I need some advice

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    I graduated with my BSN in 2010, so I am technically still a new nurse. I have a little over 2 years experience with neurology/neurosurgical/medical surgical patients. It has always been my goal to become an ICU nurse. I want the exposure to everything, so I can be the best all-around nurse I can be. I have been at Emory University Hospital as a neurosurgery floor nurse, but I have recently landed a job interview in Emory's neuro ICU. I am ecstatic but nervous! I love the people I work with now, and I'm content with my job. EVERYTHING about ICU scares me, so I'm starting to have my doubts about transitioning to ICU. I didn't expect to get called for an interview so soon, especially since I have no ICU experience. I'm wondering if I should just go for it or stick it out as a floor nurse a few more years. I feel like this is the opportunity of a lifetime. It's hard for a new nurse to get ICU experience, especially experience in neuro ICU at Emory. I'm just really doubting myself and need some advice!
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  3. 4 Comments so far...

  4. 1
    If the unit seems like a good fit for you and ICU is your dream, I say go for it! You have a good neuro foundation, which will help you somewhat. Many experienced ICU nurses started off in Med-surg. Take the job if you are offered it
    kjo1127 likes this.
  5. 1
    Go for it. You will get a long orientation and critical care classes. I learned a ton working in a neuro ICU in Detroit. Your neuro background will only help you.
    Last edit by nrsang97 on Dec 21, '12 : Reason: added
    kjo1127 likes this.
  6. 1
    Totally go for it!!! If its your dream, sounds like your door has just opened!
    kjo1127 likes this.
  7. 0
    Absolutely go for it. You're feeling nervous because you are stepping out of your comfort zone (which happens to everyone!) I was in the same position at one point in my career and felt exactly the same way. But I did it. And, as mentioned by nrsang97, I received the appropriate orientation and supervision to succeed in the ICU. You will, too!


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