St. Kate's Post-Bacc Program - page 2

Hi- I was wondering if anyone is participating or has particpated in St. Kate's post-bacc BSN evening/weekend program? I am going to apply for next year's program and would like to hear what... Read More

  1. by   maxxineo
    oh yes...and our pass rate for post-bac was 100 last year, and so far it's 100 as well....
  2. by   Toots71506
    Maxxineo - Thanks so much for the info! I talked to one of the advisors there and she said that next year they're planning on transforming the post-bacc into a master's level program. I have a few more questions that I'm hoping you can answer...

    1 - Did most of the students have families? I have children and that's my biggest reason why I'm waiting because I'm afraid I'll be too busy with course stuff to spend time with them.
    2 - Was there tons of studying to do outside of class?
    3 - Was it really competitive to get in? I have a 3.75 but I'm not sure if I'll be competing with 4.0's.
    4 - Do you know of the average cost to complete the program?

    Thanks for all your feedback!
  3. by   littleneoRN
    Hi! I did not attend St. Kate's, nor do I know much about thier Accelerated program. But I did go through an accelerated program. Here are some things I would think about.

    1. There is no way that any program can teach nursing students what you need to learn in 2 years (4 semesters) without taking a very significant commitment of your time. Working full time, in my mind, would have been very difficult. But I don't mean that to be discouraging. Realistically it will be difficult, but it will be worth it.
    2. Clinical time is extremely important. If, in order to make it less of a time burden, they have less clinical time than other programs, it puts a student at a significant disadvantage in clinical learning, being prepared for the NCLEX, and getting the job of your choice when you're done.
    3. I don't know about Metro State, but I know that the U's Masters program for RN and for MSU-Mankato's program are truly 4 semesters, one of those semesters is just summer. So all three are the same length in reality. So if they are much more intense than St. Kate's, I would wonder why?
  4. by   maxxineo
    Quote from Toots71506
    Maxxineo - Thanks so much for the info! I talked to one of the advisors there and she said that next year they're planning on transforming the post-bacc into a master's level program. I have a few more questions that I'm hoping you can answer...

    1 - Did most of the students have families? I have children and that's my biggest reason why I'm waiting because I'm afraid I'll be too busy with course stuff to spend time with them.
    2 - Was there tons of studying to do outside of class?
    3 - Was it really competitive to get in? I have a 3.75 but I'm not sure if I'll be competing with 4.0's.
    4 - Do you know of the average cost to complete the program?

    Thanks for all your feedback!
    1. Heck yes....there was a baby factory in my class..MANY people had families and/or part-time and full time jobs.
    2. Sometimes yes....lots of studying, it was a lot of work, definitely, especially when you have clinicals and such to do.
    3. When I was accepted....the class size was 24 and 150 or so people applied. I had a degree in bio... Your GPA is great :-)
    4. Yeah, st kates isn't cheap...depends on how many pre-req's you need...with 2 years of nursing, and 3 pre-req classed, I'd say I added at least 20K.

    I'd also recommend looking into the master's bridging program....makes a lot of sense...as far as the clinicals...no one outside my program has a right to say how it is because they weren't in class.....SO....Yes, we don't do as many clinicals as 2 year RN's or traditional students...we did a good amount of med-surg, couple OB, couple mental health, good amounts of public health stuff. Also we mentored in an area of interest...hopefully they will take that apart and give more time to other areas of the hospital like surgery, ICU, etc. You can definitely get enough clinical time in....they don't let us go out unprepared!

    Holla
  5. by   littleneoRN
    I'm not intending to knock St. Kate's because like I said, I don't know much about it. I'm just thinking about the things I know are important in nursing school, and suggesting those as questions to raise as you compare various programs.

    For clinicals, here is what I had for an idea. This varies widely from program to program.
    160 hours in nursing home setting (2 different sites--focus on both basic nursing skills and geriatric care)
    240 hours in med/surg setting (2 different sites/units)
    90 hours mental health
    90 hours community health
    120 hours OB
    120 hours peds
    120 hours with a preceptor in a specialty of your choice

    Clinicals are also valuable as you evaluate what you might want to do as you graduate. It's great to get a real life feel for areas you think you're interested in, and areas you didn't think you were interested in might grab your attention. However much clinical time you do end up getting, take advantage of it. I made it a little higher priority than work for classroom classes. Ask questions. Look for opportunities to see and try new things.

