Latest Likes For areensee

Latest Likes For areensee

areensee 1,597 Views

Joined Aug 11, '05. Posts: 68 (37% Liked) Likes: 65

Sorted By Last Like Received (Max 500)
  • Apr 17

    Quote from ®Nurse
    I see a trend that concerns me greatly over the past 10 years: Students are coming out onto the clinical floors and need waaaaaaay more direction than they used to. The students used to be assigned to the PATIENT, and seek out direction from the Clinical Instructor for guidance.

    NOW, the Student Nurse appears to be assigned to the Patient AND the RN, with the Clinical Instructor off somewhere else.
    I am a clinical instructor and I understand your concern. It appears to me that students are coming into nursing programs less prepared than they used to. That isn't the fault of the nursing programs but rather our elementary and high school systems. Our kids aren't learning what they should be learning. On the college level I expect that students understand at least the basics of grammar and know how to spell common words. What I find is that they often can't spell even common words and have no understanding of punctuation.

    As far as your observations of clinical instructors, I can't speak to all of them, but that's not how I operate. It is important that I be as involved in the student's clinical experience as possible. Some limitations are actually imposed by the facility. For example, in one facility neither the students or the instructor are allowed to provide hygiene care. This must be done by the facility's CNA's. How can students learn if they aren't allowed to lay their hands on the patients?

  • Mar 14

    Quote from ®Nurse
    I see a trend that concerns me greatly over the past 10 years: Students are coming out onto the clinical floors and need waaaaaaay more direction than they used to. The students used to be assigned to the PATIENT, and seek out direction from the Clinical Instructor for guidance.

    NOW, the Student Nurse appears to be assigned to the Patient AND the RN, with the Clinical Instructor off somewhere else.
    I am a clinical instructor and I understand your concern. It appears to me that students are coming into nursing programs less prepared than they used to. That isn't the fault of the nursing programs but rather our elementary and high school systems. Our kids aren't learning what they should be learning. On the college level I expect that students understand at least the basics of grammar and know how to spell common words. What I find is that they often can't spell even common words and have no understanding of punctuation.

    As far as your observations of clinical instructors, I can't speak to all of them, but that's not how I operate. It is important that I be as involved in the student's clinical experience as possible. Some limitations are actually imposed by the facility. For example, in one facility neither the students or the instructor are allowed to provide hygiene care. This must be done by the facility's CNA's. How can students learn if they aren't allowed to lay their hands on the patients?

  • Mar 10

    Quote from ®Nurse
    I see a trend that concerns me greatly over the past 10 years: Students are coming out onto the clinical floors and need waaaaaaay more direction than they used to. The students used to be assigned to the PATIENT, and seek out direction from the Clinical Instructor for guidance.

    NOW, the Student Nurse appears to be assigned to the Patient AND the RN, with the Clinical Instructor off somewhere else.
    I am a clinical instructor and I understand your concern. It appears to me that students are coming into nursing programs less prepared than they used to. That isn't the fault of the nursing programs but rather our elementary and high school systems. Our kids aren't learning what they should be learning. On the college level I expect that students understand at least the basics of grammar and know how to spell common words. What I find is that they often can't spell even common words and have no understanding of punctuation.

    As far as your observations of clinical instructors, I can't speak to all of them, but that's not how I operate. It is important that I be as involved in the student's clinical experience as possible. Some limitations are actually imposed by the facility. For example, in one facility neither the students or the instructor are allowed to provide hygiene care. This must be done by the facility's CNA's. How can students learn if they aren't allowed to lay their hands on the patients?

  • Mar 9

    Quote from ®Nurse
    I see a trend that concerns me greatly over the past 10 years: Students are coming out onto the clinical floors and need waaaaaaay more direction than they used to. The students used to be assigned to the PATIENT, and seek out direction from the Clinical Instructor for guidance.

    NOW, the Student Nurse appears to be assigned to the Patient AND the RN, with the Clinical Instructor off somewhere else.
    I am a clinical instructor and I understand your concern. It appears to me that students are coming into nursing programs less prepared than they used to. That isn't the fault of the nursing programs but rather our elementary and high school systems. Our kids aren't learning what they should be learning. On the college level I expect that students understand at least the basics of grammar and know how to spell common words. What I find is that they often can't spell even common words and have no understanding of punctuation.

