Is there a nursing shortage? - page 4

Is there in fact a nursing shortage? If so please tell me where. I know respite work is important ... but I'd feel more comfortable knowing if this is a truth ...... Read More

  1. Visit  Pug RN profile page
    1
    I've been a nurse for 14 years, with lots of pediatric experience and NICU experience. My husband got a job in a new area, which has 4 schools of nursing, four!

    I am personally looking at changing my specialty for the first time in my career. I am finding it very difficult to find a job at this time. I may have to take one of those "less desirable" specialties or an area I hadn't previously considered and make it my own to be able to get by.

    I honestly think there is a shortage, but with the economy hospitals and facilities are using less nurses to do more work. So, it may look like there are less nurses needed, but how long will those of us in the work force be able to work our tail feathers off before we burn out and things really do become dismal?
    lindarn likes this.
  2. Visit  Biffbradford profile page
    1
    Did you hear on the news that Obama wants to dump $$$ into training more new healthcare workers to stimulate job growth? Oi!
    lindarn likes this.
  3. Visit  gcupid profile page
    0
    Quote from mofomeat
    While this is disheartening to hear, it's not entirely a surprise.

    I'm a 37 year old male currently in the pre-reqs of the Nursing program of my local community college. I'm in the top of my class, with a 3.7 GPA. While I hear the 'nursing shortage' thing all the time, it reminds me of the "computer science major shortage" of the 1990s. I ended up (with no degree nor formal training) working side-by-side with those guys for most of the last decade in tech support, UNIX administration, network administration, etc.

    I still want to be an RN. I would be lying if I said I wasn't attracted by the stable income and guaranteed job opportunities. Truth be told, however, I'm really in it to help people. It seems that I default to 'taking care' of everyone around me, and when I announced that I wanted to be a nurse, my friends unanimously said "wow, you are really cut out for that".

    However, in this dismal thread, I want to ask:

    1) Of the people who say they cannot find a job, how many of them looked over 'sub-optimal' positions, like geriatric care? Rest homes, terminal patient care, or other things?

    2) It sounds like being a fresh graduate with no experience counts against you, but once you get 3-5 years experience, the "nursing shortage" suddenly becomes a reality. Is this true?

    I ask this because (once again) I'm 37 years old. This is my 3rd career change, and my guess is that (like everything else), if you walk into something as a fresh, green newbie, you better have the attitude of "make me your little *****" for the first couple of years. Expect to have and do all the **** jobs for awhile. Not until you've done the lowest of the low, will you have the EXP and level-ups to start calling your own shots. Only then, can your dream be realized.

    Am I on the right path, or am I delusional?


    Thanks and bacon planks.
    Could it be that the questions you are asking incenuate that younger, 1rst career individuals could possibly be unemployed because they refuse to accept "sub-optimal" positions (the term you used to describe positions that revolve around geriatric care)?

    I ask this b/c I'm in my 20's and find it insulting. I dont know what you did in your 20's but many young adults have responsibilities that can not be taken care of by their parents. We are still adults. Many of us have mortgages, children,, sick parents to take care of, etc. just like older adults...

    The media has a lot of people fooled. Is it that hard to believe that as a nurse it may be difficult to find a full time job?

    I have spoken to a few nursing students and they all seem to look at the individual nurse as being the problem until they graduate and can't find a job..... but who knows? at 37yo you may have an advantage bc your not too old to hire yet...and as a new nurse, u definitely wouldn't command the same salary as another 37 yo nurse who has chosen the field earlier in life.
  4. Visit  mofomeat profile page
    0
    Quote from gcupid
    Could it be that the questions you are asking incenuate that younger, 1rst career individuals could possibly be unemployed because they refuse to accept "sub-optimal" positions (the term you used to describe positions that revolve around geriatric care)?
    I wasn't insinuating, I was asking if it was the case that some people were looking over unglorious types of work. While I probably could have worded it better, it was an honest question.

    Quote from gcupid
    I ask this b/c I'm in my 20's and find it insulting. I dont know what you did in your 20's but many young adults have responsibilities that can not be taken care of by their parents. We are still adults. Many of us have mortgages, children,, sick parents to take care of, etc. just like older adults...
    I was asking about "new grads" in general, I didn't say anything about the age of the grads. However, I am sorry if it sounded that way. It wasn't my intent to insult anyone.

    No I don't find it so hard to believe that a nurse can find full-time time work. And yes, I expect my own age to count against me more than help.
  5. Visit  checker1981 profile page
    0
    I am a new grad and this is my third career as well. I entered nursing in my early 30's. I had a difficult time finding a job in my opinion, graduated in May 2011. I sent applications everywhere and filled out over 250 applications.

    In July, I was offered a 'sub-optimal" job as a RN on overnights in the local nursing home. And as you described I was going to be the grunt on the night shift. The nursing home requires a RN on duty 24 hours a day, but is mostly ran by LPN's. The nursing director was an LPN who interviewed me and when I sat down for the interview she described the job I would be doing as LPN work with a 20-25 patient assignment based on census. My charge nurse would be an LPN. My pay would be LPN level pay and I asked her where the RN house nurse would be working. She explained that I would be the RN house nurse on nights (just in case anyone fell or needed an assessment). This job was 'sub optimal' and many nursing homes are taking advantage of new grads. I declined the job offer and kept looking.

