2015 DNP Requirement for APNs - page 5

by IcanHealYou

Hey everyone, Is it true that all NPs and other APNs will have to finish off their DNP in order to achieve NP status after 2015? I'm currently applying for FNP school and I'm getting worried about this. I may or may not... Read More


  1. 1
    Quote from SycamoreStudent
    I think we see now how the DNP will become a requirement, by schools who want 2 more years of tuition.
    Amen! Unfortunately.............
    kalevra likes this.
  2. 1
    Quote from BlueDevil,DNP
    I've said it before, I'll say it again. I was a critical care nurse for over 20 years before going back to school. It hasn't made an iota of difference in my FNP practice. I had a slight advantage in school over classmates that didn't already know normal labs values and a cardiac assessment inside and out, but the playing field was more than leveled by the time we were six weeks in. RN and APN practice is simply so utterly different that RN experience lends almost zero to APN practice. No one wants to believe that 20 years of their life was wasted, lol, but there you have it. It doesn't mean a hill of beans for what I do now.
    I don't question that that was your experience as a critical care nurse going into an FNP program (two specialties that could be considered exact opposites of each other, which may be a factor in this), but that may not be everyone's experience. I went through my psych CNS grad program as an experienced psych RN with two direct-entry student classmates, and I watched them really flounder and struggle to grasp concepts and skills that any RN with any psych experience would have already known. I have also precepted one psych graduate student who was an RN with experience other than psych nursing, and she, also, really struggled and floundered trying to grasp just the most basic concepts of psychiatric advanced practice that would have been second nature to any RN with generalist psych experience.

    However, I do recognize that that doesn't mean there is necessarily any difference in outcome over the long haul. For what it's worth, my direct-entry classmates ended up not working as psych CNSs; one of them went into an administrative role almost immediately, and the other went into a different line of work entirely (non-nursing).
    wtbcrna likes this.
  3. 0
    Hmm. I'm in a direct entry psych NP program, but I have an extensive psych background, especially in conducting assessments and differential diagnosis. (non-nursing). I'm interested in seeing what the learning curve will be like.
  4. 0
    This issue is making me crazy as I try to plan my nursing schooling. I may (if I get in) have the option of an entry-level MSN program (I'm a second bacc) but it's a CNL program not an NP. (Unfortunately, I didn't sort out that I wanted to go for my NP until the deadlines of this year's entry-level NP programs were past.) My other options are BSN programs. I'd honestly prefer the BSN program but if they amp up the NP requirements to doctorate when, or soon after, I graduate then I'm out of luck. I'll have to spend 2 more years getting my MSN before I can even start a DNP. If I do the CNL MSN, then -- if I understand right -- I could get my DNP in one or two years. Isn't that true?

    I understand that the DNP is just a recommendation at this point but several schools I was considering for entry-level MSN (NP) have just pulled their programs and are replacing them with DNP programs instead. SFSU, Univ. of Vermont and Greenville all did. I'm wondering if the schools are going to make this thing happen, whether we like it or not. If they pull all of the Master's NP programs, we will have to go the DNP route.

    I welcome anyone's advice on the best route to an NP for a (ahem) mature 2nd baccalaureate student like me.
  5. 1
    Seen many schools now offering Bsn to dnp.
    Seems a little crazy going from bachelors to doctorate, but if that's the requirement you have no choice.

    Saw an article today about doctors having group appointments with patients.
    Maybe this will help fnp's because there's no way I will be participating in any group doctors appointments.
    It gives me an image from schinlder's list where all the Jews had to strip in front of each other.
    PMFB-RN likes this.
  6. 0
    Quote from dt70
    Seen many schools now offering Bsn to dnp.
    Seems a little crazy going from bachelors to doctorate, but if that's the requirement you have no choice.
    (Actually, that's a fairly standard and traditional situation in some (most?) other academic disciplines, that individuals go from baccalaureate degree to doctorate. None of my (many) doctorally-prepared friends have Master's degrees.)
  7. 0
    I wonder if MSN programs will become more competitive as they become fewer in number. I'm scheduled to graduate with a BSN in May 2015 and am nervous that there will be so few Master's level programs left, as all schools think it's more lucrative to only offer DNP...
  8. 0
    Quote from priorities2
    I wonder if MSN programs will become more competitive as they become fewer in number. I'm scheduled to graduate with a BSN in May 2015 and am nervous that there will be so few Master's level programs left, as all schools think it's more lucrative to only offer DNP...
    I expect so. There are 5 CRNA programs in our area, 4 masters programs and one DNP. A friend of mine closly accociated with the DNP CRNA program at the University of Minnesota tells me that the qualiety and quanity of their applicants dropped off considerably when they swithced over from a 24 month MSN program. They didn't add a single clinical hour or clinical related class when they changed to DNP.
  9. 0
    So PMFB-RN do I understand you correctly that the DNP program was the same length as the MSN? Does this require applicants to already have their MSN (as I've seen some programs do) or is it a BSN-DNP that someone else mentioned?

    I'm confused. If the DNP goes straight from a BSN, then what's the difference between it and an MSP?

    I'm going to dig around but I find it difficult to round up answers from the various Nursing Dept. websites. Some are user friendly but many are not.

    Thanks, all.
  10. 0
    Ah, never mind. Univ of Minnesota's site is very clear.

    Home - NURS - DNP, University of Minnesota

    The BSN to DNP program takes 3 years.


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