SOOOOOO excited!

  1. I posted yesterday about concerns re: not having a BSN and being able to work in NICU. That was the info I was getting from my recruiter. I took matters into my own hands today and called the nurse manager of NICU and I'm so glad I did! She told me that they require a BSN for new grads only!! They start a fellowship in October which is, I believe 6 months. So, if I'm hired, I'll get a really great orientation. I can't tell you how relieved I am. I'd been thinking about trauma ICU and the ED, but NICU has been in the back of my mind as well. When I read your postings and what you all loved about it, it just became more and more obvious that NICU will be a great place for me. One thing I love about nursing is developing relationships w/ patients AND families; according to what I've read here there is plenty of that. And I want to be challenged, which I know I will be. I was kind of sick thinking that I wouldn't be considered because I don't have my BSN, and now I am so relieved. I feel that sense of,well, I don't know what exactly, but I've been having a hard time deciding what exactly I want to do; knowing it's time to do something different. Nothing really made me feel easy, like it was meant to be, until I started really looking at NICU.

    I'm sure I'm rambling and making no sense, but I just have such a sense of relief and happiness right now about what path I've chosen, that I wanted to share. And to thank ALL of you for helping me find my way.:kiss

    ParrotheadRN

    Now I have to start reading up on neonates! I have NO idea how to take care of anyone that weighs less than 100lbs!
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  2. 6 Comments

  3. by   EricJRN
    Great news, ParrotHeadRN!
  4. by   BabyRN2Be
    So, is this true for most places? BSN is entry level for NICU for a new grad? Or does it depend on the region?

    Also, I thought that NICU's only went up to a level 3. Now I'm reading about level 4's. Is this new? Is this for hospitals who do ECMO?
  5. by   EricJRN
    Quote from ParrotHeadRN
    Now I have to start reading up on neonates! I have NO idea how to take care of anyone that weighs less than 100lbs!
    I was going to tell you that one of the excellent books for NICU nurses is Handbook of Neonatal Intensive Care by Merenstein and Gardner.
  6. by   EricJRN
    Quote from BabyRN2Be
    So, is this true for most places? BSN is entry level for NICU for a new grad? Or does it depend on the region?

    Also, I thought that NICU's only went up to a level 3. Now I'm reading about level 4's. Is this new? Is this for hospitals who do ECMO?
    The BSN may be required in some places, but certainly not everywhere. As to the NICU 'levels', there is quite a bit of differing opinion. Usually Level IV refers to a large NICU that accepts many transfers and performs ECMO and other highly specialized services.
  7. by   jnette
    Quote from ParrotHeadRN
    I'm sure I'm rambling and making no sense, but I just have such a sense of relief and happiness right now about what path I've chosen, that I wanted to share. And to thank ALL of you for helping me find my way.:kiss

    ParrotheadRN

    Now I have to start reading up on neonates! I have NO idea how to take care of anyone that weighs less than 100lbs!

    Ramble away, Parrothead ! Always refreshing to see someone excited and happy !
    Yay for you !!! So glad your dream is about to materialise !!!
  8. by   BabyRN2Be
    Quote from EricEnfermero
    I was going to tell you that one of the excellent books for NICU nurses is Handbook of Neonatal Intensive Care by Merenstein and Gardner.
    I actually bought that book within the past week. Haven't had time to look at it, but I'm looking forward to it since I've started volunteer work as a "cuddler" in a local NICU. Last week was my first week and I wasn't scared off. Actually, the nurses were very welcoming which was really nice.

    We do feedings, changes, and hold the more stable kiddos (mostly feeder/growers) who are fussing.

    It'll be very interesting and I do like it so far.

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