Latest Comments by ArmyMedicRN

ArmyMedicRN, BSN, RN 1,914 Views

Joined: Jun 3, '13; Posts: 48 (33% Liked) ; Likes: 27

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  • 2
    Have Nurse and Chuckleface like this.

    The Army is the branch to join if you want to fight in a war. They are the branch that fights on land. Know that nurses aren't a combat arms job, but they do still have units that are deployed with nurses, such as an FST or CSH. Army is way more highspeed by any measure and you will have way more possibilities to test your mettle and resolve; however, they don't have ranks with cool names like Commander .

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    Marine7 likes this.

    Make sure you bring EVERY single medical document if you have anything in your medical history. If you wear glasses only sometimes, bring them. You will be weighed, be sure you don't exceed the Air Force's allotted weight for your height--if you do you will need to be taped for BF%. Do not fail this or you will be a no go. You will be placed in a room with other females and told to strip to your underwear, you will then do a whole series of movements with your body so they can determine if you have any major disabilities--this is where you will walk like a duck. They will check your no-no spot and booty hole pretty closely during the one on one so be clean and prepared. You will have your blood drawn, urine collected, hearing checked, vision checked, and past criminal history reviewed. If you don't know the dates of any run ins with the law, you should review them. You will empty your pockets of everything and place them in a cubbie, recommend to not bring anything of great value. You will need your driver's license or state ID. Oh, and listen VERY carefully to the personnel at each station, they tell you exactly what to do, where to go, and how to do it--a glimpse of what's to come for your existence in the military. Follow exactly to the letter the instructions without assuming anything. Did I mention wear clean underwear?

  • 6

    Cleared for Commissioning!

  • 1
    Spring624 likes this.

    Me too. It's very frustrating.

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    Definitely get into shape now if you're seriously considering it. Make sure you don't have any medical disqualifications... If you do, get a doctor to clear you. If you have any medical diagnoses on your record, it's more than likely going to need to be cleared, unless it's something very small, like ear infection as a child. If you have a serious medical condition, pretty much don't bother with the military, they won't let anyone who is non deployable serve anymore (exceptions still occur). Best of luck.

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    Quote from caliotter3
    Then why express your desire to work in this environment? I would consider it an affront to those of us who have served. Please do not go into this with a negative attitude. There are plenty of employment venues available where you don't have to have military service pushed in your face on a daily basis. Not everyone finds it to be a mistake.
    Amen to that.

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    Quote from Chadmasters
    Not making that mistake again!
    You think it was a mistake to serve your country? Sounds toxic to me.

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    I don't think the terminology is deployed, it might be mobilized, then again I'm not familiar with the Reserve system too much. And your spouse can of course go with you, but the question is will the Army pay for it and give her benefits, this is called "command sponsored." Not entirely sure about that, I guess it depends on your mission and the units funds.

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    This is excellent. Thank you for your detailed explanations.

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    Pixie.RN, about what time at BOLC did you receive your PCS orders for your permanent duty station? I have a house and family to get ready for move, so I'm trying to plan everything out.

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    I see now that you said you have a letter of recommendation from your doctor, I must've missed that bullet earlier. Anyway, that is a good starting point and should suffice at least for now. As long as you don't have any other conditions that need waivers, you should be able to safely create a packet and apply. Worse case scenario besides being DQ'd is the Navy needing additional evaluations from other doctors just to be certain. As a side, without getting too personal, if you've ever had any self harm, suicidal attempts, or had to be inpatient psych, I'm not certain, but that may be quite hard, if not impossible, to get a waiver. You would have to ask someone with first hand experience on this subject and definitely tell your recruiter, they have access to all the requirements.

  • 0

    Hello. Glad to hear you want to serve your country! Your circumstances are indeed an uphill battle, that's for sure. Before you even delve into the process of applying for Officership and this and that you should get in touch with a specialist doctor, a psychiatrist in your case, unless you already have one. You are going to need a written letter from a doctor familiar with your case that states explicitly that you are cleared for military duty and your medical condition will in no way ever interfere with your ability to complete your duties. If it doesn't say that or something similar, I can tell you that you will never get a waiver approved. So, first things first...get an appointment and see if a doctor even thinks you are cleared because if not, you will spend tons of time and energy in fruitlessly applying for the military when you will be inevitably disqualified later. Good luck to you.

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    Spring624 likes this.

    Quote from Spring624
    Do you know what site you can go to check scroll status? I have been selected for the reserves and am waiting for scroll.
    It's through the Congress.gov website, but I wouldn't be surprised if they don't upload the forms that timely. Your recruiter will probably get the status much quicker than that, but you can always check. Just go to the Congress.gov website and search your name.


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