What would you say to this shocking patient statement? - page 9

by aboucherrn 14,599 Views | 93 Comments

Obese female in her forties admitted from the ED for asthma, allergy list a mile long, takes medication for anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, migraines, chronic back pain, etc. Has packed her comfy jammies, memory foam pillow,... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from doro8144
    The fact is most American doctors go to medical school oversees and most foreign doctors go to school in the U.S...Have her think about that for a while.

    Are you serious, or are you just saying that as something to shut the lady up? lol

    Point of fact is at least 95% of all US residency programs go to the American medical school graduates. If the docs med school education was out of the US, it makes it very tough to get into an American residency program. So, overall, this makes the "most American doctors" part statistically improbable.
  2. 0
    Quote from JZ_RN
    While what you say is true, it's a safety issue is why I don't like it. It's not like I'm chitchatting and the words are mixed up, the communication in healthcare is so vital that poor English skills among other English-speaking patients or coworkers can lead to dangerous problems. And it's not that I'm uncomfortable with my body, it's just that I prefer not to have a man I don't know looking at my most intimate areas, a woman has the same so it's just less uncomfortable.

    Another reason healthcare workers need to be able to hold on to their cell phones. I have used the online translators directly in conversation, and while there is a reading delay, it can go fairly well--but they have to be able to read. If they cannot, you need a direct translator. I know some Spanish, and I am working on refreshing and gaining ground with the language. In the meantime, the iPhone or iPad use of online translators is quite handy for readers.

    Things are changing so much, I am beginning to think that they should make Spanish a requirement in schools. It sure is handy.

    Anyway JZ, I get what you are saying. IDK, depends on how you look at it to me. It doesn't bother me if the physician or nurse is a male or female, so long as they know what they are doing, are courteous, and have some sense of compassion.

    Either situation in most cases can be overcome, and to me, the motivation to overcome such biases, concerns, and barriers increases exponentially with the level of pain or severity of health concern. Thus if the woman isn't in pain, discomfort, or imminent jeopardy, and she feels as she does, then she needs to go to her pre-selected primary physician or pulmonologist, a clinic, or an urgent care center.
  3. 0
    Quote from Ruby Vee
    If this is you trying not to sound too judgmental, I'd hate to see what you're like when you're NOT trying. It's not OK to be a racist, but I guess it is OK to be judgmental about your patient's weight.
    Wait, I am sorry, I don't get this? How is reporting or describing the patient/situation using the word obese judgmental?

    Isn't obese indeed a medical term, which we nurses and healthcare practitioners use? Maybe the OP didn't mean it any other way than as a medical description. IDK.
  4. 1
    Quote from Sparrowhawk
    All of America (Except hte Native Indingenious Americans) Are immigrants.
    Not true.

    Even the natives immigrated here, in various waves of course. The Navajo only immigrated the the Southern United States around the 1400's.

    Nearly every single, all that I am aware of, native tribe have moved from one area to another, displacing and replacing the native tirbes that once lived there again and again.

    I consider everyone born in the United States a native.
    sckimrn likes this.
  5. 1
    Quote from samadams8
    Wait, I am sorry, I don't get this? How is reporting or describing the patient/situation using the word obese judgmental?

    Isn't obese indeed a medical term, which we nurses and healthcare practitioners use? Maybe the OP didn't mean it any other way than as a medical description. IDK.
    You know and we know that the term was used in a pejorative fashion and the overall description of the patient was created to pain the least attractive picture possible. You are being disingenuous if you are attempting to hide behind the term as a medical term.

    Retarded is also a medical term but I doubt anyone would appreciate that being a descriptor either.

    Context my friend, context.
    sckimrn likes this.
  6. 0
    Quote from samadams8
    Another reason healthcare workers need to be able to hold on to their cell phones. I have used the online translators directly in conversation, and while there is a reading delay, it can go fairly well--but they have to be able to read. If they cannot, you need a direct translator. I know some Spanish, and I am working on refreshing and gaining ground with the language. In the meantime, the iPhone or iPad use of online translators is quite handy for readers.

    Things are changing so much, I am beginning to think that they should make Spanish a requirement in schools. It sure is handy.

    Anyway JZ, I get what you are saying. IDK, depends on how you look at it to me. It doesn't bother me if the physician or nurse is a male or female, so long as they know what they are doing, are courteous, and have some sense of compassion.

