Dissappointed-

  1. Hi! I'm a nursing student that has hoped to one day be a NP. It has nothing to do with money. I'm working in a hospital right now, not for the money but because I love it and want to get experience. I'm dissapointed in what I've read here in the posts. It seems that the general feeling is that there is an overflow of NP, and that if you don't have 10+ years of experience you are completely unqualified to be a NP. If I stay on the track that I'm on I'll be a NP in about 7 years, but not a lot of experience as a nurse. I'm getting the feeling that most of you think that would make me a completely unqualified NP.
    Would love to get some encouragement here as I believe that this is something that I would really love to do but don't like the thought of spending all that time(not to mention money) and still be considered unqualified in my profession.
    I also don't have a desire to go to school to be something in which the world has more then enough of. So if there really are way too many NP please make that clear to me.
    I love caring for people and would have no problem with working as an RN,LPN, whatever. But have the oppertunity to go to school now and am afraid if I don't persue my dreams now they won't happen at all.
    (I have a husband that makes enough money to support us and is suportive. In this day and age, this education might come in handy one day)
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  2. 9 Comments

  3. by   meandragonbrett
    If it's what you want to do why don't you do it? It shouldn't matter if there are more than enough NPs or not enough.
  4. by   LoriT
    Thank you, how very true.
  5. by   meandragonbrett
    I say, go to school, go to NP school (if that's what you want) and be the best NP you possibly can.
  6. by   Traveler
    I think part of the country and what niche you want to get into has a lot to do with it. Also who you know in the medical community can be very helpful. Since I have been doing home health for so many years, I know it is my love. I also know that I want to have my FNP which I am starting to work on now. I halve already talked to my family MD about me doing visits for patients that can't come to the office. There were 3 ads in my paper (Knoxville is the closest large paper we get) for NP'a

    If it is something you want to do, do it. I was getting tired of getting paid about the same as new grads and knowing so much more. I also realized that I was giving the doctors good advice about patients that he usually followed. I saw that my earnings potential were never going to change much so that is my reason.

    If it's something in your heart- don't put it off. You will always be able to use it.
  7. by   LoriT
    Thank you for your reply. Becoming a NP is something that I really want to do and am willing to work hard towards becoming the best I can be. I was just disappointed at the negativety towards NP's that don't have x number of nursing experience and also the fact that so many seem to think that there are already way too many NP's.
  8. by   Jayla
    Truth be told, there is a PCP shortage in far too many rural and inner city areas of this country. That INCLUDES NPs and PAs. So, if you are flexible and willing to relocate, you shouldn't have any problem whatsoever finding an NP position.

    I'm an RN and will be returning to earn my master's (FNP) next year after only one year of RN experience. There is no one way to navigate your education, and as far as I've seen, there has been no research conducted to determine "how many years a nurse needs to work at such and such position before entering a master's program..."

    I've found, everyone thinks THEIR was of doing it is the RIGHT way. Do what is right for you and your family. Also, take note of all the positive comments on this board about nurses going on to become NPs...there are quite a few from what I've seen.
  9. by   lalaxton
    Things change considerably in 7 years, who knows there may be a shortage of NP's by then!
  10. by   FNP/DNP
    Quote from LoriT
    Thank you for your reply. Becoming a NP is something that I really want to do and am willing to work hard towards becoming the best I can be. I was just disappointed at the negativety towards NP's that don't have x number of nursing experience and also the fact that so many seem to think that there are already way too many NP's.
    I only had a couple of years of nursing experience and it made no difference for me. I found a job and learned quickly. You will too. I do think the NP market is somewhat saturated, but as others have said, it depends where you live.
  11. by   Jo Dirt
    Lori, I'm an LPN finishing up my ASN and I want to go to NP school. Luckily, my husband is open to moving and trying out new things and we are looking at Idaho because NP's there have so much autonomy.
    I was also getting discouraged reading some of the threads complaining about the flood of NP's in this country. However, the recent Newsweek magazine gives a different spin, it talks about how many NP's are needed, especially in rural and urban areas.
    I believe in being realistic but not negative and cynical (I think this board sometimes turns into a pity party board) and I have decided that my life will be no worse regardless of how many NP's are out there already. If you are willing to work at it you will find your niche.

    When I was in LPN school there was a big sign up as you walked in the door. It said "Your life can ONLY improve by becoming a nurse!" I believe that is so true, especially when I see factories closing down all around me and see people standing in line as I drive by the unemployment office in town, while I have a great job as a private duty nurse. I sit with an elderly couple from 7pm-7am. They even have a room for me with a bed. I watch tv or study for a few hours then I lay down to sleep. They buzz me if they need me, which they rarely ever do. Then I get up and come home. The job pays over $200 a night. I am so blessed to have this job. Go for whatever you feel like will make you feel fulfilled.
    But if you go to the LPN board you will read complaints about not being able to find a job as an LPN. But as you may know, LPN's are everywhere and if you are an unemployed LPN it is because you do not want to work.

    Uhh...I got a pretty nasty pm b/c of the last sentence in this post, so I'll revise it a little. I have never seen an area where an LPN could not find a "job." Many complain that the only jobs they could get are in a nursing home and they hate nursing homes. Your LPN school did you a terrible disservice if they didn't make it clear that most jobs for LPN's are in nursing homes.
    Last edit by Jo Dirt on Feb 5, '05

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