Latest Likes For lhflanurseNP

lhflanurseNP, MSN, NP 11,032 Views

Joined Jan 6, '13. Posts: 637 (41% Liked) Likes: 508

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  • Jan 18

    OP, the fact that you question your "ability" is admirable! No one fresh out of school knows/experienced everything whether you are a nurse, nurse practitioner, physician, teacher, lawyer...the list goes on. School provides the bare minimum to pass the boards associated with the degree. You actual learning begins in your clinical rotations as well as your first few years of practice. I am always leary when someone "knows it all" during, right after, and even with experience. Medicine is constantly changing...no one can know everything! You will do just fine!

  • Jan 17

    OP, the fact that you question your "ability" is admirable! No one fresh out of school knows/experienced everything whether you are a nurse, nurse practitioner, physician, teacher, lawyer...the list goes on. School provides the bare minimum to pass the boards associated with the degree. You actual learning begins in your clinical rotations as well as your first few years of practice. I am always leary when someone "knows it all" during, right after, and even with experience. Medicine is constantly changing...no one can know everything! You will do just fine!

  • Jan 17

    OP, the fact that you question your "ability" is admirable! No one fresh out of school knows/experienced everything whether you are a nurse, nurse practitioner, physician, teacher, lawyer...the list goes on. School provides the bare minimum to pass the boards associated with the degree. You actual learning begins in your clinical rotations as well as your first few years of practice. I am always leary when someone "knows it all" during, right after, and even with experience. Medicine is constantly changing...no one can know everything! You will do just fine!

  • Jan 17

    OP, the fact that you question your "ability" is admirable! No one fresh out of school knows/experienced everything whether you are a nurse, nurse practitioner, physician, teacher, lawyer...the list goes on. School provides the bare minimum to pass the boards associated with the degree. You actual learning begins in your clinical rotations as well as your first few years of practice. I am always leary when someone "knows it all" during, right after, and even with experience. Medicine is constantly changing...no one can know everything! You will do just fine!

  • Jan 17

    OP, the fact that you question your "ability" is admirable! No one fresh out of school knows/experienced everything whether you are a nurse, nurse practitioner, physician, teacher, lawyer...the list goes on. School provides the bare minimum to pass the boards associated with the degree. You actual learning begins in your clinical rotations as well as your first few years of practice. I am always leary when someone "knows it all" during, right after, and even with experience. Medicine is constantly changing...no one can know everything! You will do just fine!

  • Jan 17

    OP, the fact that you question your "ability" is admirable! No one fresh out of school knows/experienced everything whether you are a nurse, nurse practitioner, physician, teacher, lawyer...the list goes on. School provides the bare minimum to pass the boards associated with the degree. You actual learning begins in your clinical rotations as well as your first few years of practice. I am always leary when someone "knows it all" during, right after, and even with experience. Medicine is constantly changing...no one can know everything! You will do just fine!

  • Jan 16

    OP, the fact that you question your "ability" is admirable! No one fresh out of school knows/experienced everything whether you are a nurse, nurse practitioner, physician, teacher, lawyer...the list goes on. School provides the bare minimum to pass the boards associated with the degree. You actual learning begins in your clinical rotations as well as your first few years of practice. I am always leary when someone "knows it all" during, right after, and even with experience. Medicine is constantly changing...no one can know everything! You will do just fine!

  • Jan 16

    OP, the fact that you question your "ability" is admirable! No one fresh out of school knows/experienced everything whether you are a nurse, nurse practitioner, physician, teacher, lawyer...the list goes on. School provides the bare minimum to pass the boards associated with the degree. You actual learning begins in your clinical rotations as well as your first few years of practice. I am always leary when someone "knows it all" during, right after, and even with experience. Medicine is constantly changing...no one can know everything! You will do just fine!

  • Jan 16

    As per Jules...get it if you can. It is not cheap, but if you can swing the $731.00, it is nice to have. You just have to update your work area as necessary.

  • Jan 16

    OP, the fact that you question your "ability" is admirable! No one fresh out of school knows/experienced everything whether you are a nurse, nurse practitioner, physician, teacher, lawyer...the list goes on. School provides the bare minimum to pass the boards associated with the degree. You actual learning begins in your clinical rotations as well as your first few years of practice. I am always leary when someone "knows it all" during, right after, and even with experience. Medicine is constantly changing...no one can know everything! You will do just fine!

  • Jan 16

    OP, the fact that you question your "ability" is admirable! No one fresh out of school knows/experienced everything whether you are a nurse, nurse practitioner, physician, teacher, lawyer...the list goes on. School provides the bare minimum to pass the boards associated with the degree. You actual learning begins in your clinical rotations as well as your first few years of practice. I am always leary when someone "knows it all" during, right after, and even with experience. Medicine is constantly changing...no one can know everything! You will do just fine!

  • Jan 16

    As per Jules...get it if you can. It is not cheap, but if you can swing the $731.00, it is nice to have. You just have to update your work area as necessary.

  • Jan 13

    Not only did I appreciate everything I learned from LPNs while a student nurse (many moons ago)...I learned even more as a "new nurse". LPNs are definitely nurses in my book!

  • Jan 2

    One thing that can help is doing as much clinical time as you can. Just doing the "minimum" hours doesn't cut it. The problem most NP students have is they still have to work so they wind up shortchanging themselves in regards to the clinical practicum hours. This is where you will learn the most...well...hopefully if you have good preceptors/mentors. I try to get my students to get more involved in the clinical rotations...I even do "projects" in which they need to research an actual patient scenario and come up with how they would evaluate, diagnose, and follow the patient. I cannot tell you how many times the answers are typical "nursing"...vital signs, oxygen, diet, some even tell me "what ever the physician orders". One of my pet peeves why NP students need more experience under their belts and be in positions where they have actually had to do critical thinking. Something to consider is while working as a nurse...look at your patient and consider what would you order? why? what about follow-up outside the critical setting?

  • Dec 30 '16

    Quote from AndersRN
    On the contrary, I believe FL is the best place for APN to work. The original intent of APN was to be physicians extender. APN training is inadequate; therefore, close supervision is needed as way to prevent them from harming patients... That supposedly 'supervision' is still very lax in FL.
    Without knowing the extent of education and licensure, how can you make this blanket statement? Nurse practitioners have consistently been found to provide AS EQUAL care as any primary care practitioner. The role of the nurse practitioner is NOT to be a "physician extender", but to provide a service need as a primary care practitioner in the field. The fact the nurse practitioners are now focusing on acute care areas is a testament to the growing need and effectiveness nurse practitioners are providing. Twenty-two states and the District of Columbia offer full autonomy to nurse practitioners so your blanket statement is an affront to nurse practitioners, shows your lack of knowledge, and unfortunately shows how nurses do not understand the role of the nurse practitioner. Are there poor performing nurse practitioners? Sure...but what about "bad doctors".


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