Latest Comments by studentnurserachel

Latest Comments by studentnurserachel

studentnurserachel 3,070 Views

Joined Aug 6, '05. Posts: 144 (10% Liked) Likes: 23

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  • 1
    brn99 likes this.

    I was in your shoes a year ago, NP and RN experience but no teaching except clinical and 1 class as adjunct. I would look up some information about teaching styles in nursing and be prepared to talk about it a little. I looked some things up and talked about learner-centered teaching but I also was open about the fact that my MSN did not have an education focus at all and that learner-centered teaching was something I was very interested in but I didn't have a lot of practical experience with (which worked because my University is very focused on this style). Learn as much as you can about the program before you go and if you have to do a teaching demo (as I think everyone does that goes through this process), practice a lot!

  • 0

    Just finished orientation week at the University that hired me to start this fall and am leaving it feeling utterly grateful to be a nurse, not for the first time. I am in a tenure-track 9 month position with decent (to me) pay with a MSN (FNP not nursing Ed). I do have to get my doctorate in the next 6 years to stand for tenure but at orientation I was surrounded by social sciences and physical sciences faculty. Many of them were coming in as 1 term or 1 year adjuncts with their PhD and teaching experience. You don't have a chance at a tenure track position in these disciplines even with your doctorate, and here I am with a MSN and 2 terms of adjunct as my only experience. I know that nursing tenure isn't easy to get everywhere in the country, but I am grateful to have this opportunity! P.S. PM me if you are interested: we will be posting at least 4 more tenure track positions for next fall start in the next couple months, SON ideally seeking doctorate prepared or working towards it.

  • 0

    I started my career at the Valley and was surprised to see them at a national conference this month recruiting nurses. They are hiring in all areas and even still actively hire new grads, so you should be fine.

  • 0

    I am an RN who had 1 yr of ICU and 5 yrs L&D experience which has been of minimal value as a FNP in primary care, I think inpatient experience matters more as ACNP or if you choose to work in acute care setting. I have worked with a few direct entry CNMs who were fantastic, I think they were even more controversial because so many people think midwives ought to have L&D experience.

  • 0

    Honestly? PA, especially if you think you might want to do ER. My husband is a PA, I'm a FNP, my training was very good for primary care, I would be a fish out of water in the ER. I do like the more holistic approach of nursing vs medical model, but I think that varies by program and what the person brings to it, because while my husband is very much in line with the medical model, I work with a PA who is probably more holistic than me.

  • 0

    Are you working in FP or endocrinology? My experience with this is that if someone is symptomatic, or seems to be, endo will medicate at TSH levels that are high normal on lab range, where FP probably wouldn't, I think there are different reference ranges depending on the lab, my current lab normal range is about what you said, 0.5-4.5, and personally, I don't consider thyroid replacement unless they are out of that range.

  • 0

    Anyone enrolled in DNP program and doing NFLP with extra education classes? What schools? Online? Seems these programs are a little hard to find, easier for PhD (although not online for PhD so much)

    I am a FNP now, want to continue clinical practice full time for now and move into teaching with part-time clinical practice so I *think* DNP is the way to go, but am interested in NFLP to fund my education. Where I live, there are lots of teaching opportunities in the smaller universities (not the big research ones in the state, second tier state schools) for DNPs.

    I am torn, as it seems many are on this forum and others, about whether or not to just go for the PhD if my ultimate goal is teaching, but I sort of don't want to spend an extra 1.5-3 years in school beyond the 1.5-3 years it will take me to earn the DNP. And if I'm being honest, I'm a little scared of a dissertation and years of research leading up to it.

  • 0

    Really enjoying this thread. My formulary is limited by state restrictions as well as by my "collaborating" physician. I really hated these artificial restrictions at first, but to be honest, I don't mind them so much anymore, 1 day each week I work in a clinic that sees the patients that no one else will see with the county health plan or self-pay or already discharged from every other practice. These hard and fast rules make things easier for me because I don't have to make those judgment calls. My clinic does not do opiates for chronic pain at all, any type of chronic pain. I don't do ADHD drugs for adults (and all the kids go to a specialist anyway). It does mean I have to put away my empathy when I work in that clinic, for the first several months I came home every day feeling so bad that I couldn't help people with real pain problems or mad at all the scammers for hounding me for something I couldn't do, now I go home knowing I am doing the best I can for them and I mostly can shrug off the feelings.

    By my own choice, I do not do Adipex or anything like it for weight loss, I have never asked if it would be a problem, but I just won't do it, think it's a crock (and I find ridiculous that my patients who won't scrape together their $5 sliding scale fee to see me will scrape together the money for a weight loss miracle drug, but that is another topic for another day).

  • 0

    I have a telephone interview for a tenure-track nursing faculty position. My teaching experience to date is limited to 1 didactic med-surg course and 1 clinical med surg course at a community college. I don't think I have a great chance to actually get the position as a doctorate is preferred, and I only just applied for DNP programs in the last month, but I do want to have a good interview, so would love some tips and ideas, if anyone has any, about what type of questions to expect. Are faculty interviews like normal job interviews or should I expect specific teaching philosophy questions and stuff? Thanks in advance!

  • 2
    MandaRN94 and elkpark like this.

