Baker College - page 3

by Phil313 | 5,163 Views | 28 Comments

Hello, Does anyone know where I can find the prerequisites for Baker College. Thanks.... Read More


  1. 0
    I am so sorry for bringing this up. You guys should be able to have a conversation about your school without me horning in with questions about accreditation.
  2. 0
    Quote from Anoetos
    I am so sorry for bringing this up. You guys should be able to have a conversation about your school without me horning in with questions about accreditation.
    It's a common subject that comes up about Baker, so this thread just supplies more info about the school. People have to decide for themselves how much that will influence their decision. It wasn't key for me, but it may be for someone else. You asked about it, and there is nothing wrong with that. The OP may appreciate knowing a little more.
  3. 0
    Quote from Anoetos
    I am so sorry for bringing this up. You guys should be able to have a conversation about your school without me horning in with questions about accreditation.
    There's no need to apologize you probably had no idea what you were getting yourself into by asking.
    And mrsrlg is right, maybe the OP hasn't heard any of this before.
  4. 0
    I appreciated everyone's in put in this discussion that I started. Forums like this is really a great way to gather and share information. Thank you, I don't believe anyone should be offended by anything said, these forums give us a voice that we otherwise would not have. Nursing is hard work and as a Nurse I can tell you support of fellow nurses and other students is a pleasure to have.

    Accreditation is a factor for me to consider as narrow down my search of nursing schools. But, my reality is....the demand is so high for the nursing student....and because schools have limited seats, I most likely will attend the best program that will except me. I have heard good and bad of all the area nursing programs, I believe no program is perfect.

    As far as employment goes, I work for the VA (Veteran Hospital) a Federal Government Facility and plan on retiring there as a RN. I have double checked with recruitment and the VA only requires a Nursing License and Graduation from a State Approved program, which I already knew because I graduated as an LPN from a
    non-accredited state approved program from another state. As far as moving out of Michigan, the VA also does not require you to obtain licenses from state to state. You can work at any VA Facility in the US, as long as you hold a licensed from in any state in the US territory. I currently work in Michigan and do not have a Michigan License.


    I revisited the Baker's LPN-RN program at AH, it doesn't seem like much of "Bridge" program and I noticed it requires more credits then the regular ADN program. (Not sure what that is all about) ? Maybe someone here has more details about it and it's benefit.

    Could someone explain to me Quarters vs Semesters? Someone in this discussion expressed that she preferred quarters vs semesters.
    Last edit by Phil313 on Jul 26, '10
  5. 0
    Quote from nursestyle1
    I appreciated everyone's in put in this discussion that I started. Forums like this is really a great way to gather and share information. Thank you, I don't believe anyone should be offended by anything said, these forums give us a voice that we otherwise would not have. Nursing is hard work and as a Nurse I can tell you support of fellow nurses and other students is a pleasure to have.

    Accreditation is a factor for me to consider as narrow down my search of nursing schools. But, my reality is....the demand is so high for the nursing student....and because schools have limited seats, I most likely will attend the best program that will except me. I have heard good and bad of all the area nursing programs, I believe no program is perfect.

    As far as employment goes, I work for the VA (Veteran Hospital) a Federal Government Facility and plan on retiring there as a RN. I have double checked with recruitment and the VA only requires a Nursing License and Graduation from a State Approved program, which I already knew because I graduated as an LPN from a
    non-accredited state approved program from another state. As far as moving out of Michigan, the VA also does not require you to obtain licenses from state to state. You can work at any VA Facility in the US, as long as you hold a licensed from in any state in the US territory. I currently work in Michigan and do not have a Michigan License.


    I revisited the Baker's LPN-RN program at AH, it doesn't seem like much of "Bridge" program and I noticed it requires more credits then the regular ADN program. (Not sure what that is all about) ? Maybe someone here has more details about it and it's benefit.

    Could someone explain to me Quarters vs Semesters? Someone in this discussion expressed that she preferred quarters vs semesters.
    Nursestyle1,

    The LPN-RN is 3 quarters long, basically about 9 months, but there are pre-reqs needed before applying. It is likely more credits than a usual ADN program because it works with the existing AH LPN program. Including pre-reqs, the LPN program is 1.5 years (actually almost an associate's credit-wise) in itself, so when one graduates with their ADN they basically have about 2.5 years of schooling (inc. pre-reqs), whereas the straight ADN, I believe, is 2 years. However, it is not restricted to just those in the LPN program, but all must take the pre-reqs. I'm not sure if that helps, but I hope so .