    Good luck in your search!
  6. by   maxxineo
    wow seriously? That's a lot! There's no way that would fit a post-bac program...would be nice, but honestly, it's not necessarily needed. It's great to get the experience before deciding what areas to go into and so you are "prepared" before starting work.....definitely, but with many hospitals in the metro offering 3 month preceptorships, the clinicals and school work done while in school is sufficient. You can always be a student nurse and "get experience" of course, but you don't get a real feel for it until you really start working as a nurse with a colleague and not just a clinical instructor. Also, this brings to light the importance of students to get jobs as hucks or nursing assistants so that students can be immersed in the nursing culture....if they're not doing clinicals, they are at least experiencing some form of nursing and getting real points of view.
  7. by   Toots71506
    Thanks for your feedback Maxxineo! I really appreciate it. I really think the St. Kate's evening and weekend post-bacc or masters would be the way for me to go and that is why I'm strongly leaning on applying there. One other thing, awhile back I posted a question on here about BSN vs. MSN and I received a lot of response saying that getting a masters before having any nursing experience makes no sense. My thought is that if these schools are now changing from BSN to MSN there must be a reason and a need...do you have any thoughts on this?
  8. by   littleneoRN
    Those clinicals I described were all in a 16 month second degree BSN program for people who already had other degrees and were seeking to be nurses. So the same as St. Kate's program except that the degree you get at the end is a BSN. The St. Kate's program is credit toward a master's correct? There advantages and disadvantages to both. One thing I know is that two of my interviews for positions, I got several questions about my program being a second degree program and wanting to know if I had the same amount of classes, work, and clinicals as a traditional student. This seemed important to these two managers, but then at my other two interviews it was never brought it. So, type of degree, amount of clinicals etc., may be important to some managers but not others. I definitely agree with max that your true learning and experience comes when you start working. So you need to do what works best for you.
  9. by   maxxineo
    My opinion is that since the post bac program is for students who already have their bachelors degree and are pursuing a degree in nursing, the big deal is that getting a masters degree requires really the same amount of work given to get the BSN in the post-bac program adding maybe one or two classes. Granted, I haven't researched much into the MSN world, I only just finished passing my NCLEX, but had I had the choice...I would have picked getting the MSN....it simply LOOKS better and will give you more money...are new grad MSN nurses any better than the BSN nurses in skills....heck no, i agree with that...but for convenience, money, and hassle sake, do the MSN program if able. I can't tell you how loud the groan was in my class when we found out that our program may get changed to a Masters program or that a new bridging program may get started....we have to apply again when we could have just taken one or two classes...
  10. by   Toots71506
    Hi Maxxineo - One quick question for you. You mentioned that there was a lot of work outside of class and I'm wondering what kind of work that was...is it papers, memorizing medicines, preparing for speeches, etc. Or, a little of everything?
  11. by   Bennie44
    Maxxineo-

    I am so glad that you posted! Toots and I have been wondering about the St. Kate's program for a while now!

    Sorry to throw a lot of questions at you and I would appreciate anything you have to offer! I applied for the Post-Bacc program for Fall '08.

    1. do you have any idea of the emphasis of acceptance? GPA? Pre-Req's? Essays? Work/Life experience? I graduated with a 3.3 GPA but know that going back to school as an adult would be a totally different deal. I hope my GPA isn't too low.

    2. I have a 4 year old and twins that are 10 months. Before anyone says I am crazy, I have a great husband, mother and mother-in -law to help. How much (on average) study time did you need each day?

    3. I would also need to work, but thinking of going part time to be done by noon each day. Would I HAVE to do that to make it manageable? Or did others seem to make it work?

    4. I have been out of school for 8 years. Was it hard for you to go back? How long were you out of school?

    5. What was the age range of your classmates? I am 33 and feel ancient compared to "newbies".

    any insight would be great and, again, sorry for all the questions, I am just so excited to hear from someone who has been though the program!
  12. by   Bennie44
    Bump....anyone?
  13. by   shellski75
    Hi! I am in the program right now, I graduate in December, and I thought I might answer some questions the best I could.

    I started my pre-req's at St. Kate's in the fall of '05 with two children and had my third baby in Feb. '06. I think at present count there will be 10 babies born to our class of 21.

    1. do you have any idea of the emphasis of acceptance? GPA? Pre-Req's? Essays? Work/Life experience? I graduated with a 3.3 GPA but know that going back to school as an adult would be a totally different deal. I hope my GPA isn't too low.

    I believe they go by pre-req's and GPA but I don't think it hurts to have life experience.

    2. I have a 4 year old and twins that are 10 months. Before anyone says I am crazy, I have a great husband, mother and mother-in -law to help. How much (on average) study time did you need each day?

    I think it depends. I tried to do at least an hour or so a day, just to keep up with it all. Even if something isn't due for a while I would still work on it. It would be really hard to be a procrastinator in this program.

    3. I would also need to work, but thinking of going part time to be done by noon each day. Would I HAVE to do that to make it manageable? Or did others seem to make it work?

    Some have full-time jobs, some part-time and some are stay-at-home moms. I work 0.5 FTE now and it is manageable with three kids.

    4. I have been out of school for 8 years. Was it hard for you to go back? How long were you out of school?

    It was not to hard to get back in the groove. It was nice to do the pre-req's first to ease into it.

    5. What was the age range of your classmates? I am 33 and feel ancient compared to "newbies".

    I am 33 too and probably most everyone else is within 5 years of that.

    There is not as much clinical time as other programs, that is true. But you could have a ton of clinical time and still be a dolt. If you go to clinicals and your mentorship and seek out new experiences and make sure that you are pushing yourself, you are going to be fine. I agree 100% with what Maxxineo has posted and she has a great point about getting experience as a HUC or a NA. It's a great way to see what nursing is about, you get experience and often it's an in as an RN if you wish to stay on the unit you are working on.

    It is really hard and you will probably have moments in which you think it is impossible (especially with kids) but it is worth it.

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