    Either situation in most cases can be overcome, and to me, the motivation to overcome such biases, concerns, and barriers increases exponentially with the level of pain or severity of health concern. Thus if the woman isn't in pain, discomfort, or imminent jeopardy, and she feels as she does, then she needs to go to her pre-selected primary physician or pulmonologist, a clinic, or an urgent care center.

    I can agree with what you're saying totally, I just personally feel more comfortable with a female doctor if they need to do a pelvic or breast exam. Otherwise it couldn't matter less to me what gender or race a person is. I do struggle with people whose English fluency is poor though, it's so hard to understand is all.
  7. 0
    Quote from Asystole RN
    You know and we know that the term was used in a pejorative fashion and the overall description of the patient was created to pain the least attractive picture possible. You are being disingenuous if you are attempting to hide behind the term as a medical term.

    Retarded is also a medical term but I doubt anyone would appreciate that being a descriptor either.

    Context my friend, context.
    Perhaps, but the fact IS this. I don't know. I don't read minds, and I learned a long time ago about the potential for being wrong--even if one is quite discerning and intuitive. I am not God, thus I will not judge the poster's "contextual" message. This kind of thing only adds to problems in human relations.

    Allow the poster to clarify for himself/herself. We humans are often more wrong that we realize or would admit.

    No, I don't find the use of the word 'retarded,' with the now long-used mentally handicapped the same thing as referring to a person's condition--that is, being obese. The only context is that she was painting a word picture. Obesity is in fact a major risk factor for asthma. Perhaps that is how she was pulling it altogether in her mind as she began to describe the situation and the story.

    I think some are being a little tough on this person is all I am saying.
  8. 0
    Quote from samadams8

    Perhaps, but the fact IS this. I don't know. I don't read minds, and I learned a long time ago about the potential for being wrong--even if one is quite discerning and intuitive. I am not God, thus I will not judge the poster's "contextual" message. This kind of thing only adds to problems in human relations.

    Allow the poster to clarify for himself/herself. We humans are often more wrong that we realize or would admit.

    No, I don't find the use of the word 'retarded,' with the now long-used mentally handicapped the same thing as referring to a person's condition--that is, being obese. The only context is that she was painting a word picture. Obesity is in fact a major risk factor for asthma. Perhaps that is how she was pulling it altogether in her mind as she began to describe the situation and the story.

    I think some are being a little tough on this person is all I am saying.
    All of what you are saying is understood. However, allow us to open your eyes to our rationale. If a patient said an inappropriate prejudiced comment and I'm seeking advice on how I should have handled it, is giving information regarding the patients medical condition, belongings and request for a meal pass going to give you a better chance to give me sound advice? NO. The AMA situation has some relevance, as it is directly related to her prejudiced comment. Obese is a medical term, yes it has a correlation with asthma, but what position does it have in the situation at hand? None
  9. 0
    Quote from SweetPEI
    All of what you are saying is understood. However, allow us to open your eyes to our rationale. If a patient said an inappropriate prejudiced comment and I'm seeking advice on how I should have handled it, is giving information regarding the patients medical condition, belongings and request for a meal pass going to give you a better chance to give me sound advice? NO. The AMA situation has some relevance, as it is directly related to her prejudiced comment. Obese is a medical term, yes it has a correlation with asthma, but what position does it have in the situation at hand? None
    All I'm saying is that in her mind, she saw the patient as a cluster of information. If so, that, at least in my mind, is still a problem.

    We can get caught up in seeing pts as health problems---as well as seeing them as problems. Pts are not clusters of data that are pains in the butts. Aggravating or not, they are people.
    At any rate, it's sadly interesting to try and look at both people's perspectives.You are right. The detailed description isn't necessary. Seems like she is reacting. I just don't think, necessarily, that she was trying to be malicious about the women/pt. I think she was just surprised and frustrated w the pt and her attitude .

    Finally, people complain about pts all the time on this and other sites. Why is this nurse worse than others that vent?
  10. 0
    No one said she is worse than any other nurse that vents. The point is that when we try to call people out on something they have done we, at times, do the very thing we call then out on. So I think it is important to recognize that in us. In this example it was extremely obvious that the OP was reacting. No doubt about that. It showed in the way she presented her post. If it were strictly about the event, some comments may not have been posted, but who knows if comments to this was posted based on the irrelevant information


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