the local hospitals... They will usually be able to to give you the "low-down."
  6. 0
    My husband has worked as a NP in the ER for years. His speciality is FNP, which has served well up until lately. The FNP is GREAT if you are doing urgent care/fast track. However, if you want to get into more complex cases and procedures, having both the FNP and ACNP is your best bet.
    We used to have an ENP program in our area, but they are about to merge it back with the FNP program. The problem is that the ENP limits you to the urgent/emergent setting and there is not a certification exam for ENPs. They actually take the FNP certification exam.
    So, since you are looking to do urgent care, FNP would be your best bet. Just remember that you may fall in love with some of the higher complexity cases, and you will most likely need your ACNP in order to place lines, intubate, etc.


Top