how do you handle verbal fights between employees

  1. I work as a supervisor on 11-7 and sometimes I have to deal with CNAs and RNs calling me in to resolve some conflict and I will admit I do not feel equipped to very productively deal with it. It turns into he said she said , one accusing the other one of lying etc etc. How do you handle it?
    •  
  2. 7 Comments

  3. by   jrt4
    Is it personal or work related?
  4. by   Orca
    I generally tell people that they need to stay focused on the job. We don't have to be best friends, but we do have to get along well enough to get the job done. jrt4 also poses a valid question. If this is personal stuff, you can't solve it for them, and they need to be told to keep it out of the workplace. If it is work related, I would try to determine whether it is just a personality conflict or something with an underlying cause that can be fixed.
  5. by   nursingon
    it was work related. one nurse thought the aid didn't answer the call bell fast enough and lied about asking another one to help.
  6. by   nursingon
    one of the involved nurses has THE WORST attitude and personality. I dread ever having have to talk to her, very confrontational and rude, even when talking to me. No consequences because she always works and we are always short.
  7. by   Orca
    Quote from nursingon
    one of the involved nurses has THE WORST attitude and personality. I dread ever having have to talk to her, very confrontational and rude, even when talking to me. No consequences because she always works and we are always short.
    I don't relish having to talk to people like this, but I know the consequences if I don't. Ultimately, you are in charge, and unpleasant RN has to comply with your orders or be insubordinate - which is a terminatable offense in most places.
  8. by   nurse2033
    The cost of a toxic employee is very high, both in morale and retention. Although unpleasant, you or the manager should counsel the employee, keep records, and fire them if there is no change.
  9. by   MBARNBSN
    I deal with these things in real-time as much as possible. I work on the floors as an Assistant Department Manager (so I am also a Charge RN) and I will attempt to hear out both parties and mediate an understanding that will allow for the two of them to work together now and in the future. If I am told later, after an event, I again will get both sides of the story and ask that both parties talk to each other while I act as the mediator. In general, there is some form of misunderstanding and I will help to point out an understanding that the two of them can agree on. However, in the event that the two of them do not like each other, I remind them both that part of working in healthcare includes being professional and working with people you do not necessarily like (I of course also document all of this just in case it gets worse).

    In any case, to better equip yourself with conflict management, I highly suggest you take classes/courses in this area. My organization offers them throughout the year, but if it did not, I would find courses outside of my place of work to better handle these situations. Also, if you know managers within your organization you see perform some of the skills with which you struggle, talk to him/her to gain more insight.

    Being a good manager is not a natural thing, it is a set of learned skills and habits. Once you are able to learn and apply good management skills and develop good habits of managers it will not be difficult for you to navigate waters that you currently find to be difficult. Good luck, and let us know how you do.
    Last edit by MBARNBSN on Nov 13

close