Changing Careers to Nursing as 35 year old man - page 2

I am currently employed in IT but hate it. I've been considering a career change. My wife is a nurse and I am 35 with two young children. There is a local tech school that has an ADN program. I... Read More

  1. Visit  veggie530 profile page
    0
    Quote from sterling684
    if i where you, i would check in your local area and see if there is any accelerated bsn programs available. if so, complete the prerequisite requirements and apply. i see no reason to settle for an adn when you could complete your bsn just as quick... being that you have already completed your bachelors, you could also check and see if there is a physician assistant program in your area.
    why do that when you can do an adn program (cheap, cheap, cheap) and subsequently bridge to a msn with his already finished b.s.?
  2. Visit  veggie530 profile page
    0
    Quote from chuckster
    Perhaps, but if so it's virtually imperceptible.

    Unlikely. The BSN is the new holy grail of nursing. Though this varies somewhat across the US, the trend is toward the BSN as the minimum educational credential. Virtually every hospital nursing position now states "BSN required" where in the recent past it may have been "BSN preferred." Increasingly, even nursing homes are restricting hiring to BSN's (at least in my area). Plan for the BSN. One route is to get your ADN, pass the NCLEX and do an on-line RN-BSN. If you do the ADN at a CC and choose a RN-BSN program at UT-A, U Wyoming, OU (or any one of dozen reasonably priced programs) you could wind up spending less than $18k for both the ADN and BSN. That's less than most BSN programs in 4 year schools.
    This makes more sense. I ask you though, Chuckster... BSN is the new holy grail, but would it be better for someone to bridge to a MSN with their already finished B.S. in ___ology, or to actually get a BSN?
  3. Visit  tenjuna profile page
    0
    Welcome to the club...41 years old here and just jumped off the IT boat after 25 years. Got tired of sitting on my backside and wanted to do something that made a difference.

    You can do it!
  4. Visit  chuckster profile page
    0
    Quote from veggie530
    This makes more sense. I ask you though, Chuckster... BSN is the new holy grail, but would it be better for someone to bridge to a MSN with their already finished B.S. in ___ology, or to actually get a BSN?
    I debated about this as well - as a previous degree holder (though in my case BA and MBA) before becoming an RN, I could have gone directly to an MSN program rather than getting my BSN. My ultimate goal is PMHNP, so I obviously need the MSN but it was actually less expensive and no more time consuming to get the BSN first. All of the MSN programs for second-degree, non-BSN's require a number of "bridge" classes. These are essentially undergrad level courses that attempt to bridge the essential BSN-type coursework you missed. Depending on the program, there may be 3 or 4 needed and they will take 2 or 3 semesters. Few schools actually give your the BSN as part of the deal and you are charged graduate tuition rates for the courses - in my view, a waste of both time and money. In the same 9 - 12 month time frame and for the cost of just one of the bridge courses, you can get a BSN from any one of several fully accredited schools (e. g., UT-A, OU, Wyoming, SUNY - to name just a few of the programs out there that are in the $8 - $10k range for an on-line RN-BSN).

    This has strayed somewhat from your question about getting an MSN without bothering with a BSN. My opinion is that you will be at a considerable disadvantage in lining up that all-important first job as a newly minted RN with an MSN but with essentially no nursing experience beyond your program's clinicals. Getting a nursing job as new grad is difficult in most parts of the country. BSN's seem to have an easier time than ADN's but I think most hospital would be very reluctant to hire a new grad MSN for a variety of reasons, not least salary. Perhaps someone with a recruiting or HR background can provide some better insight however.
    Last edit by chuckster on Aug 3, '12
  5. Visit  Clodhopper profile page
    1
    A 50 year old career changer here. I'm switching out of engineering after a successful 27 year stint in it to pursue healthcare, namely nursing. This is something that I have always intended to do, as you only live once & I want as diverse an experience possible. Last spring my son enlisted, leaving my wife and I empty nesters. I took a look around and realized that this was the time to do it. Could afford to take the income hit of going to school & not much working a job, kids out of college & the house altogether, plus, at 50 I still get a good 15 years or more in doing this. The timing of everything was that, if I am was going to switch careers, it would never be better than now to do so. So, here I am! Nursing I & related classes starts at the end of the month.