    Agree with above posters, when I was in ADN school I just knew I was going to be a CRNA, until I slogged out my year in ICU and actually saw the work CRNAs did (no offense, just doesn't interest me, even for all the money), then I was in labor and delivery and just knew I was going to be a midwife until my practical nature got in the way and I switched directions and became a family nurse practitioner. Just saying, as others have said above, focus most of your energy on getting to your 1-2 year goals, all your possible goals require you to have good grades and get that first job, which depending on where you live, might not be the easiest of obstacles. Above poster was right saying there is nothing wrong with long-range planning, but I think in your first few years of nursing, those goals need to be a little flexible.

  • 1
    elkpark likes this.

    I think BlueDevil and other early posters were giving a realistic response. Let's be real here, OP is in an unfortunate situation, albeit of her own making, but why waste the time to do this if there is no realistic chance of employment? I guess she could try to get answers from the BON and DEA, but if it's anything like the BON in the states I have worked in, she won't get a straight answer. She could probably get some school to admit her with enough effort, but credentialing I think is a bridge too far. I was frankly shocked by the mountain of paperwork I had to fill out to get credentialed at my facility, and that was without admitting privileges and in a state that significantly restricts NP practice anyway. I also had to file supporting paperwork for "discrepancies" in my credentialing file resulting from address changes (husband in the military). I just don't think any credentialing board, or hospital/group malpractice company is going to accept that risk. It is remarkable to have a job (and a license) at all after diversion, don't think NP is a realistic goal.

  • 2
    AtomicWoman and Dembitz like this.

    I work primarily in an adolescent health clinic and since we really don't have any other reason to do a pelvic now unless they are having pain or funky discharge (no paps until 21), we do urine tests. I think the important thing is to remember that they cannot have peed for an hour prior and it must be a "dirty" vs clean catch. The statistics are pretty good on the urine test for detection if those parameters are met, and anecdotally, the urine test has been highly effective at finding the ridiculous numbers of chlamydia I have seen in the last couple months!

    That said, if someone is coming in for a problem, and I am doing a pelvic anyway, I collect the sample that way because of the slight increase in detection rate.

  • 0

    This is a little off topic for where the thread has gone most recently, but back to the original idea, there is a pecking order for MDs/DOs too (actually don't all MDs pretty much think they are better than all DOs?) and between specialties, I have heard many a FP physician lament the lack of respect/pay they receive.

    I think this NP vs PA thing is ridiculous. My husband is a PA, and wonderful at his job. I am amazed at the breadth of his knowledge and his comfort working in a rural ER without a physician readily at hand (only available by telephone). Although I am supposed to be more independent, I wouldn't feel comfortable in his role, although there are probably plenty of NPs that would. My state gives NPs and PAs equally limited rights to practice and in fact the NP role is not legislatively defined and some physician advocacy groups in the state have suggested that NPs are practicing completely illegally even when bound up with all the regulations, collaborative practice agreements, etc.

    As others said earlier on this thread, I don't think tearing down and belittling the PA profession builds us up in any way.

    And to the previous poster who disseminated false information earlier, the Army PA program is a Masters program and has been for at least 6 years.

  • 0

    Interesting the direction this thread has gone. I would have welcomed a residency after graduation. I didn't (and perhaps still don't) feel as prepared as my husband was when he was fresh out of PA school (Army medic to Army PA school). My husband was also certainly better prepared to go into a specialty, particularly if he wanted to do one of the IM specialties, and is doing very well in the ER now, which absolutely petrifies me as a FNP. I think I could have had more clinical hours and perhaps higher quality clinical hours. Now that I am in practice though, I don't feel unprepared for what I do most days, although I am in pretty basic primary care. Things still come my way that have me digging through uptodate and calling for help, but that happens a little bit less every month.

    I feel like programs should be standardized more than they are, but this whole bagging on the online degree thing has been done ad nauseum on this board as well as many others. It feels a little bit like people just clinging to the old ways for the sake of tradition. How about programs be held to higher standards whether or not the content is delivered online? I have heard people on this board and in my day to day life who have complained equally about the bricks and mortar schools. I am certainly prejudiced as a FNU graduate (by the way, they didn't beat down my door and call me endlessly, I had to do the legwork, so don't really understand that reference), but I feel like there has to be a place for online schools if NPs are to be a part of the solution to the PCP shortage. I would not be an NP but for online education. We moved to 3 different states in my 3 years completing the program and that was not without difficulties even in an online environment, would have been impossible at a B&M school.

    I also agree with others that it is difficult to explain what an NP is to laypeople and even doctors, MAs, etc., but I remain proud that I am a NURSE first and would never voluntarily lose that part of my title. As the number of NPs swells across the country, hopefully that awkward explanation will occur less frequently. I like to think this is what the DOs went through (and still go through to an extent!) when explaining the letters behind their name. Since my husband is a PA I can also tell you on good authority that PAs absolutely agonize over their title as "Physician Assistant" because they get mistaken for MAs, CNAs, or secretaries, many in the profession want to change the title to Physician Associate and have even drafted motions for their national association to that effect.

  • 0

    I received my first payment on 9/19 (same start day and deposit as tgonzalez) but no payment this month even though the rep told me to expect payments roughly every 30 days after the initial payment went through. Good thing I had extra money sitting in my account since I went ahead and set up an automatic payment on my loans. So for those still waiting, even when you get it, be cautious about expecting it will come at the same time each month.


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