    By October I was offered a med-surg job at a local hospital and I now work on a med-surg floor, they asked me in my interview if I wanted days or nights (my choice). Like all the other nurses I work every 3rd weekend and every 3rd holiday. I am treated the same as any nurse on my floor and I am not their %^&*^. I obviously cannot get a job as a nursing manager (nor would I want one at this point in my career) but I didn't have to go to work in a "'sub-optimal' position". They said after 6 months off orientation I could switch to ICU or ER. Many of the people in my orientation group were also new grads. It seems your main question is: If you become a nurse will you be treated poorly for your first few years? In my experience, not unless you let someone treat you that way or take advantage of your license.

    At my hospital they only want you to start in med-surg for a minimum of 6 months so you learn prioritization/patient assessment/charting. Good luck and if you want to become a nurse don't let the 6 months after nursing school deter you. It was a real pain and I am glad it is over, but I will never have difficulty finding a job again with experience.
  6. Visit  mofomeat profile page
    0
    Quote from checker1981
    I am a new grad and this is my third career as well. I entered nursing in my early 30's. I had a difficult time finding a job in my opinion, graduated in May 2011. I sent applications everywhere and filled out over 250 applications.

    In July, I was offered a 'sub-optimal" job as a RN on overnights in the local nursing home. And as you described I was going to be the grunt on the night shift. The nursing home requires a RN on duty 24 hours a day, but is mostly ran by LPN's. The nursing director was an LPN who interviewed me and when I sat down for the interview she described the job I would be doing as LPN work with a 20-25 patient assignment based on census. My charge nurse would be an LPN. My pay would be LPN level pay and I asked her where the RN house nurse would be working. She explained that I would be the RN house nurse on nights (just in case anyone fell or needed an assessment). This job was 'sub optimal' and many nursing homes are taking advantage of new grads. I declined the job offer and kept looking.

    By October I was offered a med-surg job at a local hospital and I now work on a med-surg floor, they asked me in my interview if I wanted days or nights (my choice). Like all the other nurses I work every 3rd weekend and every 3rd holiday. I am treated the same as any nurse on my floor and I am not their %^&*^. I obviously cannot get a job as a nursing manager (nor would I want one at this point in my career) but I didn't have to go to work in a "'sub-optimal' position". They said after 6 months off orientation I could switch to ICU or ER. Many of the people in my orientation group were also new grads. It seems your main question is: If you become a nurse will you be treated poorly for your first few years? In my experience, not unless you let someone treat you that way or take advantage of your license.

    At my hospital they only want you to start in med-surg for a minimum of 6 months so you learn prioritization/patient assessment/charting. Good luck and if you want to become a nurse don't let the 6 months after nursing school deter you. It was a real pain and I am glad it is over, but I will never have difficulty finding a job again with experience.

    Thanks for the reply.

    Also, 6 months is nothing in the grand scheme of things.
  7. Visit  nurse2011RN profile page
    0
    I have about 3 years experience as a med-surg RN. I have been unable to find work; hospital say they want "experienced" RNs. They want specialty experience, ie ICU, ER, etc. It is hard to find work if your experience is "just" on a med/surg floor. I have been looking for work since April, 2011, in Oregon. No luck. I changed careers to become an RN. Had I known it was this difficult to find work, I would not have done it. Kind of a bummer because I like being a nurse. You read all these posts of people complaining, well at least you guys have a job.
  8. Visit  mofomeat profile page
    0
    Quote from nurse2011RN
    I have about 3 years experience as a med-surg RN. I have been unable to find work; hospital say they want "experienced" RNs. They want specialty experience, ie ICU, ER, etc. It is hard to find work if your experience is "just" on a med/surg floor. I have been looking for work since April, 2011, in Oregon. No luck. I changed careers to become an RN. Had I known it was this difficult to find work, I would not have done it. Kind of a bummer because I like being a nurse. You read all these posts of people complaining, well at least you guys have a job.
    Have you considered relocation?

    I'm not a nurse yet, but I left Oregon because of its rampant unemployment about a decade ago. Oregon is beautiful, my family is there, I grew up there and it's ultimately where I call 'home', but I had a hard time staying employed even on minimum wage jobs (which seems to be what most of them are). Hopefully you are at least near Portland or Salem or somewhere semi-populated, because if you're down in the Rogue Valley or out East I'd tell you to get out of that place as soon as you can. Of course, WA and CA will probably have more opportunity, but they'll also be expensive places to live.

    Good luck.
  9. Visit  Noimanurse profile page
    0
    I've noticed a huge nursing shortage...it seems that most of the nurses I work with are 5'2"-5'8" so I'm more than a foot taller than most of my co-workers. This nursing "short"age is crazy!
  10. Visit  AdrianP RN profile page
    0
    Took me over 350 applications and 7 different states to finally get a job. Almost 10 months of intensive searching and applying. I would say there is a shortage of experienced nurses. New grads. are having a hell of a time finding jobs.

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