ANCC to retire most popular, and eventually all, NP roles. - page 2

I just received an official notice from ANCC that my credential will be “retired.” My credential is “Adult Nurse Practitioner,” but other credentials on the chopping block are ACNP, Adult and Child... Read More

  1. Visit  elkpark profile page
    7
    Quote from awiler
    current certifications will remain in place for as long as you renew by meeting the requirements on the renewal application at the time of your renewal.
    yeah, yeah, yeah -- i get the letters saying that, too. all that means to me is that the ancc is happy to keep taking my money (recertification fees) while showing complete disregard for my education, skills, and experience.
    Tinabeanrn, mystory, SE_BSN_RN, and 4 others like this.
  2. Visit  juan de la cruz profile page
    2
    ANCC:

    Thanks for responding. The question that is being raised here (at least in the case of ANP's and Adult ACNP's and our Adult CNS counterparts) is why grandfathering was never considered when the new titles AGNP-BC, AGACNP-BC, and AGCNS-BC are implemented. My understanding was the Consensus Model streamlined the Adult APN specialties because it is a no-brainer that these particular specialties have always incorporated training to include management of a population that include those in the adult age range and up (which would include the elderly). Traditionally, ANP's and ACNP's have cared for elderly cleints and to my knowledge, there has been no restrictions on our scope of practice in any state of jurisdiction in terms of managing this population in the past.
    Last edit by juan de la cruz on Dec 7, '11
    Jarnaes and CCRNDiva like this.
  3. Visit  CraigB-RN profile page
    4
    Sorry, to me this is just another reason to go to PA school and not NP school.
    CCL RN, Jarnaes, Purple_Scrubs, and 1 other like this.
  4. Visit  traumaRUs profile page
    5
    I too received the "letter" as I'm an adult CNS.

    My education (I graduated in 2006) included adult chronic, adult acute and adult geriatric.

    They are listed as such on my transcripts. So, since going back to school yet again (I'm also a peds CNS) is not an option, its just frustrating to know that we are now considered second rate.
    Tinabeanrn, hoosier guy, Jarnaes, and 2 others like this.
  5. Visit  RPF,PhD,NP profile page
    0
    Rich2008 - you should wait until the PMHNP programs are streamlined. There will be only one PMHNP. Just like I thought, in agreement with Juan, there would be a streamlined Adult NP credential. Never did I imagine ANCC would retire the test - not the credential.
  6. Visit  RPF,PhD,NP profile page
    1
    I have some news to report! No, your NP credential is still being moved towards irrelevance. However, I did speak with a high level executive from “big name brand credentialing board” last night. This executive was very pleasant, extremely helpful, answered all my questions, and does his or her job very well. I did appreciate and value the call. The summary highlights are, the train has left the station, the exam is being retired NOT the credential (huh!?), never allow your certification to expire, let’s hold hands. Kumbaya.

    I believe - in fact - I KNOW in my heart that ANCC and the other Nurse Gods have the best intentions in their actions. NOTE: I mean no disrespect by the term Nurse Gods, but there are so many groups involved in this, that’s the best term I have. However, as you might suspect, I have some concerns.

    In most states, a NP’s certification is a de facto license. No certification, no practice, no livelihood. Of course, the legislature and state boards of nursing have agreed (so I’ve been assured) to grandfather all retired NP credentials - today. What happens tomorrow, or in five years? Seriously! This is the same legislation that has not agreed upon a national budget in years, and actively writes discriminatory, homophobic, and xenophobic language into state constitutions (some exclusions apply). This is also the same legislation that allows NPs to practice to their full scope and ability (Washington), while others will not allow NPs to freeze a wart (Alabama). So, people can buy wart-freeze OTC, but in the eyes of the state legislature, NPs are not competent enough to provide this treatment. Yes, Ladies and Gentlemen, I feel so much better.

    Of course, ANCC is not offering any bridge for an NP with a retired credentialed to move into the new and improved credential. No, too many NP programs have not been up to snuff, or at least, it is too difficult or impossible to isolate those slacker programs. The solution is this bright line that must be drawn in the sand, and all those behind it, retired; all those in front of it, magically and angelically competent enough to receive this new credential. Where are these rogue NP programs slinging out disparate degrees? And have our credentialing bodies been asleep at the wheel? A lot of really smart people worked together over a decade, and this was the best solution they could come up with. And these are the same people we are supposed to trust will have our best interest in mind going forward.

    Now, for all those inadequately prepared NPs currently in practice, clearly public safety is not the issue. Because, if that were the issue, then we – you - us would be required to seek specific continuing education to fill in our perceived knowledge gap. However, if anyone wishes to go to their local graduate program where faculty will happily perform a gap analysis to evaluate your deficiency. Then, the school will allow you to apply to their program, register for appropriate course work, and graciously accept your tuition. This all assumes you have access to a program, that you are accepted, and that there is adequate faculty and mentors to educate you. Now, I’ve read we are facing a dire faculty shortage, yet these new requirement seem to only place additional pressure on resources that are already scarce. I fail to see the logic in that. Especially since this education could be done via alternate methods. Is this about safety, or is this about hand greasing to keep graduate programs flush in cash? Seems we can’t force the BSN as entry to practice, so APNs have become the latest whipping boy.

