How can I get a degree in Neonatal care?

  1. 0
    Hello!
    I'm a sophomore in high school and have known for quite a while that I would love to be a neonatal nurse. I know that you have your BSN and also saw on this website ( http://www.allnursingschools.com/nur...onatal-nursing ) that you need to have a neonatal resuscitation. The website only listed a handful of schools that you can get it in and none of them are very close to me. So I was just wondering if you have to go to a school that offers a neonatal degree or take an online class.
    Also if you have any tips for me I would love to hear them!
    Thank you for your help!
    - Sarah
  2. 8 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    Hi Sarah,

    In order to become a neonatal nurse, you need to attend a general nursing program (either an associate's degree or bachelor's program), then seek a job in a neonatal area once you graduate. Don't worry about getting neonatal certification or resuscitation classes. That all happens after you've been a nurse in NICU or well-baby for awhile. Head on over to the pre nursing, or student nursing forums for answers to your questions about nursing school.

    Good luck!

    Stephen
  4. 0
    There really isn't a specific degree for Neonatal nursing. You can work as a neonatal nurse and after a couple of years you can become certified by taking a test. You can, however, get your BSN and continue your education toward Neonatal Nurse Practitioner. That might be a good option for you. The neonatal resuscitation (NRP) can be taken in hospitals. Just go to the websites of hospitals near you and look for their education programs. Hope this helps some. Good Luck to you
  5. 0
    Like they've said above, you can go to any nursing school (make sure it's RN, not LPN) and then when you graduate you can look for a job in the NICU. Check out your local universities and community colleges. Sometimes it's hard to get a job in the NICU straight out of school since it's so specialized, but it's definitely possible and I highly recommend it if you know that you want it.

    Good luck!
  6. 0
    While you are still in high school, make sure you take a lot of college prep science and math. Science and math courses, IMHO, are the best courses for critical thinking and problem solving. I would take more than you think you need.

    You may also be able to volunteer in a hospital in your area. We did have several teenage volunteers in the NICU who were interested in nursing and pre med. They mainly helped the unit clerk and stock the bedsides, but they also got to see a lot and learn a lot while they were there. You may also meet people there who can help you on your journey. Human connections can be extremely influential in one's career. Check with your local hospital under "volunteer services".

    When you are ready to apply to nursing school, AVOID the for profit/online schools. Stick to a nursing program that has been around a long time and has a good reputation. There are many NICU nurses out there who are diploma and associate degree educated and are exceptional nurses, but I tell all young people these days to get their BSN right out of high school because it will give them the most career options.

    Best wishes on your career in nursing,

    Mrs H.
  7. 0
    Quote from SteveNNP
    Hi Sarah,

    In order to become a neonatal nurse, you need to attend a general nursing program (either an associate's degree or bachelor's program), then seek a job in a neonatal area once you graduate. Don't worry about getting neonatal certification or resuscitation classes. That all happens after you've been a nurse in NICU or well-baby for awhile. Head on over to the pre nursing, or student nursing forums for answers to your questions about nursing school.

    Good luck!

    Stephen
    Steve,

    I have my BSN, and am pursuing my MSN. I have only med-surg experience (June 2008-present). How do I find a NICU nursing job? I've been turned down by NICUs just because I have no prior NICU experience. How do I get someone to give me that first NICU experience?
  8. 0
    It is hit and miss with NICU jobs since most places have a low turnover. Does your hospital have a NICU, we take the internal transfers. Have you thought about postpartum to get your feet wet in babyland?
  9. 0
    Hi ALL!I'm currently working in a major teaching hospital as a licensed phlebotomist while I finish my BSN. Im also a licensed EKG tech. I plan to have my nursing license in the next 13 months. I would love to work in NICU but my facility only allows you to apply as a new grad and they offer you mainly med surg positions. My professors have advised me to work at least two years in med surg for experience but I am torn. I spoke with a traveling NICU nurse who advised me not to waste my time in med surg if I know that I want NICU. I plan to apply in a different state for a NICU position but I am unsure how to make my resume stand out from other new grads. Any input is welcome.
  10. 2
    It's generally agreed that working for years in med-surg when you want NICU is a waste of time. Med-surg will teach you practically nothing useful for NICU other than time management, which you can learn in the NICU.
    aes29 and NicuGal like this.


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