Latest Likes For lhflanurseNP

lhflanurseNP, MSN, NP 13,882 Views

Joined Jan 6, '13. Posts: 714 (42% Liked) Likes: 624

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  • Oct 15

    The reason you need to be a nurse before being a NP, is the course is shorter than that for PA. As PAs have little to no experience, they have to learn EVERYTHING. The idea behind the NP is that it is an advanced nursing role...builds on what you have already learned. Hope this helps.

  • Oct 15

    I was told that my first year of college...now look at me. A full career in nursing and now a nurse practitioner. If it is truly what you want, you will get there.

  • Oct 14

    I too went to SU online, passed my boards on first attempt, and started work as soon as I got my license changed as well.

  • Oct 13

    Quote from bell1962
    Just remembered something. We had to mix our own Chemo under a hood on a medical floor!
    Remember the wrap around "apron" and the black neoprene rubber gloves that went to your elbows? At least I did mixing chemo.

  • Oct 12

    The reason you need to be a nurse before being a NP, is the course is shorter than that for PA. As PAs have little to no experience, they have to learn EVERYTHING. The idea behind the NP is that it is an advanced nursing role...builds on what you have already learned. Hope this helps.

  • Oct 10

    The reason you need to be a nurse before being a NP, is the course is shorter than that for PA. As PAs have little to no experience, they have to learn EVERYTHING. The idea behind the NP is that it is an advanced nursing role...builds on what you have already learned. Hope this helps.

  • Oct 8

    You did the right thing. I "assume" your co-workers learned of this from the nurse in question. You don't have a clue what she may have told them, but either way it does put you on the spot. You have nothing to be ashamed about. If anyone asks, suggest they talk to the nurse manager and say nothing more. More nurses need to take responsibility for patients and notify administration of non-safe practices. Good luck in your new posting.

  • Oct 7

    You did the right thing. I "assume" your co-workers learned of this from the nurse in question. You don't have a clue what she may have told them, but either way it does put you on the spot. You have nothing to be ashamed about. If anyone asks, suggest they talk to the nurse manager and say nothing more. More nurses need to take responsibility for patients and notify administration of non-safe practices. Good luck in your new posting.

  • Oct 4

    I was told that my first year of college...now look at me. A full career in nursing and now a nurse practitioner. If it is truly what you want, you will get there.

  • Oct 4

    I was told that my first year of college...now look at me. A full career in nursing and now a nurse practitioner. If it is truly what you want, you will get there.

  • Oct 1

    I was told that my first year of college...now look at me. A full career in nursing and now a nurse practitioner. If it is truly what you want, you will get there.

  • Sep 12

    It "seems" that your cohort is looking to develop a "bond". She may be very insecure and sees you as a mentor but is approaching things the wrong way. She may not feel that she was "cheating", but making sure that she would do well in the test...maybe she is a poor test taker and the anxiety led her to make a poor decision. Maybe by letting you know she was seeking support. Either way, I believe you need to set some boundaries and by all means, if you want your own permit...get one.

  • Sep 4

    It "seems" that your cohort is looking to develop a "bond". She may be very insecure and sees you as a mentor but is approaching things the wrong way. She may not feel that she was "cheating", but making sure that she would do well in the test...maybe she is a poor test taker and the anxiety led her to make a poor decision. Maybe by letting you know she was seeking support. Either way, I believe you need to set some boundaries and by all means, if you want your own permit...get one.

  • Aug 23

    I have to disagree with PP. The school you choose should be one that fits into your needs. For me, the flexibility, travel requirements, and cost of South outweighed Graceland, Maryville, and Georgetown. The courses may have a slight twist at different schools, but an accredited school must offer the same classes.

  • Aug 16

    You do not mention how long you have worked there nor your patient base. Do you see repetitive patients or do you work as a group (first come first serve). This could have a bearing on length of time. If you have your own patient base, and it is extensive, 2 weeks may not be enough time to "spread" your patients throughout the practice.


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