What are the BEST and WORST States to practice as an NP? - page 2

I am speaking primarily from two perspectives here: 1. The degree to which NP's are accepted, recognized, and utilized in that area/state. 2. The degree to which state law recognizes NP's, and... Read More

  1. by   youngRNstudent
    Quote from Alnamvet
    California is the BEST for NP's since an MSN is not required to certify and license. There are still several NP certificate programs left in the US, California has 4 or 5 such programs; an example is the UCLA Harbor hospital woman's health care NP program.
    wow you must live real close to me! I'm like 10 minutes from harbor ucla.

    I'm not sure I really support NP certificate programs though. Sounds kind of like a "bootleg" NP license. One of my clinical instructors works there and promotes their women's health program, but it seems very sketchy to me. NO BSN needed, you don't get your MSN, no prerequisites needed, and very minimal work experience. Pretty much, you could get your certificate there, but I think you would be stuck working there. Are there a lot of places that would hire a certificate NP? I don't know...doesn't sound like a great thing
  2. by   NeuroICURN
    Quote from Dave ARNP
    Best is BY FAR Washington State. Second would probably be Penn.

    WORST? Lemme start a list.
    Georiga, Florida, Kentucky, Virginia, West Virginia.
    And there are others, but I would have to pull out my chart (which is at my office)

    Dave
    Dave,

    I'm just curious about your response. I am an RN working toward becoming a NP. I currently hold my license in the state of PA. However, I live in the WV, PA, OH tri-state area, so I could work in any of the three.

    I can't see myself ever NOT working in a big city like Pittsburgh, but I never say "never". So, why do you rate WV as one of the worst and PA as one of the best?

    Any advice or information you (or anyone else) could give me would be helpful. Thank you in advance for your time!

    NeuroICURN
  3. by   UCLARN
    After January 1st 2008, NP's in California MUST have a masters. To be certified nationally you must always have a master's degree... no matter what state you are in.

    http://info.sen.ca.gov/pub/bill/asm/..._sen_comm.html


    Quote from Alnamvet
    California is the BEST for NP's since an MSN is not required to certify and license. There are still several NP certificate programs left in the US, California has 4 or 5 such programs; an example is the UCLA Harbor hospital woman's health care NP program.
  4. by   chris_at_lucas_RN
    I wonder why California is waiting until 2008 to require NP's to have a master's degree? Anybody know?
  5. by   jwBSN
    Quote from FutureRNMichael
    Since Washington State is high on the list, where does their neighbors to the south in Oregon rank?
    This is my first post to the NP forum....I am in the NP program here in MO. now....I have always wanted to travel more....has anyone tried the traveling NP opportunities?
  6. by   researchfnp
    Quote from Alnamvet
    California is the BEST for NP's since an MSN is not required to certify and license. There are still several NP certificate programs left in the US, California has 4 or 5 such programs; an example is the UCLA Harbor hospital woman's health care NP program.
    The California BON REQUIRES that you provide documentation regarding your graduate studies-MSN- before you become certified in this state.

    Also, most employers request that NPs not only be state certified but also
    nationally/board certified. In order to sit for the board exam, you MUST
    have a MSN.
  7. by   zenman
    Quote from Dave ARNP
    I've never heard anything good about Hawaii.

    Nevada and Texas I'm pretty clueless on.

    -Dave
    I'm in Hawaii but do not have contact with NPs. I think most of them here might work for Kaiser. I'm from Texas and compared to that state, Hawaii is a third world country. Did I say that...slap my face! :chuckle
  8. by   LLDPaRN
    In addtion to needing a master's to sit for the national certification exam, some states require the certification to get your NP license. I know that is the case in NJ and recently was enacted in PA as well. I'm really surprised that California does NOT require the master's now and why the requirement won't kick in until 2008?!?! Anybody have an answer for that?

    Laurie
  9. by   Roaen
    Quote from traumaRUs
    I don't know guys - Illinois ranks up there on the "worst" list. That's why I'm in a generic MSN program - it doesn't pay to be a NP.
    Why do you say Illinois is up there on the worst list?
    I'm thinking of moving to Chicago eventually, so would like to know what I'm heading into after I finish grad school for nursing.
  10. by   HOPE2BNP
    Actually, I have the same question. I was considering NP school in Illinois. Is that a bad idea?



    Quote from Roaen
    Why do you say Illinois is up there on the worst list?
    I'm thinking of moving to Chicago eventually, so would like to know what I'm heading into after I finish grad school for nursing.
  11. by   prospective
    i read your posting that illinois is one of the worst states.... why is that? I am originally from Chicago, but currently living in Boston. I am applying for direct entry programs and considering moving back to IL, any thoughtS?
    thanks.



    Quote from traumaRUs
    I don't know guys - Illinois ranks up there on the "worst" list. That's why I'm in a generic MSN program - it doesn't pay to be a NP.
  12. by   EricTAMUCC-BSN
    Quote from Roland
    We live in Indiana, but are wanting to move to Hawaii, Nevada or possibly Texas. How do those states fit into the mix?

    Texas is a great place to live and work as an RN. The pay is good, we enjoy much autonomy, and there is less competition for high ranking positions.
  13. by   MikeyBSN
    I was wondering if anyone knows how nj is when it comes to NP scopes of practice. I was also curious as to the NP scope of practice when it comes to procedures. For example, can they put in central lines ect. When working for a doctor/hospital do they have NP's treat only "fast track" patients (I was wondering because I would be interested in working in the ER or helping to manage cancer or HIV patients)?

    Thanks!

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