Do doctors have any idea what we nurses do? lol - page 3

As a pregnant nurse, the 12 hour shift is taking its toll on my body. My doctor looked at me with a straight face and said "can't you just put your feet up for 30 minutes every 3 hours or so?" Um, you have been to the hospital... Read More

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    I don't think most physicians understand the nursing workflow, just like most nurses don't understand the physician workflow.

    I do think most physicians appreciate the patient-asssessment and triage capabilities of nurses.
    KelRN215 likes this.

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    I'll speak up for our ED docs.

    They've got a pretty good sense of what our lives are like and are generally and genuinely respectful and helpful.
    Medic2RN likes this.
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    Quote from AWanderingMinstral
    I think many doctors DO know what we do...and that's why they're doctors. One of my biggest pet peeves is when a doctor asks me why another doctor ordered a particular medication. Um, aren't you a doctor? I'm never sure if it's because he actually thinks I know exactly why a particular medication was ordered or if he (and yes, it's always a male doctor) simply wants to tell me why it was ordered in an attempt to appear superior. I JUST experienced this last night when asked why a patient was ordered (by the orthopedic surgeon) IV vitamin K. I stated that the patient's INR was 2.2 and, on our orthopedics unit, that is why it was ordered. Instead of accepting my response, he rambled on and on and I ultimately told him to "ask [his] MD friend." Ugh.
    To the first bolded, maybe him asking these kinds of questions is his way of making you feel included...

    I see so many posts from nurses who complain that the physicians don't take them seriously or couldn't care less about what they say. Maybe your hospital phyicians do care. Just a thought.

    For the second bolded, I'm curious what he rambled on and on about...was he explaining his concern over the order? If so he may have felt it was a learning experience for you, and thought you were worth the time to educate.

    Of course he could just be bitter, I have no idea. But then again, maybe he isn't.
    ♪♫ in my ♥ likes this.
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    Quote from PRICHARILLAisMISSED
    maybe him asking these kinds of questions is his way of making you feel included...
    I sometimes get docs from the floors asking why our docs did what they did and I generally take it as recognition that our docs often include us in their thinking about *why* they're ordering as they do and not just *what* they're ordering. Sometimes I can answer and sometimes I have to point them in the direction of the ordering provider.

    Either way, it's nice to be included as part of the team and it's helpful to be able to educate the patients and families.
    PRICHARILLAisMISSED likes this.
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    Quote from BostonFNP
    I don't think most physicians understand the nursing workflow, just like most nurses don't understand the physician workflow.

    I do think most physicians appreciate the patient-asssessment and triage capabilities of nurses.
    I do agree with that statement. I feel that is especially true in my current role as a home health nurse... My relationship with MDs feels much different now than it did when I worked in the hospital. I am the eyes and ears in the community.

    For example- one of my patients is on service because there is concern of family non-compliance with his care plan. His caregivers appear to have some cognitive limitations and require very concrete instructions. The patient is fed exclusively through a G-tube. He used to be on overnight feeds of 500 mL and due to slow weight gain, the volume was increased to 600 mL. Despite the increase in feeds, he still was not gaining weight. One morning, I got to his house before his morning bolus feed was started and was able to review the settings on the pump... the family had stopped the overnight feed and believed that it was "done" because the bag had run dry but when I checked the volume, I found that the patient had only received something like 490 mL. The formula cans are 240 mL each and the family did not realize that to give 600 mL, they had to put more than 2 cans in the bag. I am in frequent contact with this patient's physician and when I discussed this with her, she said "I never would have thought to ask that!"
    dirtyhippiegirl likes this.
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    Quote from PRICHARILLAisMISSED

    To the first bolded, maybe him asking these kinds of questions is his way of making you feel included...

    I see so many posts from nurses who complain that the physicians don't take them seriously or couldn't care less about what they say. Maybe your hospital phyicians do care. Just a thought.

    For the second bolded, I'm curious what he rambled on and on about...was he explaining his concern over the order? If so he may have felt it was a learning experience for you, and thought you were worth the time to educate.

    Of course he could just be bitter, I have no idea. But then again, maybe he isn't.
    Anything is possible. The reality is that I'm neither interested in nor do I care about the adverse effects of intravenous vitamin K (not enough to memorize them when I can look them up). I provided the doctor with the probable reason why the patient was receiving it. If it was a matter of administering something else or nothing at all, well, that's between him and the $1 million-earning orthopedic surgeon. I earned a diploma RN, a BSN, and a master's degree in infectious diseases and microbiology. I'm quite capable of attending medical school, but I enjoy having a life.
  7. 0
    No. they. do. not.
    ......and, sorry you are having a hard time with the twelves----
    I cannot IMAGINE how hard running for 12 hours would
    be while pregnant....((( hugs ))) to you!


    "eatmysox"....WOW! That is awesome!!! I have NEVER seen a doctor willing to help like that! I used to work with a nurse practitioner, who LOVED to come out of a room and tell us "ummm......your patient just had a CODE BROWN" and sneer. I felt like they LOVED to tell us that, as if to imply "back when I was a lowly FLOOR nurse like YOU, I would've had to clean them, but now I don't HAVE to!".... (and yes, I realize that's MY interpretation of their sneer and maybe they weren't thinking that at all.....LOL!)
    Last edit by nervousnurse on Mar 25, '13 : Reason: added more info....


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