Lateral Violence

  1. 0
    I have posted on this discussion board before about passive aggression not realizing that the term everyone would understand is "lateral violence." So we all know what it is. I have been dealing with this hell for 2 years now. I felt so locked into my job because it took me so long to get a job. I have gone up as far on the chain of command as I can. I have put in for a transfer. I have tried to appeal to these people but my head nurse is a master manipulator and no matter how many times I try, I am always put in a negative light. The meaner she is, the more I am forced to either pretend it isn't happening and ignore her or deal with it. She crosses the line when she messes with me professionally. I am so afraid of retribution. I work nights and nights are very difficult to staff. So that is yet another reason I can't deal with this. The hospital is unwilling to let her go even knowing how horrible she has been to me. The rest of the group of my peers gives in to stay on her good side because nobody wants to be on her bad side.

    Has anyone dealt with this and if so, what worked? I am especially interested in people who have successfully gotten the administration to deal with the person without losing the respect of their peers.

    Thanking you in advance.
  2. 43 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    It would be helpful if you provide us with specific and factual situations that you are perceiving as lateral violence. My two cents...you had been a nurse for more than two years, it seems; seek another job.
    End of problem.
  4. 0
    I am so tired. I don't feel like I have the energy to write out two years of drama. Read any commentary on lateral violence and that is what I've been through. Do you know that the only advice I ever get is, "Change jobs?" Nobody has any advice to offer but that. I don't like that plan because it would mean having this person who has been torturing me win and that seems ridiculous. Nobody should get away with this kind of junk. Has anyone out there ever gone to human resources and gotten action or has that been a fail. I would like to hear from anyone who has tried that. I have plenty of documentation and proof. I know what is happening has been identified by nurses as wrong. But can it be resolved through that means?
  5. 3
    Why are you expending so much time and energy in an environment that you consider toxic??
    If you had exausted all the official channels at your facility to solve the issue, with not results...either get a new job (I know...you hear it before) or consider lawying up.
    Altra, psu_213, and nrsang97 like this.
  6. 0
    Quote from Sensibility
    I am so tired. I don't feel like I have the energy to write out two years of drama. Read any commentary on lateral violence and that is what I've been through. Do you know that the only advice I ever get is, "Change jobs?" Nobody has any advice to offer but that. I don't like that plan because it would mean having this person who has been torturing me win and that seems ridiculous. Nobody should get away with this kind of junk. Has anyone out there ever gone to human resources and gotten action or has that been a fail. I would like to hear from anyone who has tried that. I have plenty of documentation and proof. I know what is happening has been identified by nurses as wrong. But can it be resolved through that means?
    Per TOS this is not at all meant to be legal advice. It is certainly up to you to seek or not seek legal advice.

    Are you a Union facility? If so, go to your union rep. for assistance.

    If you are not a union facility, your parent company has an ethics hotline to report such behaviors.

    Make sure your information is not all subjective. This is difficult. Use concrete examples.

    Your parent company should also have an HR departments that usually include employee relation departments. They can investigate complaints if warranted.

    If this is a JHACO or Medicare facility, see what they have as far as complaint lines.

    One of the most difficult things is to believe that you will not be believed. It is a scary place to be.

    Another thought is to speak to your malpractice insurance company. They can give good advice on how to proceed, and protect yourself in the process.

    If things are that overwhelming, maybe you are not the only one who has seen it. One of the things that work about reporting to someone higher than yourself is that they have the authority to do something about it,even if it is to give confidentiality to other nurses who come forward, and other things that can't usually be done on a local level.

    If you are not union (and if you are it is in your union contract) look at your policies regarding workplace violence. Sometimes there's a "hotline" to discuss these concerns. Your union rep locally and regionally also are learned in this.

    Good luck and contact your insurance to protect yourself.
  7. 0
    I dealt with this for a year at my last job (not a nursing job) with multiple people. Anywhere from sexual harassment to people spreading rumors and calling me names to other people. When I reported (many times) nothing happened. When I got fed up after one jealous coworker calling me not so nice names.. I was told because of my reputation, I will not be taken seriously and my reports won't be taken seriously.

    I quit. In Michigan you can collect unemployment for repeatly reporting this and nothing happening which forced you to quit. I'd look into it because if it isn't going to get better there isn't much you can do. Short from suing and getting a lawyer.
  8. 0
    If you truly have plenty of documentation and you have exhausted all resources at your facility, I would check with your state labor board. Also check your hospital's policy on workplace violence and bullying. If your supervisor is in violation of these policies, and you can prove it, go to her higher ups. If no result, consult legal advice. I would also look into reporting her to your state board of Nursing. I am sure they have a policy statement regarding workplace violence and bullying. Good luck to you.
  9. 0
    I think the transfer is your best choice at this time. You have already brought this issue up and have been ignored. I think it is very common for management to have a blind eye re the bullies. They may have worked there before you and got on good terms with higher ups so are able to get away with this. If you have already reported the situation and things have not improved I think it's best to transfer out before the bully succeeds in defaming you. I've been in your shoes and had a bully harass me over jealousy that she was an LPN not an RN. The manager didn't care, in fact she felt sorry for her. She was real good at making people feel sorry for her and getting others on her side and she had been there for years and had lots of friends. But karma is a ***** and she eventually lost her job when they phased out LPNs and had to take a "lesser" job secretary which was very upsetting for her. Frankly I think a secretary is a fine job if only it paid more, but to her it was very insulting. Luckily she left soon after and things started to get better without her provocations.
  10. 2
    You don't "win" against a person who is harassing you by sticking around and subjecting yourself to more abuse, especially without a plan of action to deal with that abusive person.

    Leave. End of story.
    Altra and nrsang97 like this.
  11. 2
    Lateral violence is not passive agression. Lateral violence is bullying against those of your same level. Passive aggression is basically making someone look incompetent and telling them in a million ways to go f themselves without actually saying it.
    Hygiene Queen and psu_213 like this.


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