Is neuro that bad?

  1. Maybe it's just the facility I am going to, but some experienced nurses said that the neuro progressive care unit that I am going to might be overwhelming for a new grad like me. Some have even said negative things about neuro.

    I know eveyone is different and as a new grad, I am up for the challenge!

    I am just concerned, why do some nurses say this about neuro? What can I expect?

    I start in a month. How can I prepare so I can do better and be have extra preparation.

    Thank you!
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  2. 8 Comments

  3. by   saxuhmuhphone
    I'm a new grad that started on a Neurology Unit. Every staff member on that unit told me "Once you can do Neuro, you can do anything". And I believe that is true because any Neuro unit is HARD. It can be very emotionally and physically exhausting for many, many reasons. When you have 4 patients, 3 are total cares, all are feeders, half need meds crushed, one's on a tube feeding, 3 are on bed alarms, all are q2hr turns, 1 is on restraints, 2 are actively always trying to get out of bed, 1 has diarrhea and has poop everywhere, 1 is yelling, none are oriented... It certainly has improved my time management like crazy. You are constantly sprinting for bed alarms, and you cry with happiness when you have an AAOx4, ambulatory, independent patient. My unit floats nurses sometimes and cardiac units feel like a vacation when 3 out of 4 of your patients are AAOx4. Neuro patients are also complicated. Not all disorientation is caused by the brain - you'll see septic encephalopathy, drug/alcohol overdose, renal encephalopathy, hepatic encephalopathy, cardiac dysrhythmias causing neuro deficits, etc. And everyone has extensive medical history.

    It honestly has been an amazing place to learn. I feel like I could go anywhere. But I can't say its been easy. Be a team player right off the bat and always step up to help your co-workers. That way you'll have a great team behind you, and your co-workers will actually want to help you when you have to spend 25 minutes scraping the poop out from underneath a patient's fingernails for the 2nd time in a shift.
  4. by   Stephia87RN
    I started on a Neuro unit as a new grad and loved it! We're a nationally certified stoke center so that's the majority of our patients. They can be difficult because many stoke patients have impaired mobility, but having a patient come in completely down on one side and then a week later being able to walk again is one of the most rewarding parts of my job. We do get some difficult TBI patients, but you learn how to care for them with time. Good luck!
  5. by   jouRNey8
    Sounds tough. I am a new grad and received an offer for days on a neuro floor at a stroke center hospital. It sounds overwhelming and I am a little nervous about accepting. I also have an offer for a general surgery floor (at a not so great hospital.) Not quite sure which to take.

    Will I get stuck in neuro if I hate it? Neuro sounds like a good challenge and rewarding at times but in my mind it's psych+nursing home pts.

    ...is neuro that bad?
  6. by   AZRNallday
    You are the same with me! I had another offer at a different hospital, but I stayed with this one. If you don't mind me asking, what state is that hospital in? I am just starting!
  7. by   jouRNey8
    I'm in NY. Are you working in neuro now? How is it, honestly?
  8. by   AZRNallday
    I am a new grad, so I am just starting out with orientation and classes. I have toured the unit and I like it. Managers say it can be an overflow of any types of patients really. Since pts neuro status can change from anything. Some stroke, some tele and a mix of everything. That will depend in your hospital too. I am not in NY. I will do my first long day this Friday and I will let you know! Honestly, you dont have to be stuck in neuro. It might even open doors to you in the future. I had to choose between 2 offers too! It is hard deciding. Look at your goals, where you fit better and where you think is more exciting. Even though a floor might be hard, it is always a great experience.
  9. by   JEStewart
    What are everyone's thoughts on starting in neuro vs cardiac ICUs as a starting point to get to CRNA school? I know it's totally different, but I have worked in the veterinary field for the last 9 years, 4 of which were in neuro. I loved it. I expect human neuro to be completely different, but my current long term goal is to go into the CRNA path. I've read a lot about experience prior to school for that, and most people recommend cardiac ICU. I've considered neuro as another option if I change my mind about CRNA school. Any thoughts or suggestions for a soon to be nursing student? There's a long path ahead either way, but I love learning and these areas are the most interesting by far.
  10. by   MurseJJ
    Quote from JEStewart
    What are everyone's thoughts on starting in neuro vs cardiac ICUs as a starting point to get to CRNA school? I know it's totally different, but I have worked in the veterinary field for the last 9 years, 4 of which were in neuro. I loved it. I expect human neuro to be completely different, but my current long term goal is to go into the CRNA path. I've read a lot about experience prior to school for that, and most people recommend cardiac ICU. I've considered neuro as another option if I change my mind about CRNA school. Any thoughts or suggestions for a soon to be nursing student? There's a long path ahead either way, but I love learning and these areas are the most interesting by far.
    Many of our RNs from our neuroscience ICU are accepted to CRNA school, along with the rest of the ICUs. Shouldn't be a problem. Just make sure you apply to schools that accept neuro ICU experience (there may be a handful that don't, or express preference for SICU or CVICU).

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