Have any NPs considered med school? - page 3

I know threads about considering medical school are often posted in the general forums, but I'm wondering how many NPs have actually considered med school as an option? Why did you choose to become... Read More

  1. by   ErinRNBSN
    Recently I heard the AMA is pushing for all APN's to be supervised in practice. I live in Illinois, the headquarters of the AMA, and this is terrifying some NP's. For all the work we had done and try to do to promote our career and the AMA could jeopardize it all it one swift movement.
    Due to this news I have been reconsidering Med school. I have about 1.5 years left in ANP program. I discussed these ideas with some NP's and they said it isnt any easier being a female doctor and being looked down upon or inadequate. Why is this sooooo hard!?!?! Didnt we win womens rights decades ago and we are still stuck in a man's world! I was really excited about the N.D. idea, which is where i will have to go if APN's must be supervised.....arent we then just physician assistants anyway??? Any ideas?
  2. by   caldje
    Quote from ErinRNBSN
    Recently I heard the AMA is pushing for all APN's to be supervised in practice. I live in Illinois, the headquarters of the AMA, and this is terrifying some NP's. For all the work we had done and try to do to promote our career and the AMA could jeopardize it all it one swift movement.
    Due to this news I have been reconsidering Med school. I have about 1.5 years left in ANP program. I discussed these ideas with some NP's and they said it isnt any easier being a female doctor and being looked down upon or inadequate. Why is this sooooo hard!?!?! Didnt we win womens rights decades ago and we are still stuck in a man's world! I was really excited about the N.D. idea, which is where i will have to go if APN's must be supervised.....arent we then just physician assistants anyway??? Any ideas?
    erin, physician assistants don't have to be any more supervised than NPs. Look up the laws. I am sad to say it sounds like you are in a situation at your school where you are recieving a lot of poor and inaccurate information. The majority of students in medical school right now are female, your PA remark was off, and there is no chance that the AMA can just go around changing the lefislature in all 50 states to change the verbage from "collaborative" to "supervisory" which meane the SAME thing anyways.

    good luck
  3. by   sgent
    NP/PA supervision is a state by state issue.

    At least in my state (MS), NP's & PA's are essentially interchangable from a physician / hospital perspective. They both have a fairly broad practice. I would expect PA's would be similar in most states -- since they generally have the same training as most NP's (Bachelor & Master's degree w/ practicum). There maybe some Bachelor's degree PA programs left, but I imagine there won't be in 10 years. It was only recently (last 10-15yr) that a Masters was required for an NP as well.

    As for supervision that's a state by state issue. In my area supervision means that a physician must audit and sign off on 10% of your charts, be on hand 10% of the time, and sign off on your protocols. They also have to be willing to accept referrals. NP's in this area certainly can and do have independent practices, and hire physicians on a contract basis to provide supervision. In some cases in very rural areas NP's are allowed wider latitude than listed above (with Nursing Board and Medical Board approval).
  4. by   HididiScribbler
    I can't seem to make up my mind between eventually becoming a NP or a MD...not that I really HAVE to, now (although, what I decide will change what classes I need to take during the summers now...). Making it through nursing school first is a good idea .
    I guess, one question I have, is, do you NPs feel that your education was adequate? That seems to be the one thing that doctors get all riled up about... when I look at what I want to do, eventually, NP seems to fit in much more with the type of life I want (eventually, I do want a family and I feel that as a NP I'd be able to see my family more...) and I like the nursing model and I wouldn't mind collaborating with physicians, but I worry that not having those four years of med school and residency would make a big difference in what I'd be able to do. That doesn't SEEM to be the case, at all, since NPs do give such good care, though...
    I guess what keeps stopping me from being SURE about wanting to be a NP is that I really want the medical EDUCATION (especially all of the science)...but I think I want the outlook, and the job of a NP... aah, it's all so confusing.
  5. by   NeuroMedic
    I started off as an RN/Paramedic attending MTSU for a Bachelor of Science
    in Nursing; Currently I am working on my graduate nursing degree;

    During my time as a ugrad, I made sure to take extra math/chemistry/anatomy
    courses etc to aid in my plans to pursue an M.D. in the long run.

    Once I get my N.P.; I will be switching over to the school of medicine
    for an M.D.

    ---
    As far as the whole M.D. practice without residency. I can't think of
    any facility in their right mind that would hire on someone without
    a proper residency.

    Imagines, "No, I'm not a Doc, but I did stay at a Holiday Inn last night!"
  6. by   HididiScribbler
    Quote from NeuroMedic
    ]
    During my time as a ugrad, I made sure to take extra math/chemistry/anatomy
    courses etc to aid in my plans to pursue an M.D. in the long run.

    Once I get my N.P.; I will be switching over to the school of medicine
    for an M.D.
    Out of curiosity...what made you decide to go for the MD instead of sticking with the NP? Why did you decide to become a NP first, instead of just going from getting your bachelor's, to med school? Sorry for all the questions, just curious!
  7. by   gauge14iv
    I dont know any RN, NP, PA or MD who feels their education was adequate enough. EVERYONE has the commonality of feeling that when they graduated they were not prepared enough to do what it is that they are supposed to be doing.
  8. by   NeuroMedic
    Quote from HididiScribbler
    Out of curiosity...what made you decide to go for the MD instead of sticking with the NP? Why did you decide to become a NP first, instead of just going from getting your bachelor's, to med school? Sorry for all the questions, just curious!


