Getting a Boost Because You Are A Minority - pg.2 | allnurses

Getting a Boost Because You Are A Minority - page 2

Guys, 'just curious. As a minority, have you felt that maybe being a minority somehow enhanced you getting accepted into Nursing school or somehow maybe received a boost when in school? Gals:... Read More

  1. Visit  Ntheboat2 profile page
    0
    Oh, right....women are just too shy to ask for more money. That isn't sexist at ALL! Tell that to Lily Ledbetter.
  2. Visit  mjaybx profile page
    0
    I have to disagree about the preferential treatment for being minority statement. I recently applied to an LPN to RN bridge and let me tell you the nursing department is majority white. They have preference for their own applicants and don't favor minority applicants as much. I was told by a nursing faculty that I was "Jumping the gun" by fulfilling all the requirements and applying while a white student who was applying to the program without advance standing as an lpn was given the royal treatment.
  3. Visit  Ntheboat2 profile page
    0
    Quote from mjaybx
    I have to disagree about the preferential treatment for being minority statement. I recently applied to an LPN to RN bridge and let me tell you the nursing department is majority white. They have preference for their own applicants and don't favor minority applicants as much. I was told by a nursing faculty that I was "Jumping the gun" by fulfilling all the requirements and applying while a white student who was applying to the program without advance standing as an lpn was given the royal treatment.
    If the white student wasn't an LPN then how can you compare the way you were treated when applying to the LPN-RN program to how he was treated when applying to what I assume is the traditional program? The requirements are not the same because they are not the same program.
  4. Visit  mjaybx profile page
    0
    It is the same program you just get advance standing as an LPN and can apply at any semester, it's not a different program. I can compare because I was told I was jumping the gun, wouldn't he be jumping the gun by applying as well?? The requirements are the same, we both have to take an NLN and take the same classes in order to apply.
  5. Visit  PRICHARILLAisMISSED profile page
    0
    @ Ntheboat2

    I'm sure many women are not to shy to ask for more money. But on average, yes, males are more prone to do so. I read a study on this once, and I really wish I could remember where so I can give you a link. I would love it if all things were equal between all races and genders. But at the same time I know what I see. What I see is that most people do not want equal treatment. what they want is for themselves to keep whatever advantages they already have, but for everything ELSE to be equal...

    This article provides a small amount of proof to this. I mean I'm sure that even if you do not admit to it, most would agree that being a White male is somewhat of a disadvantage when applying for a job (or a student loan...), yet since Nursing supposedly treats males as a minority for entrance purposes, there is a problem with this. One out of how many professions, and it is a problem? Granted, it really sucks for female nurses, but how they feel about this, us males feel about EVERYTHING ELSE.

    And by reading some of the posts on AN, it looks as if that "Minority status" doesn't hold water anyway in many cases...
  6. Visit  PRICHARILLAisMISSED profile page
    1
    [QUOTE=Ntheboat2;7025452]Seriously...in the year 2012 in a "civilized country" where men still get paid significantly more than women for the EXACT same jobs and there are WAY MORE male dominated professions....I would really be embarrassed as a male to say I wasn't treated "fairly" in the nursing profession.

    The article is not asking whether Males are treated unfairly, it is asking whether they (we) feel if we have ever been given preferential treatment due to our gender in this PARTICULAR profession. BTW, I asked the department head at my school if me being a male counts toward entering the program, and was told "NO, t goes by a point system" plain and simple, with the TEAS being the largest single source of points.
    SummitRN likes this.
  7. Visit  Ntheboat2 profile page
    0
    [QUOTE=PRICHARILLAisMISSED;7036256]
    Quote from Ntheboat2
    Seriously...in the year 2012 in a "civilized country" where men still get paid significantly more than women for the EXACT same jobs and there are WAY MORE male dominated professions....I would really be embarrassed as a male to say I wasn't treated "fairly" in the nursing profession.

    The article is not asking whether Males are treated unfairly, it is asking whether they (we) feel if we have ever been given preferential treatment due to our gender in this PARTICULAR profession. BTW, I asked the department head at my school if me being a male counts toward entering the program, and was told "NO, t goes by a point system" plain and simple, with the TEAS being the largest single source of points.
    I realize that the question was about getting preferential treatment in the nursing profession. I was just stating that considering the FACT that most professions are male dominated and ALL professions males get paid more than women, I don't think it's that big of a deal if they don't get preferential treatment or even EQUAL treatment for that matter.

    I think a male not getting preferential treatment or even equal treatment in nursing and having a problem with that would be about as silly as a male complaining that he didn't get accepted into a girls-only school. White males dominate practically everything and then want "equal treatment" or TRY to use gender to an advantage for the very, very few areas where they might be considered a minority.

    A male in the nursing world....welcome to females every day lives in all professions! (oh, except you get paid more, minority or not.)
  8. Visit  umbdude profile page
    0
    [QUOTE=Ntheboat2;7037461]
    Quote from PRICHARILLAisMISSED

    I think a male not getting preferential treatment or even equal treatment in nursing and having a problem with that would be about as silly as a male complaining that he didn't get accepted into a girls-only school. White males dominate practically everything and then want "equal treatment" or TRY to use gender to an advantage for the very, very few areas where they might be considered a minority.

