Need help for school choice

  1. 0
    Hello everyone,

    I was currently admitted by three nursing programs: two 12-month accelerated-BSN (University of Rochester and Edgewood college in Madison, Wisconsin), and the other one is a three-year direct-entry MSN program on Family Nurse practitioner track. I am kind of confused of which one to choice. I personally really like the direct-entry MSN program which will save me some time since I am already in my late 20s. Eventually I want to go for the NP program for sure. But I wonder how competitive a fresh grad of Nurse practitioner without any experience will be. It sounds like in most cases that direct-entry NP grads are treated unequally for lacking of experience. And this program comes with a hefty price tag. And it's a huge commitment in time as well. I don't want to spend three years in school coming out with heavy-loaded student loans but not be able to find a job. University of Rochester's BSN is not cheaper either but as least its only one year. Do you know how are their grads doing on the job market? Is it worth to trade one or two years with finishing accelerated BSN first and land a job first to work for a year or two and then go for NP program? Need some advice. Your insight is very much appreciated.
  2. 5 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    Can someone help? Need some insights badly!
  4. 0
    I'm not in New York, nor an NP, either...I just wanted to respond, and at least give you a chance for feedback.

    It depends on which route you want to go...BSN or NP???

    As for the BSN: Right now, the new grad nurse status is overwhelming, especially in the East. Be prepared to look for a job for several months, at least a year. However, if you can relocate, are willing to start your nursing career anywhere, specialty wise and state wise, go for the lower $$$ debt and go into the BSN program.

    As fir the NP: can't answer that question...see if you can do a search through the NP forums here...see if you can ask posters and they can be more helpful in assisting you with the experience of coming out of NP school without experience.
  5. 0
    hello LadyFree28,
    Thanks for your response. Really appreciate it. I see. I know the market is tough for new grads and I am willing to relocate upon graduation. The smaller college is definitely with a lower price tag and there are only two nursing programs in the area. Because of this, there seems to be more new-grads friendly since the pool is smaller. But I want to go for NP eventually, I guess that UR may lay a better foundation for me since its a nationally renowned program? That is why I am stumbled by these and would like to hearyour voices.
  6. 0
    I know a direct entry MSN program is tempting, but two things to keep in mind: 1.) do you think you might be a bit overwhelmed to be an NP without ever working as a nurse? (Also, I've heard of some programs requiring you to work as an RN by the time you start NP clinicals.) and 2.) what if you fall in love with ED/NICU/teaching/management and realize FNP might not be the best choice for you?
    I worked for two years as an RN because I wanted to make sure I REALLY knew if I wanted to be an NP and in which speciality and now I a confident in my decision to go back to school. Of course there are no guarantees in whatever you choose and anything is a gamble! Just some food for thought.

    As for wanting to save time....it honestly goes by so fast. I remember sitting in microbiology class when I was 19 feeling like I'd never graduate. Now I'm halfway done with my doctorate!
  7. 0
    MSN program! Definitely! Good luck!


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