    I really do enjoy the surprised reactions received from some when they ask me what I am switching from to nursing. Some are mildly shocked that I am switching from engineering to nursing??????? One time two nuclear engineering students I was co-teacher in a class to actually startled, as in that little jump we make with genuinely surprised, when told this. He He He.
    umbdude likes this.
  6. Visit  rickbar profile page
    0
    I am a male RN (ADN) x 16 years, all at the bedside. I tell you no BS. The people that work under you resent you. It's not you they are angry at but it gets directed at you. The people under you work very short handed and they know it and they resent it. I work in a vent unit and my aids care for 10 freaking patients at a time. That is insane. The family's are ******, the patients and docs get ******......that **** is coming your way. The bosses can't give a crap. In the last year, I have seen the bosses ignore patient and family complaints. The bosses have the attitude that seems to say "We are making money, more staff means less money, sorry" and that is the attitude they have with the customers !!!! The staff that you depend on is in the same boat. We run with 2 resp. techs, 15 years ago, we had 4 on duty. The equipment we use today is at least 15 years old. It is not uncommon for me to strip a patient on a vent of a pulse ox cable and put it on a new admit. The Boss tells you to do it and tells you that the patient has been stable. No patient on a vent should not have a pulse ox on. Even the cleaning crew gets backed up and gets ****** off about it. But the real crazies are the nurses you work with. Nurses are like a lot of other people. They come to work all ****** off at the kids or some other BS and they always find the male RN to take it out on. Think long and hard bro. If I knew 16 years ago what I know today !!
    Never would have happened.
  7. Visit  LoveCali profile page
    0
    44 year old new grad with ADN. I work on a tele unit at a large hospital, the staff loves male RN's, the patients think you're the doctor. Managers like the guys. You'll always be asked to help move heavy patients or open containers. Dude, go for it. Network like hell while in school so you have a job waiting for you. With your wife as an RN you have a huge advantage as she can teach you and help you study. Maybe down the road you would be interested in health-IT systems. WGU has an online degree I think. It's a lot of hard, stressful work...
  8. Visit  vang1127 profile page
    0
    35 year old new grad with BSN here. I did an accelerated program out of state - the hard part was not school but being away from my wife and baby. School was not too bad; however, looking for my first job (esp. in the Bay Area) is much tougher.
    Go for it man and start networking while you are in school! Good luck and you'll do great!
  9. Visit  vang1127 profile page
    0
    35 year old new grad with BSN here. I did an accelerated program out of state - the hard part was not school but being away from my wife and baby. School was not too bad; however, looking for my first job (esp. in the Bay Area) is much tougher.&nbsp;<br>Go for it man and start networking while you are in school! Good luck and you'll do great!
  10. Visit  jgr1001nurse profile page
    1
    Hey man. I'm 41 and have been a nurse for about 6 months. I switched from heavy manufacturing (22 years in the same job before the switch). I currently work in a correctional facility (prison, all male). The female staff there certainly appreciates having males. Some of our "patients" are not allowed any female contact due to their crimes or conduct. You are looking at a field that is predominately female. While you are in school, pay close attention to the drama in class as it will be the same in the workplace. If you can't put up with the drama, don't do it. Most females I work with are glad to have a male nurse around because they don't like working with all females either (I'm not woman-bashing, this is what women are saying about women).
    Finding a job with your level of education is all up to where you live. I'm an LPN and had multiple job offers when I started at the correctional facility. I will be in my community college LPN-RN bridge program and plan on going on to BSN. But I had no problem at all finding a job as an LPN. I took a substantial cut in pay from manufacturing to LPN, but I decided the experience would be invaluable.
    Best of luck. It takes a lot of courage to change careers. It takes a lot of work too.
    FMF Corpsman likes this.
  11. Visit  Jasano profile page
    0
    I'm a male nurse who's actively been seeking employment for several months in my home province of Ontario, Canada. It's been extremely difficult and discouraging. I would not recommend the nursing field to other men, as I have always had a more difficult time than my female counterparts, in finding work.

    With the economy in the state that it is, career change would be ill-advised; even if your job entails watching paint dry - keep it.
  12. Visit  GitanoRN profile page
    0
    Quote from Jasano
    I'm a male nurse who's actively been seeking employment for several months in my home province of Ontario, Canada. It's been extremely difficult and discouraging. I would not recommend the nursing field to other men, as I have always had a more difficult time than my female counterparts, in finding work.

    With the economy in the state that it is, career change would be ill-advised; even if your job entails watching paint dry - keep it.
    Don't despair everyone is going through the same situation, however, have you tried placing an application to a correctional facility? they are always looking for help, or a Temporary Nursing Agency or Health Insurance Co., or even private duty cases until something else comes along... Wishing you the best in all of your future endeavors...Aloha~
  13. Visit  NursingCareers profile page
    0
    Mid-40s, male, 3 kids, IT 20+ years and making the same switch into nursing as my wife. We were "warned" about how difficult Anatomy, Chem, Physio, etc. would be. Laughably easy compared to having to relearn everything in IT every 6-12 months. My wife went through an ABSN after her industry was destroyed by outsourcing and her class was full of career changers of all ages coming from business, law, engineering, etc. People that have been in healthcare 10+ years simply don't realize what is happening in other industries. I hear nurses complain that they have to compete against 200 people for a job. That sounds like heaven from where we sit. It's all relative I suppose.

    Go for it. Though if I was your age I'd be gunning for medical school.


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and find your dream job.

Top
close
close