Latest Comments by bebbercorn

Latest Comments by bebbercorn

bebbercorn, BSN 6,837 Views

"Raise your words, not voice. It is rain that grows flowers, not thunder." ― Rumi

Sorted By Last Comment (Past 5 Years)
  • 0

    Once upon a time did nursing in Tampa and I really liked it compared to Orlando, not as spread out, close to great beaches, nice parks... Downtown is not as happening as Orlando, but Orlando is SO touristy. Can't speak for pay.

  • 2
    Emergent and Nurse Leigh like this.

    Some of these have been mentioned, but...

    Anytime someone shocks systole...

    Anytime someone uses paddles to defibrillate...

    Anytime an MD passes meds...

    Anytime an MD ambulates a patient...

    The ET tube at 7 cm at the lip... (like can't you CUT it or something geeeeez!)

    In nurse Jackie where she got all those lunch breaks (whaaaat?)

    When medical conditions are mispronounced, I remember someone saying "hypokalemic" wrong once and it still bothers me...

    There are more I'm forgetting. Now I have to go watch Scrubs to redeem the medical profession.

  • 4

    Staffing, also, they are perpetually hiring new grads on our unit. Which is great, but they have yet to replace half a dozen experienced nurses that left with anyone with, well, experience...!

    I second the patient satisfaction scores... we are going completely the wrong way with fixing healthcare.

    The clogging of the emergency department with more and more and MORE non-emergent cases. Every year it is getting worse. (Or I'm getting less tolerant)

  • 3
    kalycat, Altra, and Farawyn like this.

    Typically, that results in the "Jets/Sharks" choreography from West Side Story. Never have I ever been a situation where that didn't work

  • 1
    melmarie23 likes this.

    Ugh ^^ that article is by Amy Tuteur, queen of "an OB has to attend the birth for it to be safe." Although this article is toned down from her normal and does address that CNMs are often better prepared than direct entry midwives, she is such a fear mongerer I just can't take her seriously. She makes my teeth start grinding on autopilot.

  • 0

    Anders, one of my favorite professors did this. It was completely optional, but you could do a "visit" with her, where she would give you VS, pertinent history, and chief complaint, then go from there. I loved this learning method and it was so helpful. She had a ton of experience as an NP and was one of those who really facilitated learning. We need more of those!

  • 3

    Depends on the patient. I have had the most awesome, resilient, 100 year old women, and the whiniest, neediest of elderly males, and vice versa. I will not hold someone against a weak bladder, lest I be held accountable for mine in old age. I agree with PP that some attitudes displayed here may interfere with looking at this issue with a balanced eye... if you think old women are needy and worse than their male counterparts when delirious, guess which of your experiences with them is likely stick to your memory?

  • 1
    NotAllWhoWandeRN likes this.

    They are continued without discretion by a LOT of providers, and as many are OTC people assume they are safe, despite more and more documented risks with long term use...

    Medscape: Medscape Access

    "If they sell it over the counter, it must be safe..."

    Riiiiiiight.

  • 0

    I did the whole exam book and listened to the lectures by Mark Boswell on youtube. I did feel a little strange just doing the exams, but thoroughly understand the rationale, and if you don't, look it up. It's a great guide and a fairly accurate representation of what the test was like. When I hit submit, I was convinced I had failed, but passed with a good score. Good luck!

  • 2
    uniquenurse2014 and azureblue like this.

    Quote from IsabelK
    I precept. I don't like to precept first semester clinical students because they don't have enough internal medicine knowledge to make the leap to geriatrics. What I find is that I get NP students coming through who have the book knowledge the school gives them about prescribing, labs, etc, but that previous preceptors many times don't let them practice working with any of it. Physical exam skills tend to be good, but the actual "exam, then do" is lacking. When my students are there I make them sit with labs and med lists and diagnoses and tell them to "figure it out". Generally that starts with them talking through it with me and as the rotation goes on it's them coming to me with assessments and plans, including meds, future labs, and reasons why. I won't take "it's the guideline". Ok, nice, but why??? I also let them practice writing prescriptions for everything from PT/OT (I work in LTC) to actually writing the controlled substance scripts. Since the facility still uses paper, they have to think and can't rely on an EMR to populate meds. This means they have to know how to look up dosing guidelines. This is from a school that does weed out people (I've had students set up to come to clinical and then be told they're not coming because they failed a mock physical exam with SOAP note, failed a written exam, etc).
    You sound like an amazing preceptor!

  • 0

    D/C'ing an accessed port from a 5 year old... we just stared at each other like "That sucked for both of us."

  • 1
    brownbook likes this.

    You are psyching yourself out! Did you get every neonatal IV you started right away? I know I didn't... Give yourself 3 more sticks and you will be golden. I had to re-orient to new angiocaths in our new facility, and I am really comfortable with IV's across age groups. You have the concept, just let yourself get the tactile learning in. Hang in there!

  • 4
    canoehead, Nurse Leigh, MsPebbles, and 1 other like this.

    Don't know you, doc, but I love ya.

  • 0
  • 0

    Agreed with above... I have less beef with you going to a 'for profit' school than going for your LPN. Not because I don't respect LPNs, but because of school issues you will have later, and there not being as many jobs available...


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