Latest Likes For lhflanurseNP

Latest Likes For lhflanurseNP

lhflanurseNP, MSN, NP 9,736 Views

Joined Jan 6, '13. Posts: 587 (41% Liked) Likes: 443

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  • Jul 24

    I may be out of turn, but I do believe schools will require that you have an active RN license to be in classes...especillay if you are going for your NP.

  • Jul 12

    Basic review of pharmacology is helpful as is physiology. Both of these are going to be the ground floor for building.

  • Jul 11

    I am sure the relevance is that it exposes you to another aspect of alternative medicine that patients may use. Homeopathy is not mixing this herb with that herb, but rather the energy or "essence" of the product. The lower the number, the more "concentrated". When working with a patient who uses homeopathy, it is wise to have some real knowledge of the practice so as not to antagonize the patient because they are trying "something different".

  • Jul 10

    I am sure the relevance is that it exposes you to another aspect of alternative medicine that patients may use. Homeopathy is not mixing this herb with that herb, but rather the energy or "essence" of the product. The lower the number, the more "concentrated". When working with a patient who uses homeopathy, it is wise to have some real knowledge of the practice so as not to antagonize the patient because they are trying "something different".

  • Jun 30

    I am sure the relevance is that it exposes you to another aspect of alternative medicine that patients may use. Homeopathy is not mixing this herb with that herb, but rather the energy or "essence" of the product. The lower the number, the more "concentrated". When working with a patient who uses homeopathy, it is wise to have some real knowledge of the practice so as not to antagonize the patient because they are trying "something different".

  • Jun 29

    I am sure the relevance is that it exposes you to another aspect of alternative medicine that patients may use. Homeopathy is not mixing this herb with that herb, but rather the energy or "essence" of the product. The lower the number, the more "concentrated". When working with a patient who uses homeopathy, it is wise to have some real knowledge of the practice so as not to antagonize the patient because they are trying "something different".

  • Jun 9

    I utilize integrative medicine in my practice all the time. It is what it means...it integrates aspects of allopathic AND complementary practices. It opens the doors to looking "outside the box" for those patients who allopathic medicine has failed. As nurse practitioners, our focus is on the whole patient. While going to school, I had the unexpected pleasure of being able to suggest alternative treatment options I would offer along with traditional approaches as long as there was evidence to support my options. The main problem to consider is the boards are written in a more traditional allopathic approach. My suggestion...get your schooling done THEN consider taking additional classes as well as finding integrative practitioners to approach. Many of the major nutraceutical companies provide information and help bridge the gap.

  • Jun 4

    I'm going to stick my neck out...The majority of clinical practices work Monday through Friday daytime. The important thing to remember is this is like an internship...this is where you REALLY learn about evaluation, assessment, diagnosis, and planning. To "short change" yourself and choose a school because it has fewer clinical hour requirements can do more harm than good. Some schools count the time spent in the clinic while other programs count actual patient time. The more patient time you can get, the more you learn. The more you learn, the more you can pull not only in taking the certification exam, but also in practice. Throughout my clinicals, it was not uncommon for me to have nearly 100 more hours than required. I understand many nurses must work while going to NP school, but the goal is to become a NP, and one should strive to be a GOOD NP. Just my 2-cents worth.

  • Jun 4

    I'm going to stick my neck out...The majority of clinical practices work Monday through Friday daytime. The important thing to remember is this is like an internship...this is where you REALLY learn about evaluation, assessment, diagnosis, and planning. To "short change" yourself and choose a school because it has fewer clinical hour requirements can do more harm than good. Some schools count the time spent in the clinic while other programs count actual patient time. The more patient time you can get, the more you learn. The more you learn, the more you can pull not only in taking the certification exam, but also in practice. Throughout my clinicals, it was not uncommon for me to have nearly 100 more hours than required. I understand many nurses must work while going to NP school, but the goal is to become a NP, and one should strive to be a GOOD NP. Just my 2-cents worth.

  • May 30

    There is a need for both. I believe the "all-inclusive" MSN-APN title adds to the confusion and why there is a push for the DNP title to help separate clinical vs. non-clinical advanced nurse practitioners.

  • May 25

    Cwoods...South has campuses as well as online programs. I am not real familiar with the campus programs. The online program is intense, and has a LOT of papers and assignments. You have to be pretty much your own driving force. That said, I have made some good "friends" throughout the journey and we communicate with each other even outside of the program. I started out in the FNP program but switched to ANP half-way through the Advanced History and Assessment class. The hardest part of the program is obtaining your preceptors and sites, but if you have a good network set up it shouldn't be too difficult. As to funds, my first year was a little over 15K, and my balance for the program is just a tad over 11K (figures will be higher now because of the change in credit hour charge). I am more than happy to talk to you about my experiences and you can email me at lhflanurse@gmail.com

  • May 18

    Congratulations. As you have most likely read, Leik and Hollier have great reviews as does Barkley. Good luck! The key is not to memorize the questions, but understand the physiology in order to find the correct answer. Utilize all you have learned during your rotations as well!

  • May 18

    Quote from AndersRN
    On the contrary, I believe FL is the best place for APN to work. The original intent of APN was to be physicians extender. APN training is inadequate; therefore, close supervision is needed as way to prevent them from harming patients... That supposedly 'supervision' is still very lax in FL.
    Without knowing the extent of education and licensure, how can you make this blanket statement? Nurse practitioners have consistently been found to provide AS EQUAL care as any primary care practitioner. The role of the nurse practitioner is NOT to be a "physician extender", but to provide a service need as a primary care practitioner in the field. The fact the nurse practitioners are now focusing on acute care areas is a testament to the growing need and effectiveness nurse practitioners are providing. Twenty-two states and the District of Columbia offer full autonomy to nurse practitioners so your blanket statement is an affront to nurse practitioners, shows your lack of knowledge, and unfortunately shows how nurses do not understand the role of the nurse practitioner. Are there poor performing nurse practitioners? Sure...but what about "bad doctors".

  • May 16

    Congratulations. As you have most likely read, Leik and Hollier have great reviews as does Barkley. Good luck! The key is not to memorize the questions, but understand the physiology in order to find the correct answer. Utilize all you have learned during your rotations as well!

  • May 15

    Tomayto/tomahto. While B-U-N is the correct form, I have heard "bun" frequently...even from practitioners! It may be more of a locality word as can be angina!


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