ADN or BSN?

  1. 0 i am currently going to occ for my adn. i'm still doing the pre-req's but, my question is this....

    i have heard alot with regard to adn and bsn. i know i can get my adn and then get a job (sometimes it can get difficult in this market, i'm aware of that), or i can just go for my bsn. i guess i'm torn.

    ==>is it faster to get your adn, get a job and then go back for you bsn

    -or-

    ==>would it be faster/easier to just go for the bsn right away?

    ==> do bsn's make more money?

    i'm 42 and have a steady job that pays pretty well. i don't want to spend the rest of my days in college and i know that i am not a spring chicken any more...lol. i would be in the position in about a year, (if i went the adn route) to quit my job and just use the money from my student loans/saved money, to get through the actual nursing program/clinicals, etc. if i went to bsn route, i would have longer to save money....

    any advise that anyone can give me would be great!!
  2. Visit  Kimberly6891 profile page

    About Kimberly6891

    From 'Southfield, MI'; Joined Mar '11; Posts: 12.

    27 Comments so far...

  3. Visit  JP2011 profile page
    0
    At DMC Bachelors nurses vs adn nurses make basically the same pay from what I heard. I've heard its like a .10 difference at the most. They usually pay based on years nursing experience. It's up to you how you want to get your degree. I'm doing ADN first for the reduced cost. I'm not really worried about not finding a job. ADN is two years after acceptance and BSN is three years after acceptance. I think that is just a personal choice. If I could have gotten right into a bachelors program I would have but couldn't due to cost.
  4. Visit  OB-nurse2013 profile page
    0
    My BSN program is two years, so not all are 3. I chose that route for several reasons, including:making yself more marketable, including wait-listing at most cc BSN for me was actually faster, and the University I'm at has a completely different mentality then where I had been attending. All these reasons were very relative and individual to my situation so I think it is whatever is the best fit for you. Good Luck!!!!
  5. Visit  Kimberly6891 profile page
    0
    I did see other posts that asked the same question that I did....sorry for the repeat, but thank you gals for the advise. I think I'm going to just go the ADN route for now, but I MIGHT change my mind. LOL..