    I have wanted to be an M.D. since I was 14 yo; I knew this was my mission
    in life. I chose to go Nursing instead of Pre-med for several reasons:

    1. Clinical Skillsets, etc
    2. Ability to work in a hospital with pt(Premed is math/chem, all the time;
    nurse can work in the hospital; I got my Pmed license so I could work
    with pt while receiving my RN).

    3. Pt contact--A Doc treats and streets; RN gets to know their pt
    and develops a special bond with each and every one of them.

    4. Experience; I have worked the field under many different titles:
    LifeFlight, Pre-Hospital Critical Care, Trauma, I.C.U.

    As an M.D.; I will have alot of experience to draw off of.

    5. I will never get fclearance for my N-Methyl-D-Aspartate receptor
    antagonism study as a nurse.
  9. by   cgfnp
    Quote from sunnyjohn
    There has been talk for years of these type of bridging programs. A few have been proposed.

    One example: http://easteadjr.org/guest.html


    This type of program may not be too far away with a proposed doctor shortage in non-urban areas.

    But I would not bank on them. Opposition from all sides will be FIERCE.

    You would be better served pursuing the educational prereq's needed for admission to an established NP, MD/DO program.
    I wonder when this article was written?

    It was very well thought and written, and makes total sense. How could anyone argue with this (although I know they will). I am a rural NP and would jump all over this immediately, even if it cost an additional $100K. I am at a loss to explain why this isn't in place.

    They may gripe because we took a different and (they'll say, "easier") path, but how can you even say that? I have 8 years of total undergrad and grad school including every premed science completed. I would choose the traditional path if I were starting over as I think that would be much easier than the PA/NP to MD route proposed. However, it would solve a lot of the rural health care problem and give some of us a chance to learn more and become better prepared clinicians that we (I) so desparately want. I'm sure we get made fun of by doctors for "practicing medicine without a license" or "not knowing our a** from a hole in the ground" or "taking the easy route". You know what my answer is? It's much harder than what they are doing. You think I like trying to be a diagnostician on a difficult case when a child's life may weigh in the balance? You think it's hard being a doctor? Try being a doctor without going to medical school. That is hard! It sucks! I can't stand not knowing every answer. I know no one knows every answer, but I sure would know a lot more of them if a med school would open up a new route for training. To those who are preparing to type, "why don't you just go to medical school?" I have a wife and daughter I'm just not willing to drag through the traditional style.
  10. by   cormann
    ^^^^

    I totally agree. This perspective is a unique one and one that I am sure would be met with much criticism. I agree that NP's have an enormous amount of schooling behind them and should have access to continuing medical education, especially taking advantage of online learning. I am also curious to know if this thought has been explored by others and when this passage was written.
  11. by   KimHFNP
    Hi, I have been an FNP for a year. I am also a Registered Dietitian. I did a Master's Entry Program to be an FNP. Anyway, I love being a Nurse Practitioner. I do not want to be an MD. The roles are completely different from my perspective and I think that there is a place for both MDs and NPs in the health care field. I am not meant to do everything an MD does, that is why we do not have as much schooling. Now I know that many NPs do a great deal of 'on the job' training and do function in a closer role to an MD, and that is fine. Those NP's have, in a sense, completed a 'residency'. I love having the ability to refer very complicated patients out to MDs and I love not having all of the responsiblity of the MDs that I work with. Now, I have that privelege because I am not paid as well as the MD's I work with. I am not trying to ruffle any feathers out there, this has been my experience and I realize that it is not everybody's. Just wanted to give a different perspective.
  12. by   CrazyPremed
    Bump.
  13. by   NPs Save Lives
    Quote from HididiScribbler
    I can't seem to make up my mind between eventually becoming a NP or a MD...not that I really HAVE to, now (although, what I decide will change what classes I need to take during the summers now...). Making it through nursing school first is a good idea .
    I guess, one question I have, is, do you NPs feel that your education was adequate? That seems to be the one thing that doctors get all riled up about... when I look at what I want to do, eventually, NP seems to fit in much more with the type of life I want (eventually, I do want a family and I feel that as a NP I'd be able to see my family more...) and I like the nursing model and I wouldn't mind collaborating with physicians, but I worry that not having those four years of med school and residency would make a big difference in what I'd be able to do. That doesn't SEEM to be the case, at all, since NPs do give such good care, though...
    I guess what keeps stopping me from being SURE about wanting to be a NP is that I really want the medical EDUCATION (especially all of the science)...but I think I want the outlook, and the job of a NP... aah, it's all so confusing.
    I think that anyone's education is what they put into it. I've seen incompetence on both sides of the coin (MD or NP). We diagnose, treat and take care of patients very similarly to MDs. I think the main concern should be taking care of people and not quibbling over what kind of degree they have.

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