Ready to be a manager?

  1. I have an opportunity to work in management. My supervisor and co-workers are strongly encouraging me to do so. I'm hesistent because of the potential added stress, lack of management experience, and department politics. As an introverted person, I tend to avoid conflict but at the same time I don't want people to take advantage of me.

    How did you know you were ready for a role in management?
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  2. 5 Comments

  3. by   jrt4
    Quote from advsmuch08
    I have an opportunity to work in management. My supervisor and co-workers are strongly encouraging me to do so. I'm hesistent because of the potential added stress, lack of management experience, and department politics. As an introverted person, I tend to avoid conflict but at the same time I don't want people to take advantage of me.

    How did you know you were ready for a role in management?
    Good questions. I am actually an introvert and have been in management for about 8 years now. Most people in leadership are extroverts and there is certainly a place for both personalities. I think for us introverts we are really good at listening and responding to our staff. We also have a tendency to avoid conflict which can backfire.

    I think the question of being ready is really more about the organization supporting new leaders. At my first manager role I would say it was somewhere in the middle with support. I struggled a little with the added responsibilities but I had people there to go to for help. My 2nd opportunity was great and I was extremely supported but also a little more experienced. My current job is pretty terrible when it comes to support and work/life balance. We are expected to produce results and that is all that matters. For a new manager you would be chewed up and spit out but I have several years of experience so I am able to produce results without much coaching.

    I would encourage you to ask questions of those you would report to regarding support for a new leader. It sounds like your supervisor is encouraging. Look around at other managers...do they look tired, stressed? that is a warning sign. Although there are those negative nancys that will be "tired and stressed" no matter what is going on. You should be able to tell by just speaking with managers about their experiences.

    Good luck!!!
  4. by   advsmuch08
    Thank you for your advice! You brought up some great points to consider. I've thought some day I'd be interested working in management, just didn't expect it now. I'll definitely look into the support offered to new managers.
  5. by   MBARNBSN
    Quote from advsmuch08
    Thank you for your advice! You brought up some great points to consider. I've thought some day I'd be interested working in management, just didn't expect it now. I'll definitely look into the support offered to new managers.
    I like what the above poster pointed out. The only thing I would add is despite the support, you will need to really want to be a manager to be successful if you are new to management. The reason being, management is a tough job. You will be working long hours and you are no one's friend (I mean your direct reports and the manager you report to). In fact, in your case, it is highly possible that your current co-workers who want you to become their manager do not want to be managed and plan to take advantage of you! Thus, look at what supports you will or will not get but also think about the worse case scenario of having to discipline former co-workers and your comfort level with that role. Good managers do not only manage the processes within a department, they manage the people that work in that department. Good luck.
  6. by   SheLaughs
    The best advise I can give you is the same thing I tell all the managers I train:
    Watch. For a month or more, just watch. Learn people. See how they do things. This will help you tremendously when you start really being a manager. You'll know how to approach people, you'll be able to explain why you want to change certain things and give examples of why what's being done now doesn't work, and you'll know your team.
    Best of luck!
  7. by   Orca
    Quote from SheLaughs
    The best advise I can give you is the same thing I tell all the managers I train:
    Watch. For a month or more, just watch. Learn people. See how they do things. This will help you tremendously when you start really being a manager. You'll know how to approach people, you'll be able to explain why you want to change certain things and give examples of why what's being done now doesn't work, and you'll know your team.
    This is terrific advice, and this is my approach whenever I go into a new place. I circulate and observe, watching what works and what doesn't. I don't go in with any preconceived notions about what I'm going to change, and unless I have seen the operation in action, I don't in fact know what needs fixing. I also solicit input from subordinates about what changes might need to be made, and I adopt the best ideas. This helps with staff buy-in on the changes that you make.

    Don't change a lot of things in a short period of time. That makes the work environment chaotic, and it is stressful for those who work for you. Make the most important change first, give your staff time to adjust, then progress.

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