    Thanks again
  6. Visit  LauJen profile page
    0
    I wish I had gone the BSN route from the start. Im in MCC's ADN program, and I didn't make it in the first time around. So, once I'm done, it will have taken me 4 1/2 years to complete the 2 year program (pre-reqs included). You have to do whatever is best for you, but now looking back, I wish I had just jumped into the BSN route, because the ADN isn't as quick as they make you think it is (its not JUST 2 years).
  7. Visit  Kimberly6891 profile page
    0
    If I decided to go the BSN route, would there be a GPA cap to get into the nursing program still? Or does that just apply to ADN degree programs?
  8. Visit  OB-nurse2013 profile page
    0
    Yes, GPA's are still competitive at universities but each school has different criteria so it's best to look at each school's program that you're interested in. Or just ask me because I think I've looked at almost every local program lol.
  9. Visit  Tommy2001 profile page
    0
    I did a lot of my pre reqs at WCCCD and went to an informational meeting there. I lasted 10 minutes and walked out. I transfered to a four year the next semester. I'm not saying I'm better than people but that group of people was not the group I'd want to nurse with. You want a good education go get your BSN. You get what you pay for. It is much more competitive but you'll be surrounded by front runners. Don't think for a second doctors and BSN's won't judge you for only having an AA. There is no comparision.
  10. Visit  SnowStar4 profile page
    0
    Quote from Tommy2001
    Don't think for a second doctors and BSN's won't judge you for only having an AA. There is no comparision.
    The doctors and I work with have no idea whether I have an ASN, BSN, or even MSN so there's no judgement! They only care how you do your job. And I have no idea what degree most of the nurses I work with have unless I ask. There is no judgement...and I work in a place where they judge you for everything else!
  11. Visit  Tommy2001 profile page
    1
    This may be the case for you but not all. Sorry to seem harsh but it's offensive to me. Would you compare a person who has an AA in Business to a person who has a BS in Business? Of course not. Why do you think it is acceptable to compare an AA nurse to a BSN? An ADN is not at the level of education of a BSN and shouldn't be held to that level. Last time I checked a community college wasn't listed on any list for the top nursing schools, and try to get into an extern program at U of Michigan with an ADN. A smile and a "sorry you don't qualify" Stop trying to compare.
    sunflower777 likes this.
  12. Visit  Kobemuscle profile page
    1
    ADN is he better way to go, much cheaper and same level of education. Actually better in most cases. I work with BSN and they drop out or fail as much as anyone. You will be judged on your level of on the job work not where you went to school or your degree anyone who says different is ignorant. Lots of very successful people in many areas of business don't even have degrees at all, based on the previous posters standard only people with high degrees are successful in their respective fields, let's get real folks. This is all about application in the end not what degree you have or the school you attended, btw, I'm a RN with a MA.
    allyincali likes this.
  13. Visit  Tommy2001 profile page
    1
    If an ADN was the "same level of education" then they would call it a BSN. A two year degree is the same as a four year degree???right...... This is the attitude of nurses who typically believe they know more than the residents. The fact is most of ADN's know what to do but don't know why they do it. The Residents understand this far better. I can't speak for anyone's work ethic, but a two year degree is exactly that a two year technical degree, for people who just want a paycheck. It isn't the same at all. The teaching staff isn't the same. The students aren't the same. The pre-req's aren't the same. Heck! the nursing classes aren't the same. Why would you sell yourself short to a second best education? To achieve only the mininum? This is what I asked myself when I walked out of WCCD's info meeting. An education is an investment not something to look for a "discount" in. This is your career we're talking about not a sale at K-Mart. You get what you pay for. If I was patient I would want someone with a four year nursing degree, not a community college student. No offense.
    OB-nurse2013 likes this.
  14. Visit  CorazonDeOro profile page
    4
    Quote from Tommy2001
    If an ADN was the "same level of education" then they would call it a BSN. A two year degree is the same as a four year degree???right...... This is the attitude of nurses who typically believe they know more than the residents. The fact is most of ADN's know what to do but don't know why they do it. The Residents understand this far better. I can't speak for anyone's work ethic, but a two year degree is exactly that a two year technical degree, for people who just want a paycheck. It isn't the same at all. The teaching staff isn't the same. The students aren't the same. The pre-req's aren't the same. Heck! the nursing classes aren't the same. Why would you sell yourself short to a second best education? To achieve only the mininum? This is what I asked myself when I walked out of WCCD's info meeting. An education is an investment not something to look for a "discount" in. This is your career we're talking about not a sale at K-Mart. You get what you pay for. If I was patient I would want someone with a four year nursing degree, not a community college student. No offense.
    That is interesting since us "uneducated" ADN RNs take the SAME exact NCLEX as BSNs. We must be extra smart to be able to pass with such awful classes and teachers. My instructors at community college were all Masters educated nurses who have also taught at BSN programs, so yes they are the same exact teachers BSNs have. Let's see how far your attitude gets you in the real world where you work along side RNs from all sorts of programs. Btw I have a bachelors degree as well and the only difference between the degrees is the random classes they make you take to have a "bachelors" i.e. two years of pre-reqs and liberal arts, and maybe a community health rotation. But somehow I passed NCLEX in 75 questions without it. Good luck with your career, I hope I never work with you
    And yes I am a new grad with an RN job at one of the bigger Detroit hospitals, so that ADN was obviously good enough. Oh and I did get an Extern position at this same hospital after my first year of nursing, so I must have done something the BSN applicants didn't eh?


    From what I gather you haven't even started nursing school yet, which makes you even more ignorant. How can you have an opinion on how nurses are treated or how it works in the real world if you haven't even experienced it yet? Do you ACTUALLY think a physician will know or care what kind of degree you have? You will be lucky if they remember your name. You have a lot to learn in your BSN program.
    Last edit by CorazonDeOro on Jun 20, '11

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