    As far as your observations of clinical instructors, I can't speak to all of them, but that's not how I operate. It is important that I be as involved in the student's clinical experience as possible. Some limitations are actually imposed by the facility. For example, in one facility neither the students or the instructor are allowed to provide hygiene care. This must be done by the facility's CNA's. How can students learn if they aren't allowed to lay their hands on the patients?

  • Mar 3

    Aside from the fact that the hospitalist in this case is a first class jerk, I've been thinking more about the practice of frequent vitals and all the other horrid things we do to people in the middle of the night. Here's an interesting question. I worked acute care for 15 years and have done vitals at all hours of the day and night. My question is this, is there any evidence that doing so makes any difference in the outcome for our patients? Is there any best practice, any, evidence based practice guidelines? If so, I've never seen them! SO . . . how about some nursing research into the subject? Any takers? Are we simply doing what the administration thinks will open up a bed sooner ($$) or do the things we do actually improve the lives of our patients?

  • Mar 2

    Yes, get out of there! You have what is known as a hostile working environment, and you may be in very real danger. I very much appreciate those civil rights pioneers who risked their lives (and those who lost their lives) to further the cause of social equality, but your life may be in danger and no job is worth that!

  • Mar 1

    So who authorized the enema on the dementia patient? I'd want to have a word with them. Being a hospice nurse this sounds like something that should not have happened. This very well may have BEEN an assault. It angers me to no end when the right to dignity and comfort are forfeited just because a patient suffers from cognitive impairment. Why wasn't the patient at least given medication to relax him prior to the procedure. Don't we do this much for our pets? Why do we treat our elders with such disdain and dishonor? This is one of the big reasons I left hospital nursing after 15 years. I just got tired of trying to convince people they needed to have painful treatments done that they didn't really want.

  • Mar 1

    Yes, get out of there! You have what is known as a hostile working environment, and you may be in very real danger. I very much appreciate those civil rights pioneers who risked their lives (and those who lost their lives) to further the cause of social equality, but your life may be in danger and no job is worth that!

  • Mar 1

    So who authorized the enema on the dementia patient? I'd want to have a word with them. Being a hospice nurse this sounds like something that should not have happened. This very well may have BEEN an assault. It angers me to no end when the right to dignity and comfort are forfeited just because a patient suffers from cognitive impairment. Why wasn't the patient at least given medication to relax him prior to the procedure. Don't we do this much for our pets? Why do we treat our elders with such disdain and dishonor? This is one of the big reasons I left hospital nursing after 15 years. I just got tired of trying to convince people they needed to have painful treatments done that they didn't really want.

  • Mar 1

    Yep you're gonna get flamed. I think you're confusing bullying and personality issues. I've been an RN for over 20 years and I've seldom met nurses who are just whining and don't have an actual concern about the way they have been treated. Certainly this happens, but nurses "eating their young" occurs much more frequently, and is a very clear and present form of bullying!

  • Mar 1

    Yes, get out of there! You have what is known as a hostile working environment, and you may be in very real danger. I very much appreciate those civil rights pioneers who risked their lives (and those who lost their lives) to further the cause of social equality, but your life may be in danger and no job is worth that!

  • Feb 10

    Yes, this is hospice nursing. In my case, with or without the actual verbal prayer, the care itself is unceasing prayer.

  • Aug 1 '15

    I am a hospice nurse and am also in an RN to BSN program. For my capstone I have requested to complete the requirements in a parish nurse program. This article speaks to exactly why I am going this direction. Thank you for sharing.

  • Aug 1 '15

    I am a hospice nurse and am also in an RN to BSN program. For my capstone I have requested to complete the requirements in a parish nurse program. This article speaks to exactly why I am going this direction. Thank you for sharing.

  • Aug 1 '15

    I am a hospice nurse and am also in an RN to BSN program. For my capstone I have requested to complete the requirements in a parish nurse program. This article speaks to exactly why I am going this direction. Thank you for sharing.


close
close