University of Rochester Accelerated Nursing Program - ABPNN - page 92

by aalya123

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I just got accepted into U of R's accelerated bachelors nursing program. Just wanted to start a thread to see who else is going there!... Read More


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    i just reread my last post and i realized my question really didnt make any sense. What i meant was do you think it is better to try to rent a house or an apartment or does it really make a difference?
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    Congrats to everyone who has been accepted! I received my admissions packet last week (I'm in California). I can't believe we only have until Feb 3rd to put down the deposit. Anyone know if the check has to be postmarked or received by that date? Or is there a way we can pay through credit card?

    I'm still torn on my decision since $600 is a lot and I'm still waiting to hear back from schools. And Rochester's ABSN program has a hefty price tag, even compared to other expensive programs nearby. Has anyone decided to attend this program and can tell me how they're justifying paying so much for it?
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    I don't think there is much of a difference between renting a whole house or an apartment. Just whatever you can afford and are more comfortable in.
    hippocraticrush likes this.
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    I just graduated in December. Despite the hefty price tag, I was very pleased with the curriculum,faculty and clinical experiences. The program has an excellent reputation. Most of our class already have jobs and passed the NCLEX.
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    I believe the date to return the intent to enroll deposit got pushed back to the 10th. I have accepted my offer and decided to attend because I believe that even though the program is quite expensive, it gets us the BSN degree in only 12 months as opposed to other programs I looked at which ranged from 16 to 22 months. I believe that this shorter duration allows us to graduate and look for jobs sooner than graduates of comparable programs. The school and medical center also have a stellar reputation and are very highly ranked and I think this will also help us gain a leg up on fellow applicants to jobs once we graduate. This is just my opinion, but I hope it helps make your decision a little easier.
    sunny0009 likes this.
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    I've been living in Rochester for the past 2 years (U of R for undergrad).the white coat ghetto. The white coat ghetto neighborhood is almost all houses, I don't know of any apartments that are within walking distance.

    There are multiple houses that are rented out by room to students at Strong, like studenthousingrochester.com. The way renting these houses works pretty much like an apartment - you have your own room and usually your own bathroom - but you have common shared spaces (living room, kitchen, etc).

    Renting only a room lets you skip the stress of finding roommates, worrying about everyone paying bills on time, etc. It's common for the students in these houses to be in a similar program - which can be good or bad - but often you'll see a familiar face. I lived in a house on Crittenden Blvd and it's 100 yards across the street from the hospital, which is a HUGE plus to me. I have my own private bathroom.

    Hope this helps! Let me know if you have any other questions, I was completely overwhelmed when I moved to Rochester from CA and had to figure all this stuff out!
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    Quote from Ukes425
    I believe the date to return the intent to enroll deposit got pushed back to the 10th. I have accepted my offer and decided to attend because I believe that even though the program is quite expensive, it gets us the BSN degree in only 12 months as opposed to other programs I looked at which ranged from 16 to 22 months. I believe that this shorter duration allows us to graduate and look for jobs sooner than graduates of comparable programs. The school and medical center also have a stellar reputation and are very highly ranked and I think this will also help us gain a leg up on fellow applicants to jobs once we graduate. This is just my opinion, but I hope it helps make your decision a little easier.
    Thank you for the response! This will definitely be a hard decision. And yes, I called last week and an admissions person said that the deadline to turn in the deposit has been pushed back to February 10th (postmarked, if anyone is wondering).
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    For everyone considering this program, let me just give you a few warnings before you commit:

    1. This program is EXTREMELY expensive. It is not worth it at all. They seriously take advantage of the students and the tuition and fees amount to nearly $60,000, not including living expenses. On a nurse's salary it would take years to pay that off.

    2. The program is not worth the price. I know NCLEX pass rates are high, but that's because the students that apply are smarter to begin with - it's a self-fullfilling prophecy. The program itself does not do a better job or preparing you for the NCLEX than any other.

    3. Outside of Rochester, the 'reputation' diminishes quite a bit and no one really cares. Sure, if you live in Rochester you're more likely to find a job - but I would recommend against doing that any way. The hospitals in Rochester pay QUITE a bit less than any other major city I've ever lived in. My new grad nurse friends in other cities (with lower cost of living than Rochester) started at around $33-36 an hour. Rochester starts at $24-26 (LPNs make more in some places).

    4. The entire school is extremely poorly run, political, and just not a good environment. This is by far the worst complaint I have. Courses were unorganized, deadlines change constantly, and test content is rarely clear. They treat the students like children - they take attendence in a majority of the classes and take off for not attending. Study better from the book/powerpoint slides than lecture? Too bad! You have to sit through an unhelpful 3 hour lecture 4x a week to avoid losing points! They are also don't understand if you have a life outside of school - weekly schedules are often sporadic and make no sense. Example: They'll have you come in at 8 am for a class that ends at 9am, then your next class not be until noon. Wouldn't it have made more sense to just have to first class at 10 or 11, thus letting us sleep on the few days we don't have clinical? But nope, instead we're made to sit on campus idly for hours everyday wanting to go home due to their horrible scheduling.

    5. Clinicals are poorly run and scheduled as well. You do a lottery system and end up having random hours (Saturday and Sunday nights anyone??) and there is little to no oversight. There were days when many students just sat at the nurse's station idly chatting because we're never told what we can/can't do and we're staggered all over the hospital so that our "clinical instructors" are usually running floor to floor and spend very little time actually directing us.

    6. I just want to mention again how bad the administration is. DO NOT BE FOOLED with how they originally come across - that changes very quickly. They act like they are at your beck and call until they have that deposit and first semester tuition check - then it's all downhill from there. Suddenly they never want to help you in the slightest.

    I'm just trying to warn anyone before they send in those deposits. PLEASE be careful - you do not want to sign a year of your life away to these people for that amount of money.
  9. 0
    Well, everyone is entitled to their own opinion, but I really feel the need to refute some of these points (and my only connection is that I am a proud grad).
    1) the only classes where attendance was required were labs and clinical.
    2) wouldn't it be nice if schedules could be built around each individual's preferences? You've got to schedule the classes when faculty is available - most of them are NP's that do have other office hours to maintain. We always used any downtime to study! Now that there are 3 cohorts a year I'm sure scheduling is still being tweaked.
    3)The lottery system was implemented to make the assignments more fair to everyone. Who is to say my reason for days was more important than yours? As for there being no supervision I just find that unbelievable. The only unit where that was necessary was OB. In that case the units were all on the same floor. If you were sitting chatting at the nurses station, shame on you! Take some initiative: ask to observe procedures, ask how you can help out, ask to take vitals...anything. As an adult learner you really shouldn't have to be led around by the hand. I found the clinical instructors to be professional and very hands on.
  10. 0
    You have your opinion and I have mine. Having gone through the program myself, I can tell you my experience, perhaps yours was different. Many of lecture classes now include an attendance sheet and they do take attendance.


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