    A male in the nursing world....welcome to females every day lives in all professions! (oh, except you get paid more, minority or not.)
    It is wrong to say that it's silly for a man to complain about not getting equal treatment. Not getting equal treatment based on gender is discrimination, whether you are male or female. I understand and empathize that females have been discriminated against historically, but it doesn't justify doing the same to males.
  9. Visit  chuckster profile page
    1
    Quote from Clodhopper
    Guys,
    'just curious. As a minority, have you felt that maybe being a minority somehow enhanced you getting accepted into Nursing school or somehow maybe received a boost when in school?

    Gals: Have you ever observed any specific instance or generally felt that men receive a boost in Nursing because of their minority status? Again, just curious.
    My minority status as a male got me admitted to a highly competitive nursing program. That, and scores in the 95th to 99th percentiles of the standardized admissions test and a GPA in the science pre-reqs of 3.8. . .
    PRICHARILLAisMISSED likes this.
  10. Visit  Jarreux profile page
    0
    Quote from Ruby Vee
    Getting a boost because you're a minority? Maybe not, but I do believe men get a boost because they're men. Even in nursing, which is (or is supposed to be) a primarily female profession, I think men get more money and more opportunities.

    My husband and I are both ICU nurses, and when we moved cross country a few years ago, I got a position at Man's Best Hospital, to start two months down the road. It wasn't easy, despite my quarter century of nursing experience and rave letters of recommendation to even get the interview. I went through all the appropriate steps -- online application and resume submission, etc. I POLISHED that resume and cover letter. I had 20 years of experience with the particular patient population, had been published writing about the patient population and had piloted a program at my previous workplace that MBH was trying to get off the ground. After three interviews, I finally got the job. After hearing me rave about the fantastic opportunity, DH called the manager of the unit where I was going to work and asked for a job. He got it.

    We started on the same day, but I was hired first and was therefore eligible for a bonus for recruiting DH. Nevertheless, they started him higher on the seniority list because it was "alphabetical." (Same last name, and my first initial preceded his.)

    I had five more years of experience as a nurse, ten more years of experience with the particular patient population and a master's degree as opposed to his associate's. He made five cents more an hour to start.

    After one year, RNs were eligible for promotion if they completed a project, joined one of the unit committees, submitted an application and supporting letters of recommendation from colleagues and taught an in-service. DH did none of those things. I did all of them. He got the promotion and the pay raise. I did not. ("Different evaluators," my manager said. "We try to be fair, but sometimes it's more subjective. You can apply again next year.")

    It's now been years. There have been several reviews, we've both had pay raises and I finally got the promotion. But because all of the pay raises are based on a percentage of your salary, he's now making over a dollar an hour more than me, and for as long as we work there that will be the case. DH is an excellent nurse, and I'm very happy for him that he's been recognized for his excellence. But the only reason HE can think of for the disparity in our salary and for his preferential treatment is that he's male.
    This is unfair on so many levels. Sorry
  11. Visit  Ntheboat2 profile page
    0
    Quote from Ruby Vee
    Getting a boost because you're a minority? Maybe not, but I do believe men get a boost because they're men. Even in nursing, which is (or is supposed to be) a primarily female profession, I think men get more money and more opportunities.

    My husband and I are both ICU nurses, and when we moved cross country a few years ago, I got a position at Man's Best Hospital, to start two months down the road. It wasn't easy, despite my quarter century of nursing experience and rave letters of recommendation to even get the interview. I went through all the appropriate steps -- online application and resume submission, etc. I POLISHED that resume and cover letter. I had 20 years of experience with the particular patient population, had been published writing about the patient population and had piloted a program at my previous workplace that MBH was trying to get off the ground. After three interviews, I finally got the job. After hearing me rave about the fantastic opportunity, DH called the manager of the unit where I was going to work and asked for a job. He got it.

    We started on the same day, but I was hired first and was therefore eligible for a bonus for recruiting DH. Nevertheless, they started him higher on the seniority list because it was "alphabetical." (Same last name, and my first initial preceded his.)

    I had five more years of experience as a nurse, ten more years of experience with the particular patient population and a master's degree as opposed to his associate's. He made five cents more an hour to start.

    After one year, RNs were eligible for promotion if they completed a project, joined one of the unit committees, submitted an application and supporting letters of recommendation from colleagues and taught an in-service. DH did none of those things. I did all of them. He got the promotion and the pay raise. I did not. ("Different evaluators," my manager said. "We try to be fair, but sometimes it's more subjective. You can apply again next year.")

    It's now been years. There have been several reviews, we've both had pay raises and I finally got the promotion. But because all of the pay raises are based on a percentage of your salary, he's now making over a dollar an hour more than me, and for as long as we work there that will be the case. DH is an excellent nurse, and I'm very happy for him that he's been recognized for his excellence. But the only reason HE can think of for the disparity in our salary and for his preferential treatment is that he's male.
    It's disgusting is what it is.

    So are the people who think there is nothing wrong with it and continue to say so with their votes.
  12. Visit  PRICHARILLAisMISSED profile page
    0
    Quote from Ntheboat2
    It's disgusting is what it is.

    So are the people who think there is nothing wrong with it and continue to say so with their votes.
    So then, you are saying it IS ok for females to hold an advantage to getting hired just about anywhere other than the Nursing profession, but "Disgusting" if a male has an advantage in this one field?

    Really!??!!
  13. Visit  Guttercat profile page
    0
    Experientially speaking only, it seems men are tracked into management and charge nurse capacities much more quickly. It's aggravating.

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