Leaving critical care

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    After graduating from NS, I went directly to neuro trauma ICU. I've spent the last 10 months there. Today my transfer request came through for a general medical floor. It's been a difficult 10 months. I never did find a comfort zone. When others around me would get excited about the gunshot wound admission that was about to come, or some other level 1 trauma, I would get overcome with dread. I'd all but freeze with the level 1's when they came in. Once the pt. stabilized, I'd be ok. Even then, I hate road trips and am not fond of bedside procedures. It just never came together for me. I think I always knew I didn't belong there.

    I feel relieved and am recovering some of that sense of excitement about my career that I had when I graduated. New possiblities. The unit I'm going to looks like a good choice, where I can gain some confidence in the basics. The problem is that I've still got to work on my ICU till I'm released to my new unit. There will be gossip, and whispers. Everyone will have an opinion. Ugh! Anyway, It's been nice stopping by this forum. I've learned lots. Good luck to you all!
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    Good luck! and don't EVER let anyone make you feel you have settled for "second best" truly you have a better chance of going into other nursing fields - in some ways ICU can be a dead end - unless you want to be a CRNA.

    Don't get me wrong - I do like ICU but there are days when I look around and think "I would like a 9-5 job, say as a community nurse" and I look around and realise that I know zip about just normal care. You know when you have been in ICU too long when you walk into a ward and say "none of these patients have more than one drip - thay can all go home":chuckle

    ICU is not the be all and end all.
    Last edit by gwenith on Nov 8, '06
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    everyone finds their niche, that's part of the reason that nursing is so wonderful. you find what works for you and what doesn't work for you will work for someone else. find what you love and love what you find. be the best nurse you can be regardless of the unit you are working.
  6. 0
    Quote from gwenith
    - in some ways ICU can be a dead end - unless you want to be a CRNA.
    Bite your tongue! I disagree with this statement to no end..and have a thousand reasons why it's wrong. And BTW, why would 'ICU' be any more of a 'dead-end' than any other unit (M/S, ER, ortho, etc.)?

    Some people THRIVE on the challenge(and adrenalin) of caring for the sickest of the sick. Perhaps it's just not your forte? grrrrr....:uhoh21:
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    Quote from Dinith88
    Bite your tongue! I disagree with this statement to no end..and have a thousand reasons why it's wrong. And BTW, why would 'ICU' be any more of a 'dead-end' than any other unit (M/S, ER, ortho, etc.)?

    Some people THRIVE on the challenge(and adrenalin) of caring for the sickest of the sick. Perhaps it's just not your forte? grrrrr....:uhoh21:
    I knew there would be those that disagreed with me - that is fine but don't forget I am posting from Australia not America. You may have different opportunities over there than we have here.

    I did not say that caring for critically ill patients was not rewarding - after all I have been in the ICU field for over 25 years either hands on or teaching. Just that there are other opportunities for those who work in other areas. All too often here I see the attitude of ICU is the pinnacle of nursing and anyone working in another field is settling for second best. Yet I know that had I gone into say, gerontology or rehab and put into THAT what I have put into ICU, well today I would probably running a facility getting 2-3 times my current income.
  8. 0
    Quote from RNKittyKat
    After graduating from NS, I went directly to neuro trauma ICU. I've spent the last 10 months there. Today my transfer request came through for a general medical floor. It's been a difficult 10 months. I never did find a comfort zone. When others around me would get excited about the gunshot wound admission that was about to come, or some other level 1 trauma, I would get overcome with dread. I'd all but freeze with the level 1's when they came in. Once the pt. stabilized, I'd be ok. Even then, I hate road trips and am not fond of bedside procedures. It just never came together for me. I think I always knew I didn't belong there.

    I feel relieved and am recovering some of that sense of excitement about my career that I had when I graduated. New possiblities. The unit I'm going to looks like a good choice, where I can gain some confidence in the basics. The problem is that I've still got to work on my ICU till I'm released to my new unit. There will be gossip, and whispers. Everyone will have an opinion. Ugh! Anyway, It's been nice stopping by this forum. I've learned lots. Good luck to you all!
    Good luck to you. I'm sorry that ICU didn't work out for you, but this has probably helped to cement your ideas that your new unit will work out better. ICU is difficult and can be a huge transition to make from nursing school. Some people thrive on the pace, others don't quite fit. It is NOT a sign of failure that you are leaving. It is a good sign that you can adequately assess your needs at this point in your career.

    You will probably find that your ICU experience gives you a great preparation for other nursing, because of all the extra experience you've had in assessment.

    One of the wonderful aspects of nursing is that we *can* change relatively easily. There's always a transition period, and extra education, but we truly have so many doors open to us!
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    Quote from gwenith
    I knew there would be those that disagreed with me - that is fine but don't forget I am posting from Australia not America. You may have different opportunities over there than we have here.

    I did not say that caring for critically ill patients was not rewarding - after all I have been in the ICU field for over 25 years either hands on or teaching. Just that there are other opportunities for those who work in other areas. All too often here I see the attitude of ICU is the pinnacle of nursing and anyone working in another field is settling for second best. Yet I know that had I gone into say, gerontology or rehab and put into THAT what I have put into ICU, well today I would probably running a facility getting 2-3 times my current income.
    OK i understand. I think it just depends on how people define 'success', 'failure', 'dead-end', etc.


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