NP licensure in multiple states?

  1. 0
    Hi All,
    I'm an FNP student considering moving to the Northeast, rural Mass/Vermont, and there may be multiple job opportunities across state lines. Given that Vermont and Massachusetts have slightly different practice laws, is it possible to be licensed and prescribing in both states?
  2. 10 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    I'm licensed in 3 states. You can go for more if you want.
  4. 0
    Why not? I'm also licensed in more than one state though I haven't practiced in more than one state at the same time but I do know some NP's who have done that, mainly in some of the rural southern states.
  5. 0
    What is the process of getting licensed in another state? Is it just fees and paperwork?
  6. 0
    The first step is to fill out and send back the state's application for both an RN license and NP certification and pay the fees. This process is called licensure by endorsement. Eligibility criteria varies by state. The RN License from one state is usually easily endorsed to another state once you pass the NCLEX-RN which is the national board exam for RN's. Some states have stricter educational requirements even for entry level RN training (i.e., Excelsior grads are not eligible for RN licensure in some states). One can not endorse an NP certification without being eligible for RN license endorsement as well. NP certification can be endorsed depending on each state's APN requirements. Many states require NP education at the graduate degree level and passing a nationally administered NP board exam (such as ANCC, AANP, PNCB, NCC).

    States like California have additional license for NP's called Furnishing License which allows them to prescribe meds.
  7. 0
    No, it not just fees and paper work...depends if the state has reciprocity with your home state (the state of your residence). Some states are easier than others...Arkansas was by far the easiest...Maryland the worst (for me)...Missouri was not so bad but I moved there when they first permitted NPs to prescribe controlled substances and well...that was a whole diffferent battle.
    Then there is your DEA...your DEA is attached to one agency, company...and sometimes this causes problems. Case in point, I still work in Missouri, live in Maryland, licensed in both states for 3 different specialities. My DEA is now attached to the Maryland site as I work more hours there, but I had to make sure they didnt removed the Missouri site (although it doesnt show on my certificate), it is in the DEA system and allows me to prescribe controlled substances in Missouri.
  8. 0
    Hi Miss PsychNP - your post brought a question to mind. I recently became licensed in a neighboring state in order to work on an as needed basis at another facility. The licensing process was rather smooth (because both states are compact states for RN licensure). I was required to obtain two separate DEA numbers for each state. It is my understanding that you are required to have a DEA number for each state that you are prescribing controlled substances in. You can practice at multiple locations in one state with one DEA number, but if you are practicing in another state you are required to have a separate DEA number. Ultimately, I had to pay the $731 fee for a second DEA number (though I was reimbursed by my employer) and will have to keep both numbers active as long as I practice in both states.
  9. 0
    Quote from PsychNM
    Hi Miss PsychNP - your post brought a question to mind. I recently became licensed in a neighboring state in order to work on an as needed basis at another facility. The licensing process was rather smooth (because both states are compact states for RN licensure). I was required to obtain two separate DEA numbers for each state. It is my understanding that you are required to have a DEA number for each state that you are prescribing controlled substances in. You can practice at multiple locations in one state with one DEA number, but if you are practicing in another state you are required to have a separate DEA number. Ultimately, I had to pay the $731 fee for a second DEA number (though I was reimbursed by my employer) and will have to keep both numbers active as long as I practice in both states.
    You are correct. You can have a DEA license for multiple states as well. I have a Michigan and California DEA. You do have to pay for each.
  10. 0
    Very interesting. I will most likely sit for my RN-NCLEX and NP boards in CA, but will probably look to practice outside CA (thinking WA or OR) as a NP. Maybe I should look into how the licenses transfer for those specific states.
  11. 0
    Quote from myelin
    Very interesting. I will most likely sit for my RN-NCLEX and NP boards in CA, but will probably look to practice outside CA (thinking WA or OR) as a NP. Maybe I should look into how the licenses transfer for those specific states.
    If it's any comfort, I had a co-worker here who moved to Portland and had no issues endorsing there (was a MS graduate of the institution you go to school at, and BSN from a school in NM). Another colleague who worked in the same medical center moved to Seattle and had no issues either (a MS graduate from Yale). My point is, these guys have been all over the US and went to school in different places and practiced in different states.


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