    I have nothing against education. That is not the issue. The issue is changing the rules to obtain credentialing without a bridging option. I was told by the Nurse Gods that for those NPs who were required to return to class that they were always appreciative of their learning experience. Of course! I love learning! I gain nuggets of knowledge while reading subjects where I am considered an expert. No one is disparaging education. This is not about education or degree programs. I firmly believe the more educated our profession becomes, the better our profession will be. However, sometimes we (as a profession) need to demand our own bright line in the sand when it comes to graduate education. At some point, this feels like a hamster chasing a carrot on a treadmill. I hope you will unite with me on facebook to protest this move, united. The group is occupy ancc, so no to retiring your NP credential
    kanzi monkey likes this.
  7. Visit  RPF,PhD,NP profile page
    2
    BTW, my protest to these changes were deleted from another website, along with my membership to a certain credentialing body's group. I guess if you don't tote the line, you're eliminated. Oops.
    on eagles wings and mystory like this.
  8. Visit  juan de la cruz profile page
    6
    Quote from RPF,PhD,NP
    Of course, ANCC is not offering any bridge for an NP with a retired credentialed to move into the new and improved credential. No, too many NP programs have not been up to snuff, or at least, it is too difficult or impossible to isolate those slacker programs. The solution is this bright line that must be drawn in the sand, and all those behind it, retired; all those in front of it, magically and angelically competent enough to receive this new credential. Where are these rogue NP programs slinging out disparate degrees? And have our credentialing bodies been asleep at the wheel? A lot of really smart people worked together over a decade, and this was the best solution they could come up with. And these are the same people we are supposed to trust will have our best interest in mind going forward.
    This is the question that never got answered. All that ANCC representative did was repost the FAQ's that were already sent out to all ANCC certified APN's. There has to be a mechanism for APN's in adult specialties to transition into the new credential. Our previous experience working with older adults should be considered in addition to possibly a graduate course (no more than 3 credits) in Gerontology should suffice.
    Tinabeanrn, PumpkinEater, Jarnaes, and 3 others like this.
  9. Visit  reeya profile page
    3
    This is the most ridiculous idea I've ever heard...retiring your 2-3yrs of education as not valid...what the heck??? The few NPs who sit on ANCC board must be just plain ignorant...how can a degree be retired so easily. Oh yeah...we have the power, lets mess them up..lol ! These are the same NPs who fight tooth and nail to be recognized as physician equivalent "DNP"s but in their curriculum: health policy, nursing theory, community nursing, nursing research, Advance practice role etc are core classes then you're thrown into the wolves. They dont think advance anatomy & physiology, diagnostics/labs, derm, radiology etc are important. The heck with ANCC...too much politics shoved into our throat.
  10. Visit  criticalcare rn profile page
    10
    I am currently in the DNP program and I have to agree with reeya 100%. How is nursing research,informatics and other non medical courses going to make us better practitioners. I think a doctorate program should have core courses such as radiology, ID,GI and courses that really expand our knowledge base. I'm not sure how my informatics course will benefit me or the patients I see.
  11. Visit  rich2008 profile page
    2
    Thank you RPF. I will wait and see what happens with the mental health certifications. some schools I have looked at seem to have placed their mental health programs on hold.
    I should call ANCC. I did both adult and gero and was qualified to take both certifications, bit just took adult. when it comes time for renewal maybe I should just take the new exam if its cheaper than renewing. ridiculous.
    Jarnaes and dianao1 like this.
  12. Visit  rn.d86 profile page
    0
    This topic has really caught my attention. I am unable to understand why the powers that be are not offering a mechanism to convert an old credential to a newer one. This seems like a way of dividing the profession.
    I see that the FNP credential will be up for review in the next several years. Many nurses will be starting FNP programs in 2012. Based on the information we now know, do you think there is any reason to hold off on attending a FNP program until we see what changes are made?
  13. Visit  kyboyrn profile page
    0
    Reading this makes me glad I went with the FNP certification, and that I am certified with the AANP. I work in emergency medicine, and although I was advised by some that the Adult NP route was the way to go if I wanted to do ER, I was lucky enough to have a friend who told me otherwise. He was certified in Adult care, and he attempted to get a job at a few different emergency rooms, and no one would hire him because he couldn't treat children. So, he went back and got his family certification so that he could get a job (at the same ER I work at). Also, in regards to what the author who started this discussion was talking about as far as geriatric care, I feel that our FNP program adequately covered geriatric care. Actually, one semester was focused quite extensively on the aging population, which is great because in the ER, the elderly (as well as children) make up a large poriton of our patient population. I see the goal of what the ANCC is doing, but I disagree with how they are doing it, and that they are actually doing it. I am sorry to all of the APNs that are in these specialties that they are phasing out. I do disagree with the initial posters idea that the family practice certification may be phased out in the future. I think that the biggest push for nurse practitioners is in the family practice area, to fill the void of a decreasing amount of family practice physicians, and to provide primary care to patients across the lifespan in rural areas. I think if there were to be only one remaining certification (which I hope never, ever happens obviously...we need all of our APN specialties as far as I'm concerned) I think the family practice certification would remain. The AANP has less certification choices, so all of this streamlining won't affect APNs certified with them I suppose. I personally chose them because of a variety of reasons, but I'm kinda glad I did now. Continue to advocate for the varying certifications, and maybe with enough support, there will be some changes to what the ANCC actually does in the long run. Sorry if I got a little long winded guys. Worked a long busy 12 in the ED, and I'm not able to sleep, and I gotta be back at it in the morning!! Loving my job as a ER NP thought!!!

Need Help Searching For Someone's Comment? Enter your keywords in the box below and we will display any comment that matches your keywords.



Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and find your dream job.

Top
close
close