Latest Comments by bebbercorn

Latest Comments by bebbercorn

bebbercorn, BSN (6,168 Views)

"Raise your words, not voice. It is rain that grows flowers, not thunder." ― Rumi

Sorted By Last Comment (Past 5 Years)
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  • 0

    I wonder what the compensation will be... often the residency programs aren't paid enough to consider, unfortunately, although I'd love to do one when I finish next year. This one looks like one to look into...

  • 8

    A well trained provider with a low risk mother can make for a safe environment for a home birth. That being said, as with anything in life, things can take a turn for the worst, that is why there are generally considerations in place... how close are we to the hospital? what is the providers transfer rate? for what reasons has the provider transferred? how is their relationship with the transferring facility, do they work with any providers at the hospital with whom they can communicate in the event of an unplanned transfer?

    Most people don't realize that midwives do carry emergency equipment with them and can resuscitate if need be. It is not as fast as being at a hospital, this is true. But as far as I understand it, many "emergency c's" that women have been on oxytocin and epidurals which may/may not have precipitated the need for the c. Undoubtedly, this won't be occurring at a home birth.

    I've seen my share of home births (mom was a midwife), and as an ED nurse I've seen/heard of some that have gone wrong. But these have been: a woman who had a midwife refuse to deliver her at home because she was a first time breech... unassisted because of concerns because mom was on rx painkillers... meconium staining, family asked to transfer and the midwife brushed it off. All different problems. All could have had very different outcomes. We know that worldwide home births are working, right now we just don't have the kinks work out of the system to have the best of outcomes. We can and should do better. The c-section and induction rates in this country are atrocious.

  • 2

    Our policy is to send a written report and call in 15 minutes to tell them that they are coming. The responsibility lies on the floor nurse to call with questions. I usually try to call and catch the nurse to make sure there are no questions. This can be somewhat repetitive and wastes time because I get questions that are clearly on the SBAR. However, most of the time it facilitates a positive relationship that ultimately benefits the patient. There will always be the 3% that are looking for a way to keep the pt in the ED, and likewise on our side the 3% who are sending the pt up before completed orders or ensuring full safety. The verbal can be a lifesaver in these instances.

  • 0

    When I first started, I got six months of training in a critical care fellowship. It was a strong program. One hospital I worked at had a year long program for ED and their graduates were very strong. My current facility gives 12 weeks, which is not long enough, by a long shot. We lose a lot of people with potential because they just needed a little more time.

  • 2
    SororAKS and autonomyforall like this.

    I have seen some docs like the ones you mentioned, but we work with an NP who is very well respected in our ED. It really depends on the doc you ask and the NP's they have interacted with. Funnily enough, across the country in hospitals I have worked, certain specialties seem to use NPs, and certain ones PAs. For example, I have almost always had NPs on the cardiac services and PAs on neuro. But I digress...

  • 0

    If I could start again, I'd be an MD... but stay in Emergency. I do love my job, but I agree with PP about a terminal MD where I'd be allowed to call myself by the title Dr. that I earned.

  • 1
    Farawyn likes this.

    Yes, very true for this age group (and the melodramatic of all ages). Don't ask the pt each of these, ask them to describe it to you. "What do you mean by, 'feeling dizzy?'" That's how I get around it. The more vague the description, the more likely it's nothing to worry about, imho.

  • 1
    nurseactivist likes this.

    As a mom who has done plenty of peds, I have collected the saddest of stories. I can tell you it will get to you sometimes. Then again, there are plenty of adults that have gotten me, too. I don't think it has made me any more paranoid but it has changed a little how I handle complaints (like, jump up and down if your belly hurts for appendicitis check). I make sure they are strapped in tightly, and I tell parents to bolt their flat screen TV's. It is hard when you have a loss close to your kids age, but being there for the parents is a reward in itself. There are days when all you can do is hug your kids extra tight and feel grateful for what you have. I vote for following your heart.

  • 0

    I read they go from the highest tier down, selecting those with the highest debt/income ratio. I am in the same boat as PP, with a huge debt/income ratio. For that reason, I'm only looking at sites with 18 or higher. Here's hoping.

  • 8

    If I can't control my bodily fluids, I stay home.

  • 0

    I worked abroad for several years, and didn't get apprehensive for the first time until I got on the plane! Cried like a baby... and quickly got over it as soon as I got there. Loved being abroad, but I didn't really get homesick. I went home once in a few years, and once my sisters came. That helped. Bur make sure you really want to go, first!

  • 0

    My new facility is the first one where we are allowed (as RNs) to do art sticks. I'm still getting the hang of it... (Hey, RT, while you're in there...) But I have always been expected to be able to interpret the results.

  • 3
    Rocknurse, imintrouble, and Muser69 like this.

    I wonder how long this will last after charge and ANM see how often they will have to have meetings with "offenders." (rolls eyes)

  • 9
    imintrouble, LvnBre, KatieMI, and 6 others like this.

    Just because something isn't my cup of tea doesn't mean I look down on it.


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