    Baker College uses the quarter system, where classes are compressed into 10 weeks. It has the same course content as the longer semester, but is compressed time-wise. The lecture classes are usually 4 credit hours/5 for some science classes. When going through an intensive program, like any nursing, it puts more pressure on because there is more to learn in a shorter time, but we get breaks between classes, e.g., we had 4 weeks off at Christmas, 2 weeks off between Winter and Spring quarters, etc. That break is very much appreciated, and I cannot imagine myself ever going back to a traditional semester program now, but that's just me.

    Anyhow, class calls, but good luck in making your decision.
  6. 0
    Quote from mrsrlg
    Nursestyle1,

    The LPN-RN is 3 quarters long, basically about 9 months, but there are pre-reqs needed before applying. It is likely more credits than a usual ADN program because it works with the existing AH LPN program. Including pre-reqs, the LPN program is 1.5 years (actually almost an associate's credit-wise) in itself, so when one graduates with their ADN they basically have about 2.5 years of schooling (inc. pre-reqs), whereas the straight ADN, I believe, is 2 years. However, it is not restricted to just those in the LPN program, but all must take the pre-reqs. I'm not sure if that helps, but I hope so .

    Baker College uses the quarter system, where classes are compressed into 10 weeks. It has the same course content as the longer semester, but is compressed time-wise. The lecture classes are usually 4 credit hours/5 for some science classes. When going through an intensive program, like any nursing, it puts more pressure on because there is more to learn in a shorter time, but we get breaks between classes, e.g., we had 4 weeks off at Christmas, 2 weeks off between Winter and Spring quarters, etc. That break is very much appreciated, and I cannot imagine myself ever going back to a traditional semester program now, but that's just me.

    Anyhow, class calls, but good luck in making your decision.
    Sorry, wasn't thinking...as a current LPN, it is definitely in your favor to look at the bridge programs available. Baker has one, but there are others - I think OCC and maybe HFCC. Doing it this way, you may be saving yourself a year of school. You may just need to take a few credits of pre-reqs (or 1 quarter or semester) and enter the bridge program, whereas with the ADN you're starting all over and it may be 2+ years or more, so it might save you a year of school. I would definitely talk to some advisors at those schools you're interested in. Again, good luck!
  7. 0
    Yes, It helped a lot. I will look into all the LPN-RN programs available. I have 60 college gen. ed credits.
    It will ball-down to me staying at OU and continue toward the BSN....or......finding a LPN-RN bridge program.

    Best wishes in your studies....
  8. 0
    Quote from nursestyle1
    Yes, It helped a lot. I will look into all the LPN-RN programs available. I have 60 college gen. ed credits.
    It will ball-down to me staying at OU and continue toward the BSN....or......finding a LPN-RN bridge program.

    Best wishes in your studies....
    Great! Once you know all your options, it will make the decision that works for you easier to make, with your current schedule, cost, classes needed, etc. I chose the program and school I did out of convenience, but it really has worked out for the best for me and no regrets at all. For all of us, it is fortunate that at least we have a few options out there.
  9. 0
    Quote from nursestyle1
    I appreciated everyone's in put in this discussion that I started. Forums like this is really a great way to gather and share information. Thank you, I don't believe anyone should be offended by anything said, these forums give us a voice that we otherwise would not have. Nursing is hard work and as a Nurse I can tell you support of fellow nurses and other students is a pleasure to have.

    Accreditation is a factor for me to consider as narrow down my search of nursing schools. But, my reality is....the demand is so high for the nursing student....and because schools have limited seats, I most likely will attend the best program that will except me. I have heard good and bad of all the area nursing programs, I believe no program is perfect.

    As far as employment goes, I work for the VA (Veteran Hospital) a Federal Government Facility and plan on retiring there as a RN. I have double checked with recruitment and the VA only requires a Nursing License and Graduation from a State Approved program, which I already knew because I graduated as an LPN from a
    non-accredited state approved program from another state. As far as moving out of Michigan, the VA also does not require you to obtain licenses from state to state. You can work at any VA Facility in the US, as long as you hold a licensed from in any state in the US territory. I currently work in Michigan and do not have a Michigan License.


    I revisited the Baker's LPN-RN program at AH, it doesn't seem like much of "Bridge" program and I noticed it requires more credits then the regular ADN program. (Not sure what that is all about) ? Maybe someone here has more details about it and it's benefit.

    Could someone explain to me Quarters vs Semesters? Someone in this discussion expressed that she preferred quarters vs semesters.
    How hard is it to get into their LPN-RN program? Can you complete it online?


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