Latest Comments by lhflanurseNP

Latest Comments by lhflanurseNP

lhflanurseNP, MSN, NP 9,905 Views

Joined Jan 6, '13. Posts: 594 (41% Liked) Likes: 452

Sorted By Last Comment (Past 5 Years)
  • 2
    MassED and AndyB like this.

    Quote from MunoRN
    The subsidies to help buy insurance are pretty generous, the average amount paid for an individual is $84/month, and subsidies are available up to 400% of the poverty line, which means a family of 4 making up to $97k will get a subsidy, how much higher do you feel it should go?
    So, this sounds GREAT if you have a family of 4. What about the 40+ group that no longer has family at home and has a combined income of $65K. You do not qualify for the subsidy. If the income is greater than $63K, you do not qualify for any reimbursement and the "cheapest" plan is $600.00 pp/month.

  • 3
    Spidey's mom, AndyB, and MassED like this.

    I for one would like to see an overhaul of the current healthcare program. People who had good insurance prior to ACA, are now paying 2-3 times a month for premiums and having higher deductibles and less coverage...or opting to not to have any insurance and "taking a risk" because it's cheaper! I had really good insurance and then received a notice that my plan would no longer be available and had to select a new one. Well, the new one that would have "mirrored" my old plan was 3 times the cost so I opted for 1 that I could "afford". Luckily I did because we were hit with an unfortunate health condition this year and would have wound up paying more if we did not have the insurance. I know several people who don't have insurance because a) the make more than the schedule to get credit and b) they don't make enough to pay the monthly premiums along with the general cost of living. We live in a predominately older community and have one of the highest rates for insurance in the state! This is sooooooooooooo wrong.

  • 0

    If you look at your state's np association affiliated with AANP, you should find a preceptor list.

  • 0

    I'm confused, but not being from MA - maybe that's the way it is. Most states will supply your license upon completion of your national board (AANP or ANCC) for "certification", and applying to the State Board of Nursing. Other credentialing bodies provide a place for you to have all your information in one place for insurance carriers, etc. to utilize, or give you additional documentation for specialty NP practice.

  • 0

    Women's Health should provide you with a unique opportunity to work in a regular office seeing adult patients! Many of the females bounce between a primary care provider and a gynecologist and I have found they really enjoy being able to have just 1 practitioner who can do both. Any obstetrics goes to the OB/GYN, otherwise, women's health provides standards of care that are women driven. I would consider looking into the clinic setting bringing your expertise to the practice. Good luck!

  • 3

    Ah...to be young again and have the opportunities for higher education. I started in 1974 and finished my final degree in 2014.

  • 0

    DixieDarlin. From my understanding, RIBN is a new program that is basically you get an ADN degree then continue towards your BSN. CF offers an ADN degree as well as a RN-to-BSN bridge as well so kind of the same.

  • 0

    A patient in severe Hashimoto's hypothyroidism can develop tachycardia as a results of either/both extremely decreased free T3 or the histamine response associated with elevated TPO/TG antibodies. Do some research...you will find the thyroid quite an interesting gland

  • 1
    chare likes this.

    I may be out of turn, but I do believe schools will require that you have an active RN license to be in classes...especillay if you are going for your NP.

  • 0
    In EHR

    You might look at PracticeFusion. It is a "free" program, but in that...you do not have a billing/software program. They have several companies that you can link with and they come in varying prices and services. The charting software is decent and allows you to link to labs and some diagnostic centers. I do not use it now, but I found it very beneficial as a starting software. I now have access to eClinicalWorks which has a VERY large base in my area.

  • 0

    As with WKShadowRN, I was up to 20 patients on my final rotations as well. As a practicing NP, it is not uncommon to see that number either!. As ndnursepract points out, many patients will be 15 minutes...especially once you have established a working relationship and get to know the patients better.

  • 0

    Why do you want to be a NP? What is the drive? I read all kinds of "accolades", but no passion for why you want to become a NP...or maybe I am missing it. If so...so are the recruiters.

  • 1
    jesstatic likes this.

    Basic review of pharmacology is helpful as is physiology. Both of these are going to be the ground floor for building.

  • 0

    I am not a "guy", but I do know people who have worked in child services - the law enforcement side, and it is really hard! One person I know had a 4 county territory and would be called at all different times of the day/night/weekends/holidays...weekends and holidays being the worst, having to put on all the gear and go on a call. THEN having to arrange to meet a judge who would be willing to leave his/her family/engagements to meet and sign off papers for the child to be removed from a setting or to have a parent arrested. This person was spit on, beaten, thrown down stairs, etc. Has retired after the 2nd broken neck and needing surgery. I think your goal of pediatric neurology is wonderful just as long as you understand there will most likely be more pitfalls than successes. Good luck in whichever path you ultimately choose.

  • 0

    If the billing is being done through the NP independendently that is fine...it is your license.


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